Video Games by Lana Del Rey Lyrics Meaning – The Melancholic Anthem of Romantic Devotion and Escape


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Lana Del Ray's Video Games at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

Swinging in the backyard

Pull up in your fast car

Whistling my name

Open up a beer

And you say, Get over here

And play a video game

I’m in his favourite sun dress

Watching me get undressed

Take that body downtown

I say you the bestest

Lean in for a big kiss

Put his favourite perfume on

Go play a video game

It’s you, it’s you, it’s all for you

Everything I do

I tell you all the time

Heaven is a place on earth with you

Tell me all the things you want to do

I heard that you like the bad girls

Honey, is that true?

It’s better than I ever even knew

They say that the world was built for two

Only worth living if somebody is loving you

Baby, now you do

Singing in the old bars

Swinging with the old stars

Living for the fame

Kissing in the blue dark

Playing pool and wild darts

Video games

He holds me in his big arms

Drunk and I am seeing stars

This is all I think of

Watching all our friends fall

In and out of Old Paul’s

This is my idea of fun

Playing video games

It’s you, it’s you, it’s all for you

Everything I do

I tell you all the time

Heaven is a place on earth with you

Tell me all the things you want to do

I heard that you like the bad girls

Honey, is that true?

It’s better than I ever even knew

They say that the world was built for two

Only worth living if somebody is loving you

Baby, now you do

Now you do, now you do, now you do

Now you do, now you do, now you do

It’s you, it’s you, it’s all for you

Everything I do

I tell you all the time

Heaven is a place on earth with you

Tell me all the things you want to do

I heard that you like the bad girls

Honey, is that true?

It’s better than I ever even knew

They say that the world was built for two

Only worth living if somebody is loving you

Baby, now you do

Now you do, now you do, now you do

Now you do

Now you do, now you do, now you do

Full Lyrics

Lana Del Rey’s ‘Video Games’ is more than a sultry ballad of love and desire; it is a voyeuristic indulgence into the raw fragility of romantic obsession. Punctuated by a haunting melody that seduces as much as it laments, the song carries listeners through a landscape of passion where reality is filtered through rose-tinted lenses.

As we delve into the poignant lyrics and their nuanced references, we uncover layered depths within Del Rey’s narrative. The song spins a tale of escapism, idealized love, and the bittersweetness of longing—an emblematic soundtrack for those who find sanctuary in the object of their affection.

The Heart’s Lullaby: Lana Del Rey’s Craft of Romantic Nostalgia

At first listen, ‘Video Games’ fuels the fantasy of the American Dream—a dream tinted with the nostalgia of Hollywood’s golden age, young love, and the freedom of innocence. Del Rey’s voice, smooth and melancholic, wraps itself around imagery of ‘swinging in the backyard’ and ‘living for the fame,’ plucking at the heartstrings of yearning and a return to simpler times.

However, the constructed reality within the song reflects a poignant journey back to moments infused with genuine emotions and the intensity of experience, before adulthood’s complexities tainted idealism. Through ‘Video Games,’ listeners find themselves vicariously living a timeless summer afternoon, forever on the precipice of dusk but never succumbing to the night.

Diving into the Subtext: The Song’s Hidden Narrative

Beyond the overt overtones of romance and play, ‘Video Games’ holds a subtle undercurrent of power dynamics and gender roles. The passive imagery of the female narrator (‘I’m in his favorite sun dress,’ ‘Watching me get undressed’) contrasts starkly with the active force of her lover pulling ‘up in your fast car,’ offering an invitation. This dichotomy speaks to the silent surrender of identity often experienced within consuming relationships, where individuality becomes secondary to the will of the other.

Del Rey crafts a portrait of a woman defined by her relationship, suggesting an unsettling comfort in being an object of affection. The repeated chant, ‘It’s you, it’s you, it’s all for you,’ echoes the relinquishment of self in the pursuit of an other’s happiness— a poignant reminder of the often-unspoken sacrifices made in the name of love.

Melody of Myth: Dissecting the Cultural References

Incorporating a literary and cultural mythos, Del Rey invokes the image of ‘Heaven is a place on earth with you,’ a line that alludes not only to a love that feels divine but also ties back to the pop culture lexicon of past eras. These echoes act as invitations, beckoning to transcend the mundane, to embrace a love that rivals the heavens—a daring proposition, yet one that resonates with the universal quest for an extraordinary love.

The song’s cultural layering extends to its reference to ‘bad girls,’ a nod to the nostalgic archetype of the femme fatale. This character, both adored and feared, encapsulates the complex affair with freedom and rebellion that has perennially enchanted society—a fleeting glimpse into the allure of danger mingled with desire.

A Phrase That Echoes: Unpacking the Song’s Memorable Lines

‘The world was built for two,’ Del Rey asserts, searing the idea into the consciousness of listeners. It is a line that captures the essence of romantic idealism—the concept that life attains its fullest potential only when shared with a kindred spirit. It strikes a chord in the longing for profound connection, validating the notion that love can be grand enough to justify existence.

Similar weight is carried by the affirmation ‘Only worth living if somebody is loving you,’ a statement laden with the poignant reality of human vulnerability and dependence. The simplicity of these words, starkly contrasted with the complexity of the human condition, imbues the song with a depth that only grows more profound with reflection.

The Echoes of Lust and Lullabies: Reflecting on Lana’s Lyrical Landscape

‘Video Games’ traverses the existential landscape from blissful escapism to a raw recognition of dependency. While listeners may initially fall for the intoxicating lull of love’s lullabies, deeper exploration reveals an unflinching portrayal of lust, adoration, and the occasional melancholy that accompanies giving oneself over to another.

The song closes on a cycle of affirmation ‘Now you do,’ the final seal of romantic consecration. Lana Del Rey’s mastery lies in crafting a musical experience that feels intimately personal while universal—evoking the timeless and the ephemeral, and urging us to ponder the costs and the ecstasy of surrendering to love’s video game.

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