B.E.D. – Uncovering The Layers of Desire and Reality in R&B


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Jacquees's B.E.D. at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Rhythm of Recklessness: Dancing on the Fine Line of Love and Lust
  5. The Lure of the Limelight: Success and Its Seductive Side Effects
  6. A Symphony of Self-Confidence: The Power of Swagger in ‘B.E.D.’
  7. Beneath the Sheets: The Unspoken Vulnerability in Jacquees’s Bold Declaration
  8. Echoes of Michael Jackson and Moonwalks into the Night: The Legacy of Influence

Lyrics

I know you wanna love
But I just wanna fuck
And girl you know the deal
I gotta keep it real
I know you wanna see
I know you wanna be
In my B-E-D, grinding slowly
I know you wanna love
But I just wanna fuck
And girl you know the deal
I gotta keep it real
I know you wanna see
I know you wanna be
In my B-E-D, grinding slowly

Ay, what it is what you wanna know?
I done ripped about a hundred shows
You’ll be coming back to me
Ay, you’ll be coming back to me
Always worried ’bout them other hoes
And you’ll be on me when the money flows
And they be looking out for Quees
And they be looking out for Quees
Bitch bad, no Kanye
When we do it, do it our way
2015 Wanya
I don’t give no damn ’bout what ya mom say
Rollie wrist, I’m the shit
Twenty one with no kids
‘Bout to rain on a bitch (what)
I’ma rain on a bitch

I know you wanna love
But I just wanna fuck
And girl you know the deal
I gotta keep it real
I know you wanna see
I know you wanna be
In my B-E-D, grinding slowly
I know you wanna love
But I just wanna fuck
And girl you know the deal
I gotta keep it real
I know you wanna see
I know you wanna be
In my B-E-D, grinding slowly

Baby girl, she the action
Don’t know why you actin
She on ready-set-go, she will never let go
Need it all, fuck a fraction
Know she think I’m Michael Jackson
Billie Jean, moon walk
I need the front and the back end
She in love with the fashion
But she in love with the flashin’
Bitch, this ain’t ya money
Bitch, I spend it on you ’cause you know I have it
With my woes in the six
Ex hoes, yeah, they sick
I’ma rain on a bitch
Let me rain on a bitch

I know you wanna love
But I just wanna fuck
And girl you know the deal
I gotta keep it real
I know you wanna see
I know you wanna be
In my B-E-D, grinding slowly
I know you wanna love
But I just wanna fuck
And girl you know the deal
I gotta keep it real
I know you wanna see
I know you wanna be
In my B-E-D, grinding slowly

Rollie wrist, I’m the shit
Twenty one with no kids
I’ma rain on a bitch
‘Bout to rain on a bitch
Rollie wrist, I’m the shit
Twenty one with no kids
I’ma rain on a bitch
‘Bout to rain on a bitch
Rollie wrist, I’m the shit
Twenty one with no kids
I’ma rain on a bitch
‘Bout to rain on a bitch
Rollie wrist, I’m the shit
Twenty one with no kids
I’ma rain on a bitch
‘Bout to rain on a bitch

Full Lyrics

Amidst the sensual beats and the smooth rhythm of modern R&B, Jacquees’s track ‘B.E.D.’ emerges as an anthem of raw desire, draped in the unapologetic honesty of youth. As we peel back the layers of this seemingly straightforward ode to physical pleasure, we uncover a deeper narrative that speaks to the complexities of love, lust, and the search for authenticity in an age of performance.

At a glance, ‘B.E.D.’ may simply play like the soundtrack for late-night rendezvous and unbridled emotion. However, a closer listen reveals an intricate dance between explicit intentions and subtle societal critiques. Let’s dive into the world Jacquees creates with his bold lyrics and explore the song’s potentially hidden meanings, memorable lines, and its place in the cultural landscape.

The Rhythm of Recklessness: Dancing on the Fine Line of Love and Lust

The central theme of ‘B.E.D.’ is rooted in the universal tension between the need for emotional connection and the pursuit of physical satisfaction. Jacquees doesn’t shy away from declaring his desires, establishing a forthright narrative where love is not on the agenda—at least not in the traditional sense. His willingness to ‘keep it real’ might be received as a breath of fresh air or a brash declaration, depending on who’s listening.

Yet, beneath the blatant honesty lies an undercurrent of introspection. The repetition of ‘I just wanna fuck’ is not a mere boast but a candid admission that transcends the typical bravado of R&B lyrics. It probes the listener to question the validity of romantic expectations in a world where instant gratification often takes precedence.

The Lure of the Limelight: Success and Its Seductive Side Effects

Jacquees references his ascent to stardom with lines like ‘I done ripped about a hundred shows’ and flaunts the attention it attracts (‘they be looking out for Quees’). The wealth and status symbols—the Rolexes and the lack of familial ties—serve not just as bragging rights but as markers of a successful single man in the height of his career.

These symbols also act as bait, drawing in both affection and opportunism. The song captures the duality faced by artists in the public eye: the genuine connections that fame jeopardizes and the superficiality it breeds. In navigating these waters, Jacquees presents an image of a man both relishing in and wary of the privileges his success affords him.

A Symphony of Self-Confidence: The Power of Swagger in ‘B.E.D.’

Swagger permeates ‘B.E.D.’, with confidence exuding from every verse. ‘Rollie wrist, I’m the shit,’ Jacquees asserts, brandishing his accomplishments like a medallion of self-assurance. This is more than ego; it’s a self-assuredness that resonates with listeners, inspiring a sense of fearlessness in the pursuit of what one wants.

This bravado is a staple in R&B and hip-hop, a genre that often equates success with self-worth. It’s a reminder that in a world filled with doubt and restraint, embracing one’s achievements and standing tall in your individuality can be an act of rebellion.

Beneath the Sheets: The Unspoken Vulnerability in Jacquees’s Bold Declaration

While ‘B.E.D.’ seems dominated by overt bravado and carnal confessions, a hint of vulnerability slips through the cracks. Statements like ‘You’ll be coming back to me’ and the insistence on the physical ‘grinding slowly’ imply an undercurrent of yearning for more than just physical closeness. There’s a hidden plea for permanence in the temporary, a dance between the heart and the body that many can relate to.

The song wades through the common human fear of being left out in the cold, forgotten amid the ‘other hoes.’ Yet, it packages these fears in a machismo that both masks and reveals an intrinsic desire for connection that transcends mere physicality.

Echoes of Michael Jackson and Moonwalks into the Night: The Legacy of Influence

References to icons like Michael Jackson’s ‘Billie Jean’ tacitly acknowledge the roots from which modern R&B has grown. By invoking the King of Pop, Jacquees links himself to a musical lineage of greats who have expertly blended showmanship with commentary on fame, love, and societal expectations.

The name-dropping is more than just homage; it’s an indication of Jacquees’s awareness of his place in the paradigm of musical evolution. By connecting his story to those who moonwalked before him, ‘B.E.D.’ celebrates the genre’s past while unflinchingly propelling it into a future shaped by unabashed transparency and the embrace of one’s own narrative.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *