Beautiful Boyz – A Lyrical Dive into CocoRosie’s Ode to Marginalized Beauty


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for CocoRosie's Beautiful Boyz at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Outlaw As Muse: A Radical Celebration
  5. Sonic Landscapes That Transcend the Normative
  6. The Hidden Meaning: Celebrating Unseen Beauty
  7. Memorable Lines Steeped in Irony
  8. A Eulogy to the Executed Romance

Lyrics

Those, those beautiful boys
Those, those beautiful boys

Cocorosie :
Born illegitimately
To a whore, most likely
He became an orphan
Oh what a lovely orphan he was
Sent to the reformatory
Ten years old, was his first glory
Got caught stealing from a nun
Now his love story had begun

Thirty years he spent wandering
A devil’s child with dove wings
He went to prison
In every country he set foot in
Oh how he loved prison
How awfully lovely was prison

Antony :
All those beautiful boys
Pimps and queens and criminal queers
All those beautiful boys
Tattoos of ships and tattoos of tears

Cocorosie :
His greatest love was executed
The pure romance was undisputed
Angelic hoodlums and holy ones
Angelic hoodlums and holy ones

Antony :
All those beautiful boys
Pimps and queens and criminal queers
All those beautiful boys
Tattoos of ships and tattoos of tears

All those beautiful boys
Pimps and queens and criminal queers
All those beautiful boys
Tattoos of ships and tattoos of tears

All those beautiful boys
Beautiful boys…
All those beautiful boys
Beautiful boys…

Those beautiful boys…

Full Lyrics

In their distinctly ethereal and unsettling ode, ‘Beautiful Boyz’, CocoRosie crafts a narrative that is as haunting as it is beautiful. This song is not merely a collection of melodies and lyrics; it is an evocative journey through the shadows and light of marginalized lives. CocoRosie’s artistic expression often defies conventional categorization, and ‘Beautiful Boyz’ is no exception.

On the surface, it speaks of love, perhaps lost, but beneath its skin is a canvas streaked with themes of identity, society’s outcasts, and the perception of beauty. The refrain, lamenting the plight of life’s undervalued souls, has become an anthem for the unorthodox bonds and the tragic tales that unfold in the most unlikely of places.

The Outlaw As Muse: A Radical Celebration

CocoRosie’s ‘Beautiful Boyz’ unfolds as a ballad to those who have been cast aside by society’s narrow view of virtue and vice. The song’s protagonist lives a life that society deems illegitimate, finding solace among kindred spirits in the peripheries. CocoRosie employs a vivid narrative to epitomize the outlaws and the misunderstood, challenging listeners to find beauty in the lives that tradition pushes to the background.

Through the tale of the orphan-turned-rebel, the song challenges the stigma attached to the pimps, queens, and ‘criminal queers’ mentioned in the chorus. By juxtaposing ‘tattoos of ships and tattoos of tears’, the lyrics paint a poignant picture of hope and heartache, charting the course for survival and solace in a world that’s quick to judge and slow to understand.

Sonic Landscapes That Transcend the Normative

CocoRosie’s musical backdrop for ‘Beautiful Boyz’ blends seamlessly with the narrative’s purity and corruption. The song’s diverse elements fuse lo-fi indie-folk with operatic interludes, creating a dreamy yet discordant atmosphere. It’s a testament to their genius that they can mesh such disparate sounds, reflecting the song’s thematic contradictions.

The haunting vocals and understated instrumentals serve to amplify the emotional impact of the lyrics. Listeners find themselves in a somber soundscape that complements the tale of freedom found behind bars and wings clipped by societal expectation. Each note, like every word, seems to float on the flux between captivity and flight.

The Hidden Meaning: Celebrating Unseen Beauty

At the heart of ‘Beautiful Boyz’ lies a poignant social commentary on the perception of beauty and grace in modern society. For CocoRosie, the ‘beautiful boys’ embody a deeper defiance against a system that represses diversity and romanticizes conformity. The mention of tattoos serves as symbolism for the indelible impressions that experiences, no matter how painful, leave upon an individual’s identity.

This song isn’t just a lament; it’s a mirror that CocoRosie holds up to society, reflecting a spectrum of life too often viewed in monochrome. The infusion of ‘angelic hoodlums’ and ‘holy ones’ blurs the dichotomy of good and evil, and suggests that there is sanctity even in the most broken of places and people.

Memorable Lines Steeped in Irony

‘He went to prison / In every country he set foot in / Oh how he loved prison / How awfully lovely was prison,’ croons CocoRosie, lacing these words with a delicious irony. These lines don’t merely tell the tale of a nomadic spirit bound by the law; they hint at the allure of constraints and the paradox of finding solace in captivity.

The stark beauty in these memorable lines lies in the complexity they hold within. The listener is led on a dance between reality and sarcasm, between the bitterness of imprisonment and the sweet liberation found in unintended sanctuaries. CocoRosie invites us to question if, for some, prison becomes a place of raw honesty, more freeing than the facades we cling to outside.

A Eulogy to the Executed Romance

‘His greatest love was executed / The pure romance was undisputed.’ These haunting lyrics serve as both eulogy and tribute to loves and lives lost in the face of societal decree. Through the motif of an executed love, an entire spectrum of emotions and experiences is represented, encompassing the trials of nonconformist passion.

In ‘Beautiful Boyz’, CocoRosie’s lyrics simultaneously mourn and celebrate those who have loved unabashedly in the face of opposition and intolerance. The song becomes a canvas upon which stories of affection, no matter how doomed or condemned, are acknowledged as pure and valorous, reminding us that sometimes the most transformative love stories are those that society is quickest to disown.

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