Black Hole – Navigating the Void of Lost Love and Emotional Healing


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for griff's Black Hole at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Universal Echo of Heartache
  5. Chasing Ghosts of the Past
  6. Unpacking the Void’s Anatomy
  7. Memorable Lines that Clutch the Soul
  8. The Hidden Meaning: Reclaiming Wholeness Amid Absence

Lyrics

Now and then
Your name comes up in conversation with my friends
I hate how much I feel it right there in my chest
I hate how much I feel it, yeah
Like, how are you?
It seems like things are going really well for you
I wish that I could say the same about me too
I wish that I could say the same

And boy, you know I’ve tried to pray, I’ve bruised my knees
I’ve tried to bring you back to me
I’ve tried my best to find some kind of peace
Don’t you see?

There’s a big black hole where my heart used to be
And I’ve tried my best to fill it up with things I don’t need
It don’t work like that, no, it’s not easy
To fill this gap that you left in me
There’s a big black hole where my heart used to be
And I wish that you would realize I’m all that you need
It don’t work like that, no, it’s not easy
To fill this gap that you left in me

Without a trace
You disappeared and took some of me with you, babe
Like the way I used to laugh until my belly ached
Well, that’s all gone away now, yeah

And boy, you know I’ve tried to pray, I’ve bruised my knees
I’ve tried to bring you back to me
I’ve tried my best to find some kind of peace
Don’t you see?

There’s a big black hole where my heart used to be
And I’ve tried my best to fill it up with things I don’t need
It don’t work like that, no, it’s not easy
To fill this gap that you left in me
There’s a big black hole where my heart used to be
And I wish that you would realize I’m all that you need
It don’t work like that, no, it’s not easy
To fill this gap that you left in me (that you left in me)

Oh, oh, oh, oh (there’s such a big black hole)
Oh, oh, oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh, oh (that you left in me)
Oh, oh, oh, oh

There’s a big black hole where my heart used to be
And I’ve tried my best to fill it up with things I don’t need
It don’t work like that, no, it’s not easy
To fill this gap that you left in me (oh, that you left in me)
There’s a big black hole where my heart used to be (oh, yeah, you left in me)
And I wish that you would realize I’m all that you need (no)
It don’t work like that, no, it’s not easy (oh no, it’s not easy)
To fill this gap that you left in me (that you left in me)

Full Lyrics

In the echoing chambers of a heart stricken by loss, Griff’s ‘Black Hole’ is a raw manifestation of the struggle to reconcile with absence. The song is a melodic catharsis that transcends personal pain into a collective experience of heartache and the pursuit of self-restoration.

The lyrics of ‘Black Hole’ serve as an intimate blueprint of the emotional landscape one must navigate post-breakup. Griff not only illustrates the all-consuming nature of a metaphorical black hole left by a lost love but also illuminates the futility of attempting to fill that void with superficial remedies.

A Universal Echo of Heartache

Griff’s voice, a vessel of visceral emotion, carries the universal tale of heartbreak. ‘Black Hole’ captures that moment of recognition when one’s day-to-day discourse can no longer conceal the name that weighs heavy on the heart. It crafts a narrative familiar to so many—a sudden catch in the chest upon a once-beloved name surfacing in casual conversation.

The song’s lyrical journey through these personal tremors of distress invites listeners into a shared space of vulnerability. It’s the vulnerable admission of emotive scars that connects the audience to Griff, as she strips back the layers to reveal the raw humanity beneath.

Chasing Ghosts of the Past

The act of trying to ‘pray’ someone back into existence signifies the desperation that clings to lost love. The imagery of ‘bruised knees’ represents the physical manifestations of such emotional labor—grueling and ultimately fruitless. Griff’s impassioned pleas for return and peace hinge on the poetic, conjuring a feeling of futility in her attempts to reverse the irreversible.

As she confesses the intensity of these attempts, the song becomes a poignant testament to the lengths one will go to attempt to bridge the distance between what was and what is—a gap that, sadly, seems only to widen with time.

Unpacking the Void’s Anatomy

The recurring motif of the ‘big black hole where my heart used to be’ is not just a metaphor for absence but a profound expression of identity redefined by loss. It’s an exploration of the emptiness that takes residence in the wake of love’s departure, a hollowness that once pulsed with life and laughter.

The song is an acknowledgment that this void cannot be filled by mere distractions or material things. Griff’s repeated admission becomes a chant, a mantra of sorts that speaks to the intricate process of emotional recuperation—recognizing that some vacancies are simply irreplaceable.

Memorable Lines that Clutch the Soul

Within ‘Black Hole,’ certain lines linger with an adhesive quality that captures the essence of the theme. ‘Without a trace / You disappeared and took some of me with you, babe,’ encapsulates the involuntary surrender of self that occurs when we intertwine our lives with another.

The lingering ache of joking ‘until my belly ached’ is poignant in its simplicity; it evokes a nostalgia for a time when joy was an easy guest. These memorable lines linger on the subconscious reel, ensuring the song’s emotional resonance well beyond the last note.

The Hidden Meaning: Reclaiming Wholeness Amid Absence

Beyond the heartache and the empty efforts to fill the emotional void lies a deeper narrative within ‘Black Hole.’ The song, while steeped in the imagery of loss, also subtly stokes the embers of self-recovery and the journey back to wholeness.

Griff’s yearning for recognition from the one who left—a wish that they would see her as ‘all that you need’—is a powerful, if paradoxical, call for self-empowerment. Ultimately, ‘Black Hole’ isn’t just about the dark void left behind; it’s about finding the strength and light to seal that space with newfound self-love and understanding.

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