Church by Chase Atlantic: Diving Into the Dark Sacrament of Love and Lust


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Chase Atlantic's Church at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Desire as Worship: The Thin Line Between Sacred and Profane
  5. Exploring the Intimate Confession Booth
  6. Baptized in Sin: The Lyrics’ Twisted Sanctity
  7. The Hidden Meaning: A Paradise Lost or Gained?
  8. Quotable Catechism: Memorable Lines that Preach

Lyrics

You’re wearing nothing but my t-shirt
Call me shallow but I’m only getting deeper, yeah
Stay on the ground until your knees hurt
No more praying baby Imma be your preacher

And I’ll keep leading you on
If you keep leading me into your room
The drinks are all gone
But that’s fine baby so am I

I’m about to take you back to church
(Back to church baby)
Well tell me your confessions baby what’s the worst, yeah
(Yeah what’s the worst)
Baptise in your thighs til’ it hurts
(You know it hurts)
Cause I’m about to take you back to church
(Oh, oh yeah)

I’ll keep you up until the sunset
Speaking in tongues yeah we ain’t done yet, yeah
Don’t take my verses out of context
I know it’s weighing on your conscience

And I’ll keep leading you on
If you keep leading me into your room
The drinks are all gone
But that’s fine baby so am I

I’m about to take you back to church
(Back to church baby)
Well tell me your confessions baby what’s the worst, yeah
(Yeah what’s the worst)
Baptise in your thighs til’ it hurts
(You know it hurts)
Cause I’m about to take you back to church
(Oh, oh yeah)

And I’ll keep leading you on
(Leading you on girl)
If you keep leading me into your room
(Your room)
The drinks are all gone
(All gone now)
But that’s fine baby so am I

I’ll keep you up until the sunset
Speaking in tongues yeah we ain’t done yet
Don’t take my verses out of context
I know it’s weighing on your conscience

I’m about to take you back to church
(Back to church baby)
Well tell me your confessions baby what’s the worst, yeah
(Yeah what’s the worst)
Baptise in your thighs til’ it hurts
(You know it hurts)
Cause I’m about to take you back to church
(Oh, oh yeah)

Full Lyrics

Chase Atlantic, the Australian trio known for their sultry blend of R&B-infused rock, spins a web of dark romanticism with their song ‘Church.’ The track, dripping with religious symbolism and sultry innuendo, provides listeners with an introspective exploration of the blurred lines between sacred adoration and profane desire.

Navigating through the provocative verses and the hypnotic chorus, the depths of ‘Church’ reveal a complex narrative of temptation and surrender. This becomes an anthem for the entangled, those caught in the push-and-pull of passion and the intoxicating dance of leading and being led.

Desire as Worship: The Thin Line Between Sacred and Profane

The song’s opening lines instantly immerse the audience in a scene painted with intimacy and vulnerability. Here, the protagonist’s lover wears nothing but his t-shirt, a visual that toes the line between domestic familiarity and sensual possession. The phrase ‘Call me shallow but I’m only getting deeper’ might suggest a shallow start to the relationship, evolving into a more profound connection, or perhaps a deepening descent into a taboo.

Cloaked in the guise of a spiritual leader, the narrator self-proclaims as a preacher, implying a level of authority and guidance in this carnal communion. The act of staying ‘on the ground until your knees hurt’ could serve as both a double entendre for physical submission and a parody of worship, where religious kneeling is repurposed as a signifier of sexual dominance and control.

Exploring the Intimate Confession Booth

The confessional is a traditionally private space for unburdening oneself of sins, but Chase Atlantic flips the script. The illicit becomes the litany, and the lovers’ secrets become the verses of their volatile hymn. The lyrics ‘Tell me your confessions baby what’s the worst’ elicit a tantalizing invitation to share in the forbidden, where vulnerability weaves together with excitement.

This invitation sets the tone for a deeper understanding of intimacy that is gritty and raw. Chase Atlantic unabashedly takes the listener into the realm where confessions are whispered between sheets rather than in the hallowed halls of a church, driving the point that sometimes the emotional weight of secrets shared during intimate moments can be as severe as those spoken behind the anonymity of the confession box.

Baptized in Sin: The Lyrics’ Twisted Sanctity

Utilizing ecclesiastical language, Chase Atlantic presents a twisted form of baptism, where ‘Baptise in your thighs til’ it hurts’ metaphorically represents immersion not in holy water, but in the depths of sensual pleasure. This line is a beautiful corrosion of a sacred rite, reborn as a symbol of the intense and sometimes painful merging of two bodies in their pursuit of ecstasy.

The sensory overload implied by these words aligns with the nature of the song itself—passionate, intense, and enveloping. In this context, the act of baptism becomes both an end and a beginning, echoing the simultaneous end of resistance to temptation and the birth of a new erotic dynamic between the protagonists.

The Hidden Meaning: A Paradise Lost or Gained?

Beneath the provocative sexuality, ‘Church’ may house a more profound contemplation on the nature of modern love. The repeated assurances of leading and being led suggest an interchange between dominance and submission that extends beyond the bedroom. There’s a lingering question of control and consent; to what extent are the lovers willing participants, and what are they seeking through this connection?

Furthermore, ‘Church’ could reflect on the secularization of once-sacred ideals. As the traditional symbols of religion are repurposed to frame a romance, are we witnessing a decline of spirituality, or is it simply taking on a new form? Is the song celebrating the liberation from conventional mores, or is it hinting at a loss of direction in a world where the sacred no longer holds its ground?

Quotable Catechism: Memorable Lines that Preach

Flitting between reverence and irreverence, the songwriters have crafted lines that linger long after the music fades. ‘Speaking in tongues yeah we ain’t done yet’ is one such jewel, encapsulating the whole person—body and soul—consumed in the experience. Such potent lyrics serve as intimate hymns for the listeners, inviting them to find their own meanings within the mix of spiritual and sensual.

Even as ‘Church’ draws to its close, its quotable lines act as a form of paradoxical scripture emphasizing the intense and almost religious fervor with which we seek connection in an increasingly disenchanted world. Chase Atlantic’s narrative thus preaches a theology ofyearning, a contemporary gospel where love, or the pursuit thereof, reigns supreme.

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