goods – Unpacking the Layers of Identity and Domesticity


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for iamamiwhoami's goods at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Metronome of Monotony: Dissecting Domestic Rituals
  5. Looking Out Your Little Mind: The Illusion of Awareness
  6. Denial as a Virtue: The Unspoken Sacrifice
  7. Who Am I Beyond Your Designated Wife? The Quest for Identity
  8. Where You’re Taking Me: The Uncharted Voyage of Self-Exploration

Lyrics

You make a neat and tidy house, a good worker does
A pinion of labors men as capable as trust

From a lower point of view, comes the underlying truth
Keeping yourself unaware, confident we know you care
Looking out your little mind, recognizing time has passed
Ready for some further use, denial is a virtue

I make a good and steady friend there, a companion through life
But who am I, when all I am is your designated wife?

From a lower point of view, comes the underlying truth
Keeping yourself unaware, confident we know you care
Looking out your little mind, recognizing time has passed
Ready for some further use, denial is a virtue

From a lower point of view, comes the underlying truth
Keeping yourself unaware, confident we know you care
Looking out your little mind, recognizing time has passed
Ready for some further use, denial is a virtue

Sadly, I have not defined where you’re taking me

Full Lyrics

Amidst the wave of electropop’s burgeoning crescendo, Swedish music project iamamiwhoami, lead by enigmatic songstress Jonna Lee, has carved out a significant niche. Known for their cryptic narratives and visually stunning music videos, the project’s song ‘goods’ beckons listeners into a labyrinth of introspection and social critique. As we peel back the layers of this mesmerizing track, we’re invited to explore themes of identity, domestic roles, and the quiet struggle between self-realization and societal expectation.

The song ‘goods’ is not just a sonic journey but a psychological one. With its haunting melodies and poignant lyrics, listeners are forced to confront the manufactured reality of domestic bliss and the internal monologues of those entrenched in these facades. Each verse carries with it the weight of traditional norms and the implicit challenge to these long-standing beliefs. The song becomes an echo chamber of the unspoken, resonating with the unsettled truths that lie beneath the veneer of a well-tended life.

The Metronome of Monotony: Dissecting Domestic Rituals

The opening lines render a stark image: a neat and tidy house, a symbol of order and domestic achievement. Yet, this pristine arrangement is also a cage of routine, where the protagonist, presumably a woman, becomes a cog in the machinery of ‘labors men.’ Here, ‘goods’ delves into the domestic sphere, questioning the worth and identity that come from fulfilling these traditional roles. The song poignantly interrogates the value society places on domestic perfection, often at the expense of individual growth.

Moreover, the term ‘good worker’ transcends domestic boundaries, spilling into the realms of professionalism and personal life. iamamiwhoami holds a mirror to a system that rewards compliance and proficiency over self-exploration and authenticity. In the steady beat of this tune, the listener finds the rhythm of countless days spent in auto-pilot, dutifully performing tasks that offer little in the way of self-fulfillment.

Looking Out Your Little Mind: The Illusion of Awareness

The line ‘Keeping yourself unaware, confident we know you care’ speaks volumes about the internal conflict experienced by individuals who play the part expected of them, while a deeper understanding of themselves remains just out of reach. iamamiwhoami suggests that this willful ignorance is a coping mechanism, a virtuous denial that keeps the machinery of everyday life running smoothly.

This intriguing lyric plays into the duality of perception versus reality. The ‘little mind’ denotes a constrained viewpoint, the narrow scope through which one’s life is measured by the ticking of a clock and the turning of calendar pages. ‘Recognizing time has passed’ is a moment of lucidity, a brief and unsettling acknowledgment that life is slipping by, potentially unlived in its truest sense.

Denial as a Virtue: The Unspoken Sacrifice

Repeated like a mantra, ‘denial is a virtue’ becomes the chilling backbone of ‘goods.’ It exposes the heart-rending truth that many people embrace a life that doesn’t resonate with their inner self out of a sense of duty or fear of disruption. The song extends this principle to critique society’s broader tendency to uphold denial – of true feelings, desires, and even rights – as a moral high ground.

In this refrain, the listener is invited to consider the cost of upholding appearances and the silent battles fought behind closed doors. Denial sustains the illusion of harmony, but iamamiwhoami prods at the question of whether this charade leads to anything other than a diminishing of the self.

Who Am I Beyond Your Designated Wife? The Quest for Identity

Perhaps the most jarring line arrives with the simplicity of a question: ‘But who am I, when all I am is your designated wife?’ This is the voice of a person questioning their existence purely as an accessory to someone else’s life. ‘goods’ stands out as an anthem for the unrecognized and unfulfilled potential of individuals encased within the roles they play.

The question posed by the narrator transcends the experience of marital confinement. It reflects a broader societal anxiety that affects anyone who has felt their personal identity consumed by the roles ascribed to them. Through ‘goods,’ iamamiwhoami taps into a collective yearning for authenticity and purpose beyond societal labels.

Where You’re Taking Me: The Uncharted Voyage of Self-Exploration

In its concluding ambiguity, ‘Sadly, I have not defined where you’re taking me,’ ‘goods’ leaves us with a sense of unresolved journeying. It’s a poignant endnote for a song rich in internal dialogue and societal critique, pointing towards a future where the quest for self-definition is ongoing and the destination remains unknown.

This closing lyric amplifies the song’s intent to prompt self-inquiry. The true voyage, iamamiwhoami suggests, isn’t just about breaking free of societal chains, but also embarking on a deeply personal exploration to discover who we can be when released from the expectations of others.

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