Guys Like You Make Us Look Bad – Dissecting the Cry for Redemption


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Blessthefall's Guys Like You Make Us Look Bad at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. An Unsettling Narrative Cloaked in Screamo
  5. A Shoulder in the Dark: Symbol of Support in the Abyss
  6. The Chorus of Redemption: A Plea to a Higher Power
  7. Unpacking the Weight of ‘What Have They Done? What Have I Not?’
  8. The Lasting Resonance of Agonizing Melody

Lyrics

(You scream don’t look, you scream don’t touch)
(What have they done? What have I not?)
It’s every time I think about your voice I
(Start to tremble, and my throat’s aching)
And anytime you need a shoulder (I’m right there)
You’ve just gotta find a way (a way)

There she sits alone and tries to adjust
She cries, “Please let me go I won’t tell anyone”
You scream, “Don’t look,” oh please God don’t (touch)

(You scream don’t look, you scream don’t touch)
(What have they done? What have I not?)
It’s every time I think about your voice I
(Start to tremble, and my throat’s aching)
And anytime you need a shoulder (I’m right there)
You’ve just gotta find a way

(Oh God please help us) get her out of this
(Oh God please help us) get her out of this
(Oh God)
(Oh God)
(Oh God)

Full Lyrics

Hailing from the fervent screamo and post-hardcore scenes of the mid-2000s, Blessthefall crafted anthems that encapsulated the raw, uncut emotions of youth. Among their impassioned discography stands ‘Guys Like You Make Us Look Bad,’ a track that is as controversial as it is cathartic, a guttural cry against abuse wrapped in the aggressive fervor typical of the genre.

Peeling back the layers of this lyrically potent track reveals not just a story of individual suffering, but a commentary on the wider impact that personal betrayals and transgressions can have on societal perceptions and the collective conscience. It’s a complex navigation of pain, guilt, and the search for salvation, festooned with the unmistakable growls and riffs of a musical era defined by its intensity.

An Unsettling Narrative Cloaked in Screamo

The track starts with a sensory assault that mimics the inner turmoil of the narrative’s main subject. By using descriptive visceral cues like ‘you scream don’t look, you scream don’t touch,’ Blessthefall doesn’t merely describe a scene; they place their audience directly inside a harrowing experience.

It could be interpreted as a depiction of a woman’s harrowing experience with abuse. The line ‘She cries, ‘Please let me go I won’t tell anyone” serves as the chilling centerpiece, surrounded by pleas for help and escape, further amplified by the intense musicality of the genre.

A Shoulder in the Dark: Symbol of Support in the Abyss

Amid the chaotic, desperate tones, there’s a recurring offer of solace: ‘And anytime you need a shoulder (I’m right there).’ It’s a promise of support, a glimmer of hope that resonates with listeners who have felt helpless in the face of someone else’s pain.

The notion of ‘finding a way’ repeats as a mantra throughout the track, suggesting that overcoming trauma isn’t a solitary journey but one where the inflicted and the supporter navigate the healing path together.

The Chorus of Redemption: A Plea to a Higher Power

In a turn towards the spiritual, the repeated exclamations of ‘Oh God please help us,’ convey a desperate plea for divine intervention. It’s a common narrative device that highlights the severity of a situation when humans alone seem powerless to rectify it.

While the call for help is clear, there’s an undercurrent of confusion and frustration that taints the prayer with a rawness that’s palpable, tapping into the anger and hopelessness that often accompany the aftermath of trauma.

Unpacking the Weight of ‘What Have They Done? What Have I Not?’

Arguably one of the most compelling and self-reflective lines in the song, it serves as an internal and external confrontation of roles in the abuse cycle. ‘What have they done?’ acknowledges the wrongdoing of the abuser, while ‘What have I not?’ hints at a bystander’s guilt for inaction or inability to prevent the harm.

This duality captures the essence of the song — it’s not only an accusation but a shared burden, a recognition of collective failure to protect the vulnerable.

The Lasting Resonance of Agonizing Melody

While the raw subject matter is the sharp edge of the song, it’s the synergy between the aggressive instrumentals and the tortured vocals that etch the tune into the collective consciousness of the scene. The song becomes memorable not just for its lyrics, but for the emotional heft that Blessthefall brings to every line.

Years later, ‘Guys Like You Make Us Look Bad’ remains a striking example of the genre’s ability to tackle deep, troubling subjects, offering an outlet for both the rage and catharsis that accompany such dark themes.

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