In the Morning of the Magicians – Unraveling the Philosophical Tapestry


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for The Flaming Lips's In the Morning of the Magicians at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Love vs. Hate – A Cosmic Riddle Wrapped in a Melody
  5. Surrendering to the Dawn: The Inevitability of the Universe’s Will
  6. The Persistent Echo: ‘How Can It Matter?’
  7. The Elegy Of Errors: Embracing the Fallible Human Condition
  8. Memorable Lines that Magically Mesmerize

Lyrics

In the morning I’d awake
And I couldn’t remember
What is love and what is hate
The calculations error
Oh-oh-oh-what is love and what is hate
And why does it matter
Is to love just a waste?
How can it matter?

As the dawn began to break
I had to surrender
The universe will have it’s way
Too powerful to master
Oh-oh-oh-what is love and what is hate
And why does it matter
Is to love just a waste?
How can it matter?

Full Lyrics

The Flaming Lips have long enchanted listeners with their psychedelic pontifications on life, love, and the universe. ‘In the Morning of the Magicians’ is no different; it’s a track that wraps its enigmatic arms around you, whispering the existential musings of a band perennially in awe of the cosmos.

This piece from their 2002 album ‘Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots’ stands as a testament to the band’s mastery in synthesizing soundscapes that provoke deep contemplation. But what lies at the heart of this musical sorcery? Let’s cast our minds into the mystical morning that The Flaming Lips envision and decipher the codes embedded within their lyrical spell.

Love vs. Hate – A Cosmic Riddle Wrapped in a Melody

The dichotomy of ‘love and hate’ is a reoccurring theme that ebbs and flows throughout the song, challenging listeners to consider these primal emotions not as definitively separate entities, but as part of a larger, interconnected enigma. Love and hate are dissected, questioned, and thrown into the vastness of the universe for us to reevaluate.

The repeated inquiry, ‘What is love and what is hate? And why does it matter?’ serves as a chorus not only for the song but for our own internal dialogue as we grapple with their significance. The Flaming Lips don’t merely ask the questions but invite us to ponder the very nature of these emotions.

Surrendering to the Dawn: The Inevitability of the Universe’s Will

As the title suggests, the morning brings a form of enlightenment, a surrender to forces greater than oneself. The Lips speak of the universe having ‘its way,’ a humbling reminder that, despite our human efforts to control and understand everything, we are at the mercy of the cosmos and its mysterious ways.

This sense of resignation to a ‘too powerful to master’ universe gives the song a spiritual texture, highlighting the magic in the mundane, the divine dance of the day-to-day that is often overlooked in our quest for dominance and understanding.

The Persistent Echo: ‘How Can It Matter?’

This haunting question, ‘How can it matter?’, reverberates through the song, delivering a poignant reflection on the grand scale of existence versus the individual’s journey. It’s a lyrical confrontation with nihilism, a philosophical probe into whether any of our emotions or struggles hold weight in the grander scheme.

In juxtaposition with the song’s melodic lifts, this inquiry challenges the listener to wrestle with the notion that perhaps love, hate, and all of life’s passions are ephemeral against the backdrop of a vast, indifferent universe.

The Elegy Of Errors: Embracing the Fallible Human Condition

The Flaming Lips articulate a relatable, human mistake – the ‘calculations error’ – an admittance of the fallibility that permeates our understanding of the world. It’s a lyric that draws us into the morning light, fresh from the fog of sleep, only to confront our own imperfect nature.

This line, ‘I couldn’t remember / What is love and what is hate,’ underscores the fragility of our grasp on what we think we know about the deepest emotions. In our search for meaning, The Lips suggest, we often forget when faced with the sheer complexity of life.

Memorable Lines that Magically Mesmerize

Certain sentences within ‘In the Morning of the Magicians’ linger long after the song fades. Lines like ‘Is to love just a waste?’ encapsulate the confounding beauty of The Flaming Lips’ songwriting – at once deeply melancholic and stunningly profound.

If anything, the song asserts that depth is found not in the answers we seek, but in the courage to voice the questions themselves. Each line resonates, an incantation for the soulful searchers willing to wander through their own magical morning musings.

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