Kingston by Faye Webster Lyrics Meaning – Unraveling the Intimacy of Yearning


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Faye Webster's Kingston at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

The day that I met you, I started dreaming
Now I write ’em down if I remember in the morning time
I don’t know that much about Kingston
But I like the sound it makes when it starts pouring rain
I think that tonight I’ll leave my light on
‘Cause I get lonely when it’s out and I miss you right about now

Baby, tell me where you wanna go
Baby, tell me what you wanna know
Give you everything I have and more

He said, “baby,” that’s what he called me, “I love you”
Every single word you say makes me feel some type of way
It’s the thought of you that slightly scares me
But it takes my breath away, forget what I was gonna say
The day that I met you, I started dreaming
Now I write ’em down if I remember in the morning time

Baby, tell me where you want to go
Baby, tell me what you wanna know
Give you everything I have and more

Baby, tell me where you wanna go
Baby, tell me what you wanna know
Give you everything I have and more

Baby, tell me where you wanna go
Baby, tell me what you wanna know
Give you everything I have and more

Full Lyrics

Faye Webster’s ‘Kingston’ emerges as a poignant meditation on longing, love, and the ephemeral shadows of memory. Through her tender acoustic fabric, Webster weaves a narrative that is at once deeply personal and universally resonant. It’s a haunt of the heart, a ballad that captures the solitary moments wherein the mind wades through past encounters and the soft echoes of words once spoken.

The lyrics serve as intimate glimpses into the singer’s psyche, teetering between the realms of daydream and reality, Kingston stands as a metaphor – a place, possibly never visited, but felt through the pitter-patter of rain and the chambers of her own musings. As we explore the layers beneath its soothing melody and Webster’s delicate vocal delivery, ‘Kingston’ reveals depths far beyond its surface simplicity.

The Anatomy of a Dreamer’s Heart

In ‘Kingston,’ Webster encapsulates the essence of a dreamer’s spirit – one that is kept alive through the ritualistic recording of dreams upon waking. The diligent notation of these visions suggests a desire to hold onto the ephemeral, a fear of letting go of the fragments of joy that visit in the night. This diary of dreams forms a bridge between her nocturnal fantasies and the stark light of day – a personal anthology of longing for the listener to wander through.

The persistent dream motif also signifies a space where the boundaries of her affection and reality blur – dreams become a sanctum for her emotions, a refuge from the physical absence of the beloved. It is through the act of dreaming that her connection transcends the physical world, hinting at a love that is not contingent on proximity.

Rainfall in Kingston: Echoes of Emotion

Webster’s lyrics do not depict Kingston as a mere geographical locale, but rather as a soundscape intertwined with emotional significance. The ‘sound it makes when it starts pouring rain’ serves as an auditory emblem for her yearning – a sensory trigger that floods the senses with memory and desire. The choice of rain, often a symbol of cleansing and renewal, paradoxically represents a deluge of longing in this instance.

Kingston, thus, becomes a auditory bookmark, taking the listener to a place beyond latitude and longitude, but right to the heart of where reminiscence and sensorial experiences meet. It is this invocation of place through sound that grants ‘Kingston’ a universal touchstone for anyone who’s found comfort in the familiar sounds of a place associated with someone they miss.

The Fear and Thrill of Vulnerability

The contradictory nature of love’s impact is a recurring theme within the lyrics. Webster recounts, ‘It’s the thought of you that slightly scares me / But it takes my breath away,’ revealing a struggle between the fear of being so emotionally exposed and the exuberance of such raw connection. Her admission is one of honesty, laying bare the internal tug-of-war between wanting to fall completely and protecting oneself from potential heartbreak.

It’s the bravery in these confessions that endears Webster to her audience. The dexterity with which she conveys the inherent risks of love and the contradictory emotions it elicits, makes ‘Kingston’ a timeless piece that not only dissects vulnerability but also celebrates it as a poignant player in the human experience of love.

A Chorus of Devotion: The Power of Promise in ‘Kingston’

Webster’s chorus is a resonant promise—a pledge of complete surrender to the object of her affections. ‘Give you everything I have and more,’ she offers, an echo of fidelity and devotion that transcends physical distance and the confines of the song itself. This lyrical offering is a blanket of commitment that covers the emotional spectrum of the piece, offering warmth even amidst the pangs of absence.

By repeating the chorus throughout the song, Webster illustrates the cyclical nature of her sentiments, engraining the promise deep within the listener’s conscience. Each reiteration is a reinforcement of her words, a mantra signifying the permanence of her feelings in the ever-changing landscape of relationships.

Unlocking ‘Kingston’s’ Silent Whispers: The Hidden Meaning

Beyond its lush, overt tapestry of love and dreams, ‘Kingston’ harbors a quieter revelation that radiates in its undercurrents. The consistent return to the theme of light, as Webster contemplates whether to flick the switch off or not, serves as a metaphor for her internal debate on whether to cloister her feelings or let them illuminate her existence.

To leave the light on is to acknowledge the presence of loneliness and the shadow of her absent lover. Thus, ‘Kingston’ isn’t merely a love song, it’s a luminescent confession of dependence and independence, a balancing act that plays out in the heart’s recesses where the echoes of romance and self-reliance converse in whispers too soft for daylight’s clarity.

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