La valse des monstres – Unraveling the Waltz of Emotional Fortitude


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Yann Tiersen's La valse des monstres at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Dance with Domesticity: Peeling Back the Layers of ‘Le Vent Du Nord’
  5. Beneath the Surface: The Hidden Meaning in Tiersen’s Melodic Metaphors
  6. ‘Ah! Hurry Home’ – A Piercing Call to the Senses
  7. The Euphony of Excuse: ‘Sorry, Sorry, Sorry my wife’
  8. To Drink or Not to Drink: Navigating Tradition and Temptation

Lyrics

Le Vent Du Nord

Dans Les Airs

La Piastre Des Etats

When we speak of marriage, yes that funny

Yes that funny hobby, I wouldn’t say

For if my tender maid would go, I would suffer martyrdom

One day I ask my wife what I will do to-day

What you will do to-Day, you will get the flour out

You will fin a bag at the nearer neighbour lady

I wasn’t already arrived, my wife came and fetch me

My wife came and fetch me with and blow whit a screener

Ah! hurry hurry home, you shall find what to do

Sorry, sorry, sorry my wife, sorry sorry for this time

Sorry sorry for this time, il was my friend dear-Pierre

Who got me to the cabaret, I who didn’t wanted to drink

Ah! it’s to drink, to drink to drink, ah! it’s to drink that we need

Ah! it’s to drink that we need, always the old use

Ah! if somebody could pay the drink, my cold would disappear

Full Lyrics

Deep within the folds of Yann Tiersen’s poignant and stirring composition ‘La valse des monstres,’ lies a fable of human emotion, whispered through the delicate dance of notes rather than words. The instrumental piece, devoid of lyrics, becomes a vessel for Tiersen’s evocative storytelling, compelling the audience to lend their own experiences to the music and draw personal meaning from the haunting melodies.

However, the task before us is an exploration of meaning within the seemingly simple yet profound lyrical accompaniment of ‘Le Vent Du Nord,’ a song that lives within the same album and breathes a similar air of whimsical melancholy, as experienced through a different sensory medium. In this linguistic lattice, Tiersen engineers a rustic tapestry of marital strife and folkloric charm that enhances our understanding of the entire album.

A Dance with Domesticity: Peeling Back the Layers of ‘Le Vent Du Nord’

The song ‘Le Vent Du Nord,’ which translates to ‘The North Wind,’ presents itself as a playful elegy to marital life—one filled with trials, tribulations, and the occasional trappings of the tavern. Through its jovial rhythm, the song captures a narrative often lost in the simplicity of its melody. The lyrics reflect the constant negotiation and navigation that characterizes a marriage, poignant in both its humor and its honesty.

As Tiersen takes us through this conversation between husband and wife, his music acts as a disarming backdrop to the universal push and pull of relationships. The wind, perhaps a metaphor for the inevitable forces that sweep through and shape our lives, also hints at the ebb and flow of connection and miscommunication.

Beneath the Surface: The Hidden Meaning in Tiersen’s Melodic Metaphors

While the literal interpretation of the lyrics can evoke a rustic scene from a bygone era, the subtext of ‘Le Vent Du Nord’ is as timeless as the act of storytelling itself. The inebriated pleadings of the husband to the wife, an excuse cloaked in camaraderie, stretch beyond the specifics of the tale to touch on the broader theme of human fallibility and forgiveness.

Extracting the essence of ‘La valse des monstres’ from its lyrical relative is akin to finding patterns in the chaos—a task Yann Tiersen accomplishes with a deft hand. In each note and word, Tiersen invites introspection and a search for deeper truths within the waltz of the everyday.

‘Ah! Hurry Home’ – A Piercing Call to the Senses

‘Ah! hurry hurry home, you shall find what to do,’ echoes as more than a demand; it resonates as a wakeup call. Tiersen’s choice of repetition and rhythm here emphasizes the inevitability of domestic duties, a beat to which we all must someday dance. The partner’s plea becomes symbolic of life’s ceaseless demands, and the music invites listeners to waltz alongside.

These words transcend their immediate context to chime in with the album’s broader themes of internal conflict and reconciliation—themes that ‘La valse des monstres’ articulates without saying a single word.

The Euphony of Excuse: ‘Sorry, Sorry, Sorry my wife’

The penitent refrain ‘Sorry, sorry, sorry my wife,’ sung with a mix of contrition and half-heartedness, is more than a mere apology. It’s an admission of weakness delivered in a cadence that belies its sincerity. Tiersen expertly navigates these waters of regret, injecting humor and melancholy in equal measure, a testament to the complex dimensions of human relationships.

This memorable line is the kind that sticks with you, bouncing in your head long after the last note fades. It captures, in a nutshell, the universality of seeking forgiveness, of trying to mend bridges even when they’re singed by the very breath of our flaws.

To Drink or Not to Drink: Navigating Tradition and Temptation

The resolute declaration ‘Ah! it’s to drink, to drink to drink, ah! it’s to drink that we need,’ serves as both a justification and a revelation of character. Here Tiersen encapsulates an all-too-human desire for escape, for leaning on age-old customs—like the ‘old use’ of drinking away one’s troubles—to heal the ailment of the cold or, one might speculate, the coldness of life’s hardships.

This repetition and emphasis on tradition offer an insight into the coping mechanisms we adopt and the rituals we hold dear. With the same stroke, Tiersen tips a hat to the whims of fate and choice, extending an invitation to find comfort in the waltz of time-honored habits, while casting a sly, knowing glance at their possible futility.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like...