Long Season – Delving into the Dreamlike Landscape of a Nostalgic Odyssey


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Fishmans's Long Season at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Fluid Ode to Tokyo Twilight – Parsing the Setting
  5. The Echoes of Melancholic Nostalgia in a Hummed Tune
  6. Unraveling the Dream within a Dream – The Song’s Concealed Core
  7. The Synergy of Words and Music in Crafting Atmosphere
  8. The Enduring Image – ‘The Thing that Falls from the Back Mirror’

Lyrics

夕暮れ時を二人で走ってゆく
Yuuguredoki wo futari de hashitteyuku
Running in the evening twilight just two of us

風を呼んで 君を呼んで
Kaze wo yonde, kimi wo yonde
Calling the wind, calling you

東京の街のスミからスミまで
Tokyo no machi no sumi kara sumi made
From Tokyo city corner to corner

僕ら半分 夢の中
Bokura hanbun yume no naka
We are half in a dream.

くちずさむ歌はなんだ?
Kuchizusamu uta wa nanda?
What is the song are you humming?

思い出すことはなんだ?
Omoidasu koto wa nanda?
What things can you remember?

バックミラーから落っこちて行くのは
Bakkumiraa kara okkotite yuku no wa
The thing that falls from back mirror

うれしいような さみしいような
Ureshiiyouna samishiiyouna
It seems happy, maybe lonely

風邪薬でやられちまったみたいな
Kazegusuri de yararetimatta mitaina
Like affected by a cold medicine

そんな そんな 気分で
Sonna sonna kibun de
In such a mood

走ってる 走ってる 走ってる 走ってる
Hashitteru hashitteru hashitteru hashitteru
I’m running. Running. Running. Running.

くちずさむ歌はなんだ?
Kuchizusamu uta wa nanda?
What is the song are you humming?

思い出すことはなんだ?
Omoidasu koto wa nanda?
What things can you remember?

僕ら半分 夢の中
Bokura hanbun yume no naka…
We are half in a dream.

Full Lyrics

Every so often, a song arises from the ether of music’s vast canon that encapsulates more than just a catchy hook or a hummable melody. Fishmans’ ‘Long Season’ transcends its own runtime to become a meditative exploration into the ephemeral moments that bind us together. In mapping out its lyrical contours, we are taken on a back road journey through memory and mood, set against the neon-lit expanse of Tokyo.

To understand ‘Long Season’ is to surrender to its cyclical nature, a repetition that captures the inertia of life’s lost-and-found feelings running in perpetuity. But within the deceptive simplicity of the song’s lyrics, there lies an expansiveness that opens up conversations about the human condition—our longing, our loneliness, and our collective need to connect.

A Fluid Ode to Tokyo Twilight – Parsing the Setting

The beginning lines of ‘Long Season’ serve as an immediate transportation to the bustling streets of Tokyo at dusk. The song creates a sonic panorama that’s intertwined with the city’s geographical nuances—from one corner to the other—evoking a sense of endless possibility amidst urban sprawl. Yet, it’s this very sense of spanning distances that elicits a feeling of quiet intimacy within the vast landscape.

One could argue that Fishmans’ painting of Tokyo is not just about location, but emotional displacement. The mention of running in the city at twilight with another person suggests a unity, a sanctuary within the chaos. Dream and reality collide in these scenes, blurring as half-remembered whispers that echo the duo’s movement through the metropolitan maze.

The Echoes of Melancholic Nostalgia in a Hummed Tune

What is the song you are humming?’ Throughout ‘Long Season,’ this question repeats like a mantra, a musical motif that triggers recollection and retrospection. The hummed tune serves as a memory trigger and encapsulates the bittersweet reality of remembering. The act of humming itself conveys universality—a shared experience that, while unique in its specifics, resonates with the collective consciousness.

It’s the music that plays in the background of our lives, the soundtrack of countless unseen moments. The song captures the elusive nature of memory, where the simplest of melodies can carry the weight of our most profound experiences. The lyrics invite listeners to consider the songs in their own lives that act as vessels for nostalgia, connecting them to the intangible.

Unraveling the Dream within a Dream – The Song’s Concealed Core

The enigmatic heart of ‘Long Season’ lies in the metaphor of the recurring dream. The lyrics repeatedly emphasize the condition of being ‘half in a dream,’ a surreal state that captures the liminality of existing between two worlds. It’s this interstitial zone that Fishmans use as a canvas to illustrate the song’s broader themes of transience and the dichotomy of emotion.

At the crossroads of wakefulness and sleep, memory and reality, longing and solitude, listeners find themselves in a state of reflection. The song invites us to dwell in the liminal, to embrace the flux and the flow that defines life’s very essence. The dream trope within the lyrics is a call to accept life’s duality—the joy and sadness that come with the passage of time.

The Synergy of Words and Music in Crafting Atmosphere

Musically, ‘Long Season’ is a masterpiece of mood, using its sprawling arrangement to evoke the emotional landscape set forth in its lyrics. The instrumentation swirls around the words, building an atmosphere that marries the aural to the lyrical. In doing so, Fishmans crafts a particular ambiance that not only serves the song’s theme but becomes integral to the expression of its message.

The layers of sound, the ebb and flow of rhythm, they too hum along like a tune stuck in the very fabric of the evening air. Whether it be the gentle lull of the melody or the crescendo of rhythm that seemingly runs alongside the protagonist, the music carves out a space that is equal parts comforting and contemplative. This musical symbiosis is vital, drawing the listener deeper into ‘Long Season’s’ sonic dreamscapes.

The Enduring Image – ‘The Thing that Falls from the Back Mirror’

Among the most poignant imagery ‘Long Season’ presents is the recurrent line about something falling from the back mirror. This motif captures the ephemeral nature of memories, moments, and even relationships—objects in the rearview that shrink away, albeit laced with a mélange of emotions. It symbolizes the act of moving forward when tethered to the past, the bitter-sweetness of progress and loss.

The lyrics deliver an emotional punch, juxtaposing the joys and sorrows that line the road of reflection. This contrast—’It seems happy, maybe lonely’—lingers long after the song ends, a memento of the narrative journey. The potency of this imagery lies in its simplicity and universality. In a world steadily advancing, Fishmans remind us of the beauty and pain reflected in life’s rearview mirror.

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