Love Is No Big Truth – Decoding the Melancholic Anthem of Modern Romance


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Kings of Convenience's Love Is No Big Truth at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Strumming the Heartstrings of Reality – The Melancholy of Modern Love
  5. Genetic Puppets on a String – The Biological Undercurrents in Romance
  6. Transient Emotions in a Permanent World – Passion, Hate, and Indifference
  7. The Labyrinth of Solitude – To Conform or to Be Alone?
  8. The Haunting Echoes of Resignation – ‘I’ll never need it again’

Lyrics

All I do is sleep all day and think of you
A memory of the cushion life, I’m clinging to
The image of a mutual one, our haven
The somber chords of our song, the fading
Love is no big truth
Driven by our genes
We are simple selfish beings
A symphony that’s you
Joyously awaking
The ignorant and sleeping

Passion and its brother hate, they come and go
Could easily be made to stay for longer, though
Many people play this game so willingly
Do I have to be like them, or be lonely?

Love is no big truth
Driven by our genes
We are simple selfish beings
A symphony that’s you
Joyously awaking
The ignorant and sleeping

I’ll never need it again, again, again
I’ll never need it again, again, again
I’ll never need it again, again, again
I’ll never need it again, again, again

Full Lyrics

In a world constantly searching for universal truths and profound connections, ‘Love is No Big Truth’ by Kings of Convenience hits a striking chord. This seemingly simple ballad hides layers of complexity beneath a tranquil exterior, offering a reflective deep-dive into the nature of love and human motives. Here, we explore how the song weaves its spellbinding narrative, subtly prompting listeners to question the grand narratives of love that have long been sold to us.

Combining their signature acoustic sound with contemplative lyrics, the Norwegian duo presents their listeners with an introspective journey. The serene melody accompanies a lyrical expedition through love, life’s banalities, and the innate self-centric nature of our species. As we delve into the lyrics of this track, we unlock various interpretations that not only resonate with the heart but also provoke the intellect.

Strumming the Heartstrings of Reality – The Melancholy of Modern Love

The opening lines of ‘Love is No Big Truth’ set a somber tone, capturing an essence of inertia and nostalgia. The lyric ‘All I do is sleep all day and think of you’ paints a picture of someone trapped in the grip of reminiscence, unable to move forward. This lethargy, tied with memories of ‘the cushion life,’ is emblematic of a person clinging to the remnants of a past relationship—a common predicament in the modern age of transient connections.

The Kings of Convenience don’t just stop at depicting the listlessness that accompanies a lost love; they propel forward, nudging us to consider the possibility that what we hold precious may be nothing more than a chemical drive. Insinuating that love is ‘driven by our genes,’ the track broaches a biological determinism that frames our deepest emotions as evolutionary tools for survival, challenging the romance-industrial complex.

Genetic Puppets on a String – The Biological Undercurrents in Romance

As the song continues to unveil its layers, the duo delves into the controversial debate of free will versus genetic predestination. The assertion that ‘we are simple selfish beings’ juxtaposes the idealized view of love as selfless and pure. Instead, the listener is confronted with a reductionist perspective, suggesting that our actions, especially in matters of love, are ultimately self-serving, meant to propagate our genes.

This introspective revelation doesn’t come as a cold scientific claim within the song but rather as a liberating idea. The track challenges you to ponder whether this perceived freedom from grandiose expectations of love could lead to a more genuine and personal understanding of human connections. The ‘symphony that’s you’ both acknowledges our individual complex harmonies and hints at the possibility of personal awakenings outside societal dictates.

Transient Emotions in a Permanent World – Passion, Hate, and Indifference

The poetic interplay between ‘passion and its brother hate’ speaks to the temporary and often interchangeable nature of our emotions. The song suggests that these feelings, though intense, are not the steadfast experiences we yearn for but rather fleeting guests in the human experience. There is a subtle invitation to reflect on the investment of emotions, and whether the stability we often seek is something attainable or even desirable.

The fact that these emotions ‘could easily be made to stay for longer’ hints at the artificiality with which society often perpetuates romantic relationships. Are we to engage in this pretense, or face the daunting prospect of solitude? The choice presented in the song is stark and inescapable, pointing out the paradox of the human condition – our crave for permanent love in an intrinsically ephemeral world.

The Labyrinth of Solitude – To Conform or to Be Alone?

Inherent in the song’s narrative is the existential quandary: should one conform to the collective charade or brave the path of loners? The rhetorical question ‘Do I have to be like them, or be lonely?’ echoes the internal struggle that many face while navigating the waters of love and companionship. The Kings of Convenience articulate a sentiment many dare not voice, revealing the fear and uncertainty that comes with the pursuit of authentic connection amid societal expectations.

When you listen closely, the simplicity of the band’s delivery belies a provocation, urging listeners to weight the price of conformity against the purgatory of solitude. At its core, the song questions the very foundations of societal norms on love and relationships, dismantling the fairytale constructs and facing us with the stark choice between fitting in and maintaining one’s essence amidst the solitude.

The Haunting Echoes of Resignation – ‘I’ll never need it again’

The song closes on a mantra-like repetition, a crescendo of self-declared independence from the concept of the need for love. The line ‘I’ll never need it again’ is both a battle-cry against co-dependency and an acceptance of the potential reality of a life sans the traditional form of love. It’s a stance that’s reflective of a growing feeling among many who question the narrative arc prescribed to us from childhood – the incessant seeking of romantic love to complete one’s life.

What’s intriguing about this repetition is the sense of uncertainty it carries despite its firm words. Is it a declaration of newfound freedom or a comforting lullaby to soothe the fear of an unknown, potentially lonely, future? This open-ended conclusion serves as a mirror, reflecting back the listeners’ own biases and experiences with love, leaving them to discern the true note of finality in the symphony of human emotion the song conducts.

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