Me and the Moon – Unraveling the Emotional Complexity of Self-Discovery


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Something Corporate's Me and the Moon at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Snapshot of Suburban Tragedy: Behind the ‘Good Year for a Murder’
  5. Time’s Relentless March: Seasonal and Reasonal Shifts
  6. The Cry of the Butterfly: A Metaphor for Transformation
  7. Dismantling Suburbia: Challenging the Myth of Domestic Bliss
  8. The Dark Lullaby of the Nighttime Soul: Unraveling the Song’s Hidden Meaning

Lyrics

Its a good year for a murder
She’s prayin’ to Jesus, she’s pulling the trigger
There’s no tears, cause he’s not here
She washes her hands, and she fixes the dinner
But soon they’ll be coming to rush her away
No ones so sure if her crime had a reason

Reasons like seasons
They constantly change
And the seasons of last year
Like reasons have floated away
Away with this spilt milk
Away with this dirty dish water, away
Seventeen years, and all that he gave was a daughter

“It’s me and the moon,” she says
I got no trouble with that
But I am a butterfly, you wouldn’t let me die
“It’s me and the moon,” she says

And it’s over, but just started
The blood stained the carpet
Her heart like a crystal
She’s lucid and departed
A life left behind, she can find in her mind gone away

Away with these nightmares
Away with suburbia
Shake down away
You marry a role (man or and)
You give up your soul til you break down

“It’s me and the moon,” she says
“I got no trouble with that, but I am a butterfly, you wouldn’t let me die”
“It’s me and the moon,” she says

But what do you say we go for a ride?
What do you say we get high?
But I’m so tired of days that feel like the night

“It’s me and the moon,” she says
And I got no trouble with that, but I am a butterfly, you wouldn’t let me die
I am a butterfly, I am a butterfly, I am a butterfly

Full Lyrics

Something Corporate’s ‘Me and the Moon’ is a lyrically rich voyage through the human psyche, juxtaposing despair and revelation against an unforgiving suburban backdrop. The song from their 2001 debut album ‘Leaving Through the Window’ stands out not just for its haunting melody, but for the complex emotions and narrative it evokes.

With the poignancy of a short story, ‘Me and the Moon’ captures a portrait of a woman facing a violent and transformational moment. The poetry of the lyrics unfolds layers of meaning, each lyric a brushstroke painting a picture of loss, identity, and the cathartic struggle for emancipation.

A Snapshot of Suburban Tragedy: Behind the ‘Good Year for a Murder’

The opening line, ‘It’s a good year for a murder,’ immediately thrusts listeners into an unsettling scene wrapped in domestic imagery. The lyrics paint a picture of a woman entangled in a struggle that transcends the physical act suggested. This is a tale of reckoning, capturing the silent screams that echo in the quiet corners of a seemingly mundane existence.

We find a character who confronts the duality of her existence: the Christian morals personified by praying to Jesus, and the visceral human reaction to a life that has confined and defined her. The ‘murder’ is as much about the physical as it is about the spiritual, signaling the death of an identity that she is forced into by her circumstances.

Time’s Relentless March: Seasonal and Reasonal Shifts

The song employs seasons as a metaphor for the ever-changing reasons and justifications people fabricate for their actions. The lyric, ‘Reasons like seasons, they constantly change,’ symbolizes an endless cycle of rationalizations that ebb and flow, much like the woman’s grasp over her own narrative and sense of self.

The ‘seasons of last year’ fading away evokes the passage of time and the evolution of the character’s perspective. It emphasizes the temporary nature of excuses we generate to live with the consequences of our decisions, portraying a protagonist who is coming to terms with the transient fabric of the life she leads.

The Cry of the Butterfly: A Metaphor for Transformation

The poignant refrain, ‘I am a butterfly, you wouldn’t let me die,’ conveys a poignant truth about the protagonist’s longing for metamorphosis. The butterfly, a traditional symbol of change, rebirth, and the beauty that comes from growth, becomes an anthem for the trapped woman’s desire to escape the chrysalis of her mundane and controlled existence.

Her identification with the butterfly signifies a yearning for transcendence and the right to her personal passage, suggesting that she’s been denied the transformative death—a demise of the old self—that would allow her to flourish into something beautiful, free, and true to her own nature.

Dismantling Suburbia: Challenging the Myth of Domestic Bliss

The line, ‘Away with suburbia,’ stands as a bold repudiation of the idyllic American dream that suburbia often represents. The song strips down the veneer of domestic tranquility to reveal a more sinister, suffocating reality experienced by its protagonist.

This forced marriage to a role, the surrender of soul ’til you break down,’ speaks to the systemic chains that bind many to a life of silent desperation. The song critiques societal expectations, the prescribed roles that snuff out individualism and pressure the swim in a sea of homogeneity.

The Dark Lullaby of the Nighttime Soul: Unraveling the Song’s Hidden Meaning

While ‘Me and the Moon’ ostensibly presents a somber narrative, it’s also possible to interpret the song as a battle cry for introspection and the quest to find authenticity amidst a tangle of imposed narratives.

The recurring mention of night and day—’I’m so tired of days that feel like the night’—hones in on the exhaustion with a life devoid of genuine emotional and psychical sunshine. The song becomes a dark lullaby that lulls the listener into a trancelike state to confront the shadows of their own existence.

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