Mexicola by Queens of the Stone Age Lyrics Meaning – Peering Through the Veil of Desert Rock Mystique


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Queens of the Stone Age's Mexicola at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

Setting sun deals hands of gold
There’s velvet eyes in Mexico
Just a fall away and all she said was true
Speak in tongues, speak in lies
Drooling livers, born to die
It’s a wonder that those guns don’t point at you

Oh, oh
Oh, oh

(Keep sayin’) go on, (keep sayin’) go on
(Keep sayin’) you won’t (live forever)
(Keep sayin’) go on, (keep sayin’) go on
(Keep sayin’) you won’t (live forever)

Point and shoot, I know just what you mean
In a world that’s full of shit and gasoline, babe
One dog’s dead, one’s on the phone, just leave a lung or leave it alone
It’s that same old song again, I hate it ’cause it’s true

Oh, oh
Ooh, ooh

(Keep sayin’) go on, (keep sayin’) go on
(Keep sayin’) you won’t (live forever)
(Keep sayin’) go on, (keep sayin’) go on
(Keep sayin’) you won’t (live forever)

Full Lyrics

Amidst the guitar-heavy landscape of desert rock, Queens of the Stone Age stand out as icons of the genre, painting stories with a palette of gritty riffs and dark poetry. ‘Mexicola’, a song from their self-titled debut album, dives into this raw terrain with abandon. It’s a track that at once captures the rough and tumble of the desert and the haunting desolation that comes with it.

The cryptic lyrics by frontman Josh Homme resonate like a heat mirage, offering glimmers of narrative that dissipate upon a closer look. But there is an untamed beauty in these elusive verses, inviting listeners to parse through their visceral imagery and the echoes of self-reflection they incite. Let’s journey through this cacti-laden soundscape to uncover the essence of ‘Mexicola’ and why it continues to captivate the souls of listeners.

Velvet Eyes and Golden Deals: The Allure of the Enigmatic Setup

The opening line of ‘Mexicola’ sets a vivid stage – ‘Setting sun deals hands of gold / There’s velvet eyes in Mexico.’ It’s as if we’re thrust into a noir film staged in the heart of the desert. This evocative scenery wraps listeners in an atmosphere of elusive promises and whispered secrets, possibly hinting at the allure of escapism and the temptations found just over the horizon.

With ‘Just a fall away and all she said was true,’ Homme brings an enigmatic figure into play, a femme fatale whose words are as intoxicating as the locale itself. The imagery is rich with implication – suggesting truths known only once one takes a leap of faith, a theme that speaks to the very nature of risk and reward.

‘Speak in Tongues, Speak in Lies’ – The Labyrinth of Communication

Communication, or the lack thereof, is a recurrent theme in Queens of the Stone Age’s work, and ‘Mexicola’ is no exception. The phrase ‘Speak in tongues, speak in lies’ cuts through the ambiguity to reveal a world where language is corrupted, used to deceive as much as to convey. It shows the muddy waters between what’s said and what’s understood, where truth and lies intermingle freely.

This breakdown in genuine exchange mirrors how often in reality we communicate past each other, with words losing their meaning and intent. The line ‘It’s a wonder that those guns don’t point at you’ then serves as a jarring reminder of the stakes involved when dialogues devolve into deceitful monologues.

The Endless Refrain of Mortality: ‘You Won’t Live Forever’

Nestled within ‘Mexicola’ is a chorus that chants the sobering refrain ‘you won’t live forever.’ Rather than a morbid fixation, it feels like a rallying cry, pushing listeners to break free from inertia and embrace the impermanence of it all. The phrase implores an acknowledgment of life’s fleeting nature, and perhaps, an urging to leave behind the trivial in search of something more substantial.

By repeating this mantra throughout the song, Queens of the Stone Age transforms what could be a nihilistic statement into a liberating realization. It’s a confrontational acceptance of mortality that paradoxically can lead one to find more meaning in the moment.

A Dance with Cynicism: ‘In a World That’s Full of Shit and Gasoline’

‘Point and shoot, I know just what you mean / In a world that’s full of shit and gasoline, babe’ – here, Homme encapsulates the pervasive disillusionment of the era. The sentiment expresses a shared understanding, a cynical rapport that grows among those who navigate a world they perceive as fundamentally flawed and fueled by hypocrisy.

This is a song that doesn’t shy away from expressing contempt for the status quo or the hand that modern society has dealt. The desert serves as an alluring escape from societal confines, but the song suggests that even in those remote confines, one can’t completely elude the world’s pervasive reach.

The Sad Refrain of Truth: Unpacking the Hidden Meaning

Breaking down ‘Mexicola’, we encounter a dichotomy of vibrant desert life against the harshness of reality. There’s this constant, apparent battle with truth, its avoidance, and its unwelcome presence in ‘It’s that same old song again, I hate it ’cause it’s true.’ It suggests that while there may be reprieve in fantasies or intoxication, reality is an old tune that persists, as undeniable and relentless as the desert sun.

The song does not merely paint a picture of despair but also a commentary on human nature’s inclination to avoid harsh truths. Homme captures the essence of this condition not only through words but also through the relentless, driving rhythm of the music – it’s the soundtrack of a chase that inevitably circles back to where it began.

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