Misery Loves Company – Decoding the Visceral Maze of Human Relationships


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Emilie Autumn's Misery Loves Company at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Interpreting the Emotional Paradox: Yes and No, Want and So
  5. The Subtle Art of Modern Cynicism: Hell is Others
  6. An Anthem for the Jaded Heart: You Devil Undercover
  7. The Metaphorical Boredom with the Proverbial ‘Book’
  8. The Provocative Finale: Pray for Me, You Fucker—Defiance or Desperation?

Lyrics

It’s not the time
It’s not the place
I’m just another pretty face
So don’t come any closer
You’re not the first
You’re not the last
How many more?
Don’t even ask
You’re one more dead composer

Do I need you?
Yes and no
Do I want you?
Maybe so
You’re getting warm
You’re getting warm
You’re getting warmer, oh, oh, oh
Did you plan this all along
Did you care if was wrong
Who’s getting warmer now
That I’m gone

Misery loves company
And company loves more
More loves everybody else
But hell is others

Misery loves company
And company loves more
More loves everybody else
But hell is others

I’m not for you
You’re not for me
I’ll kill you first
You wait and see
You devil undercover
You’re not a prince
You’re not a friend
You’re just a child
And in the end
You’re one more selfish lover

Do I need you?
Yes and no
Do I want you?
Maybe so
You’re getting warm
You’re getting warm
You’re getting warmer, oh, oh, oh
Did you plan this all along
Did you care if was wrong
Who’s getting warmer now
That I’m gone

Misery loves company
And company loves more
More loves everybody else
But hell is others

Misery loves company
And company loves more
More loves everybody else
But hell is others

You’re so easy to read
But the book is boring me
You’re so easy to read
But the book is boring
You’re so easy to read
But the book is boring
Boring, boring, boring, boring, boring
Boring me

Pray for me if you want to
Pray for me if you care
Pray for me f your want to
Pray for me if you dare
Pray for me if you want to
Pray for me if you care
Pray for me if you want to
Pray for me you fucker if you fucking dare

Misery loves company
And company loves more
More loves everybody else
But hell is others

Misery loves company
And company loves more
More loves everybody else
But hell is others

Misery loves company
And company loves more
More loves everybody else
But hell is others

Misery loves company
And company loves more
More loves everybody else
But hell is others

Full Lyrics

Emilie Autumn’s ‘Misery Loves Company’ is a multifaceted exploration of human connection, emotional dependency, and individualism—the lyrical equivalent of a barbed-wire embrace. Through her poetic finesse, Autumn unfurls the complexities of our emotional entanglements, crafting a siren song that speaks to the deepest recesses of the struggling soul.

This track from her album ‘Opheliac’ weaves a dark tapestry with threads of gothic, classical, and electronic influence, holding listeners spellbound within its brooding narrative. The haunting melodies and incisive lyrics conspire to create a realm where raw emotion meets the harsh reality of interpersonal relations, exposing the intricate dance between need and disdain.

Interpreting the Emotional Paradox: Yes and No, Want and So

Autumn’s recurring chorus of questioning, ‘Do I need you? Yes and no / Do I want you? Maybe so,’ taps into the universal push and pull of desire and necessity. The contradictions inherent in our relationships echo in this phrase, capturing the uncertainty that often shapes our bonds with others. She effectively delves into this spectrum of emotional conflict, striking a chord with anyone who’s ever felt torn between their heart’s yearnings and the mind’s caution.

These lines dance with the duality of approach and avoidance, encapsulating the maddening warmth that grows as we near something dangerously appealing. Autumn prompts the listener to question whether the character she embodies truly seeks companionship, or if she’s engaged in a perilous game of cat and mouse where the heart is the ultimate prize—or perhaps the victim.

The Subtle Art of Modern Cynicism: Hell is Others

Autumn, through a nuanced demonstration of subtext, invokes Sartre’s existential pondering that ‘Hell is others,’ driving home her examination of misery’s love for company. By repeatedly underscoring this belief, Autumn suggests that our purgatorial existence is shaped by the interactions with those around us. Her careful lyricism suggests that the true torment comes not from solitude but from the inevitable disillusionment within the company we keep.

This mantra-like lyric creates a vortex where listeners are pulled into considering whether the hell Emilie sings of is not a metaphysical realm, but a psychological inferno created and maintained by our relationships and the expectations embedded within them. The concept that ‘more loves everybody else’ captures the essence of a society obsessed with excess and superficial connections, leaving us longing for a depth that remains elusive.

An Anthem for the Jaded Heart: You Devil Undercover

Emilie Autumn adroitly captures the zeitgeist of the weary, those who have endured the merry-go-round of romantic entanglements only to be left disenchanted. By declaring an intense ultimatum, ‘I’ll kill you first / You wait and see,’ she encapsulates the desperation and defensive tactics of someone who has been burned one too many times.

These are not just lyrics; they’re a battle cry of the wounded, a warning shot to the next ‘devil undercover’ who dares tread too close to a heart that’s turned fortress. With this phrase, Autumn encapsulates the fierce independence of a person who has come to equate love with betrayal, and intimacy with the loss of self.

The Metaphorical Boredom with the Proverbial ‘Book’

Autumn’s contempt for the predictable, for the tried and tiresome, resonates in the dismissive repetition, ‘You’re so easy to read / But the book is boring me.’ With these lyrics, she conveys a deep-seated boredom that transcends simple disinterest and permeates the soul with a kind of existential ennui.

Through this cutting chorus, Emilie not only dismisses an uninspiring suitor but also addresses the deeper societal critique. She highlights our collective narrative’s descent into monotony, with each of our stories reading like the one before—predictable and thus ultimately disappointing. The imagery of a book suggests a prewritten destiny, a path so well-trodden that it becomes devoid of excitement and authenticity.

The Provocative Finale: Pray for Me, You Fucker—Defiance or Desperation?

In the latter part of ‘Misery Loves Company,’ Autumn introduces a raw plea, a slicing dialectic of religious reference and profane challenge: ‘Pray for me if you want to / Pray for me if you care /… Pray for me you fucker if you fucking dare.’ This juxtaposition speaks to a rebellious spirit, faced with the ambiguity of desiring aid while scorning the hands that might offer it.

Is it a form of defiance, a sneer at those who watch from a safe vantage, or is it a veiled cry for help from someone too proud or hurt to ask plainly? Autumn leaves the question open-ended, allowing audiences to imbue these lines with their own experiences of frustration and vulnerability, creating a personal connection that resonates deeply within the complexities of human emotion.

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