more – Exploring the Depths of Desire and Dissatisfaction


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Keshi's more at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. When Love Asks for ‘more’: The Inner Turmoil of Giving Too Little
  5. The Dichotomy of the Limelight: Fame and Sacrifice
  6. The Explosion of Emotion: Navigating Through Personal Catastrophe
  7. Unveiling the Hidden Meaning: Nostalgia and the Lure of Lost Innocence
  8. A Closer Look at the Song’s Most Memorable Lines: The Lies We Buy

Lyrics

Said she want more, I’m not enough
Getting low and I think I’m giving up
Baby, come home, I want us
I want us, said I want us
Said she want more, I’m not enough
Getting low and I think I’m giving up
Baby, come home, I want us
I want us, said I want us

Said I gotta get money, swear I still love you
I don’t wanna go but you know that I have to
Touch road, gotta play shows
Crowd go wild for the shit I wrote
But this shit so-so, lose control
Gotta change up everything I know
Better, run ways when you smell that smoke
Better, hold me when my head gon’ blow like

Hasta la vista
Dying to see ya in a dream that I had
Where I sing in arenas
Hasta la vista
Dying to see ya
Baby, it ain’t so bad
When there’s nothing between us

Said she want more, I’m not enough
Getting low and I think I’m giving up
Baby, come home, I want us
I want us, said I want us
Said she want more, I’m not enough
Getting low and I think I’m giving up
Baby, come home, I want us
I want us, said I want us

Gone so fast, all the bad habits
Not gon’ last, better run back, kid
Just so sad, worse than last year
Just might crash, just might crash
Just might

Everybody left except for you and I
She don’t want stories and lullabies
She don’t understand that it’s do or die
Said I can buy it all but it’s all a lie

No trade for the things I lost
No train for the boy that stopped
Run ways into these arms of mine
No trade for the things I lost
No train for the boy that stopped
Run ways into these arms of mine

Said she want more, I’m not enough
Getting low and I think I’m giving up
Baby, come home, I want us
I want us, said I want us
Said she want more, I’m not enough
Getting low and I think I’m giving up
Baby, come home, I want us
I want us, said I want us
Said she want more, I’m not enough
Getting low and I think I’m giving up
Baby, come home, I want us
I want us, said I want us

Full Lyrics

In the pantheon of modern music, Houston-based singer-songwriter Keshi (Casey Luong) has carved out a unique space with his genre-defying sound that blends elements of lo-fi, R&B, and indie. His track ‘more’ is a profound rumination that explores the complexities of love, ambition, and the relentless pursuit of satisfaction against the background of a fleeting digital age.

The raw lyrical vulnerability paired with the ethereal soundscape invites us into a conversation about personal adequacy, the pressures of professional success, and the inhospitable gauntlet of pleasing a partner. Let’s peel back the layers of ‘more’ to uncover the delicate balancing act between the demands of the heart and the call of one’s aspirations.

When Love Asks for ‘more’: The Inner Turmoil of Giving Too Little

The soulful declaration in the refrain, ‘Said she want more, I’m not enough’, encapsulates a deeply felt inadequacy that the protagonist struggles with throughout the song. Keshi’s masterful use of repetition not only emphasizes the sense of yearning for a sense of completeness in the relationship but also mirrors the cyclical thoughts that haunt those who fear they are not fulfilling their partner’s emotional needs.

His confessions are unguarded and resonate with anyone who has ever been in a relationship where they’re constantly striving to measure up to an elusive benchmark of ‘enough.’ It’s a burden that weighs heavily on the artist, potentially signifying a broader commentary on societal expectations of success and masculinity.

The Dichotomy of the Limelight: Fame and Sacrifice

Keshi delves into the dichotomy of his life as an ascending musical talent with the lines ‘Touch road, gotta play shows / Crowd go wild for the shit I wrote.’ This juxtaposition of adoring fans against personal desolation highlights the hollow victory that often accompanies fame. The allure of the limelight is depicted as a double-edged sword, one that causes separation and shoots up expectations.

He candidly opens up about the struggles of balancing a rising career with personal relationships. His lyrics suggest a question likely common among artists: Can one truly succeed without the emotional casualties that result from relentless ambition?

The Explosion of Emotion: Navigating Through Personal Catastrophe

The evocative imagery Keshi employs in the line ‘Better, hold me when my head gon’ blow like’ conveys an impending emotional breakdown that’s poised to erupt. It paints a portrait of someone fighting self-combustion, standing at the precipice of surrender.

Desperation seeps through the words—pleading for care, for salvation—in the tense moments before a crisis. It’s a reminder that, beneath the curated facades of any individual, there’s a raw, turbulent human looking for an anchor in the storm.

Unveiling the Hidden Meaning: Nostalgia and the Lure of Lost Innocence

Symbolism runs deep in ‘more,’ with phrases like ‘Hasta la vista’ imbuing the song with a layer of nostalgic yearning. These words, Spanish for ‘See you later,’ resonate with an implicit goodbye to a naivve past—both in the relationship and in life. The line ‘Dying to see ya in a dream that I had’ parallels this with the fading nature of dreams, suggesting a longing for the rekindling of something pure and untouched by the complexities of contemporary life.

Keshi might be touching on the innate human desire to return to simpler times, when love was untainted by the grime of practical concerns and the pursuit of more seemed needless, all within the space of one’s dreamscape.

A Closer Look at the Song’s Most Memorable Lines: The Lies We Buy

Eliciting a moment of stark honesty, Keshi’s verse ‘Said I can buy it all but it’s all a lie’ uncovers the material fallacies that are often subscribed to as remedial solutions for deeper emotional voids. There’s an acknowledgement of the limitations of wealth and success—no matter the material excess, it cannot compensate for true connection and fulfillment.

The poignant realization that ‘all is a lie’ serves as an awakening, beckoning listeners to ponder on what we seek and why, ultimately framing ‘more’ as a narrative of intrinsic value versus extrinsic accomplishment.

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