Necessary Evil – A Profound Exploration of Lovers’ Paradoxes


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Unknown Mortal Orchestra's Necessary Evil at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Transformational Metaphor: More Than Just Animal Instincts
  5. Self-Doubt and Unworthy Love: A Relatable Disposition
  6. Perceiving the ‘Necessary Evil’ in Love’s Domain
  7. An Ode to Modern Love’s Dichotomy
  8. Between the Verses: A Deeper Dive into the Song’s Hidden Meaning

Lyrics

Transform into the animal you need to
Fly from a destiny infested with chemicals
You need a new drug not invented by the CIA
I wanna be your friend but don’t have the self-control
We’re in love
But I don’t get what you see in me

Lovin’ me could be your fatal flaw
Just hangin’ in here trying to be your
Necessary evil
Necessary evil

Nobody can get a tan in the moonlight
Come on inside, tell me is it just a bit too much?
He drooled on a pillow, it looked like an angel
She hit a blunt but it would not chill her out at all
We’re in love
But she don’t get what I see in her

Lovin’ me could be your fatal flaw
Just hangin’ in here trying to be your
Necessary evil
Necessary evil
Lovin’ me could be your fatal flaw
Just hangin’ in here trying to be your
Necessary evil
Necessary evil

Transform into the animal you need to
Fly from a destiny infested with chemicals
You need a new drug not invented by the CIA
I wanna be your friend but don’t have the self-control
We’re in love
But I don’t get what you see in me

Lovin’ me could be your fatal flaw
Just hangin’ in here trying to be your
Necessary evil
Necessary evil
Lovin’ me could be your fatal flaw
Just hangin’ in here trying to be your
Necessary evil
Necessary evil
Necessary evil
Necessary evil
Necessary evil
Necessary evil
Necessary evil
Necessary evil
Necessary evil

Full Lyrics

There’s a certain sorcery in music that allows it to capture the complexities of the human experience. Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s ‘Necessary Evil,’ a track from their 2015 album ‘Multi-Love,’ serves as a perfect specimen of this enchantment. It encapsulates the entanglement of love, self-doubt, and the quest for personal metamorphosis within its psychedelic melody that sews the riddles of affection into a canvas of rhythmic bliss.

Scratching beneath the surface of ‘Necessary Evil’ reveals a rich tapestry of existential quandary and inescapable truths about the nature of relationships in our modern world. This article dives into the poetic depths of the track, examining the hidden meanings, standout lines, and the overall narrative that makes the song a memorable bookmark in the annals of indie music.

The Transformational Metaphor: More Than Just Animal Instincts

Hidden beneath what might seem like a surreal chorus of ‘Transform into the animal you need to’ is a profound call to the reinvention of self. In the grand narrative of love painted by Unknown Mortal Orchestra, it appears that transformation isn’t merely a whimsical desire but a survival tactic – a defense mechanism to cope with a reality laced with ‘chemicals’, possibly symbolizing toxic relationships or societal influences.

The mention of ‘a new drug not invented by the CIA’ hints at a yearning for authenticity in the ways we heal and connect, veering away from mass-produced solutions to life’s most intimate problems. This line critiques our dependency on external fixes and calls for a pursuit of personal truth in both our spiritual and emotional odysseys.

Self-Doubt and Unworthy Love: A Relatable Disposition

One of the most emotionally charged revelations comes from the confession ‘I wanna be your friend but don’t have the self-control.’ Here, Unknown Mortal Orchestra touches upon the all-too-human feeling of unworthiness, where one struggles to comprehend the love and admiration of another. It’s a candid moment of vulnerability, questioning the very foundations of love and desire.

The recurring phrase ‘But I don’t get what you see in me’ is a reflection on the mysterious nature of attraction and adoration. This line resonates with anyone who’s ever felt undeserving of the love they receive, which can be both a beautiful and haunting realization in the dance of intimacy.

Perceiving the ‘Necessary Evil’ in Love’s Domain

The song’s central motif, ‘Necessary Evil,’ is a complex term that alludes to the darker side of dependency and the less-than-ideal actions we justify in the name of love. This particular phrase suggests that love, with all of its unpredictable dynamics, may entail unfavorable aspects that are nevertheless essential for the relationship’s survival or one’s emotional well-being.

Repeated like a somber incantation, ‘Necessary evil’ evolves from being a mere phrase to a character in its own right, embodying the struggle and acceptance of love’s inherent flaws. Through this lens, the bond between the lovers becomes a dance with shadows, where embracing the worst may be the only way to preserve the best.

An Ode to Modern Love’s Dichotomy

The lyric ‘Nobody can get a tan in the moonlight’ is rife with irony, encapsulating the futility of seeking rewards from sources incapable of providing them. In the context of love, it illustrates the sometimes fruitless yearning for growth or fulfillment in a dynamic that may not nurture one’s desires fully. This line also highlights the duality of modern love, where illumination and shadow interplay in an elusive search for authenticity.

These insightful words echo the internal dialogue many face when entangled in a relationship that defies societal norms or personal expectations. It captures the essence of a love that is simultaneously perplexing and enlightening, a fitting analogy for the ambiguous journey of human connection.

Between the Verses: A Deeper Dive into the Song’s Hidden Meaning

Throughout ‘Necessary Evil,’ the band deftly weaves a narrative of emotional contradiction and self-scrutiny. The evocative imagery allows listeners to infer a deeper commentary on the human condition; love as an agent of chaos and order, as both cure and ailment, as a rite of passage and a trial by fire.

By examining the poetic subtleties of the track, one discovers a landscape where love is both the poison and the antidote, and where the roles of victim and perpetrator become indiscernible. Through its musing tones, ‘Necessary Evil’ captures the postmodern love affair’s essence – one that defies easy definition and lives in the spaces between.

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