On GP by Death Grips Lyrics Meaning – A Deep Dive into Personal Struggle and Existential Rebellion


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Death Grips's On GP at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

I’m fucking tired of all the perks
I’ve tried nothing, everything works
For less I’m worth, I’ve served my bid
All fuck life wasn’t what it is
All fuck life was just a bridge
I seen some free landed some tricks
Far I see high time man quit
Won’t let you know when I get goin’
Phone ring too long

Phone ring too long, I’m probably gone
Ringtone jingle my swan song
I’ll show you how to leave well enough alone
I’m not this world this on cue world
I fall back, concoct new worlds
I fall out in throbbing swirls
I fall until I stop this world
I fall the fuck off this world
I live down the street from you’ve noticed me, I’ve never seen you
Wonder what the fuck I do
Listen up, you nosy bitch, listen close
My most recent purchase, old black rope
Gonna learn how to tie it, hang it in my chamber
Perfect reminder occult I’m made of
Come try it out whenever you wanna
Last night, three thirty in the morning, Death on my front porch
Can feel him itching to take me with him, hail Death, fuck you waiting for?
Like a question no one mention, he turns around, hands me his weapon
He slurs, “use at your discretion, it’s been a pleasure, Stefan”
Head-on like dead, on like grey
Death in your way, not in my way, I got my way
I was in my way, crept out my way, kept out my way
I’m on one like bae you’re on your way, way, way, way

I’m fucking tired of all the perks
I’ve tried nothing, everything works
For less I’m worth, I’ve served my bid
All fuck life wasn’t what it is
All fuck life was just a bridge
I seen some free landed some tricks
Far I see high time man quit
Won’t let you know when I get goin’
Phone ring too long

Don’t you worry, impossible for anything to be a big deal
I’m in no weary, my vital post dated but clearly been ages since life had appeal
Far more than fascination, my second nature chant “kill ’cause I can”
This body by my own hands
My friends and family won’t understand
So I stay in the end, don’t make none to me
If wasn’t for them, I’d make that decision on GP
Had to do it all again, I’d make that decision on GP
All the nights I don’t die for you
Wouldn’t believe how many nights I ain’t died for you on GP
Not that I care, I’d be a liar if I sat here claiming I’d exit in a minute
But I can’t say I wouldn’t I have my limits

Full Lyrics

The visceral force that is Death Grips has once again cut through the noise, delivering a track that’s as enigmatic as it is poignant. ‘On GP,’ standing for ‘On General Principle,’ from their 2015 album ‘The Powers That B,’ isn’t just another entry in the group’s discography—it’s a gut-wrenching introspection wrapped in the chaotic energy we’ve come to expect from the trio.

On its surface, ‘On GP’ is a labyrinth of industrial beats and lyrical daggers thrown by frontman Stefan Burnett, aka MC Ride. But delve deeper into the narrative, and it becomes clear that there’s a heavy, contemplative heart beating at the core of this sonic fever dream. It’s a confrontation with existence itself, channeled through the abrasive textures that have become Death Grips’ hallmark.

A Portrait of the Artist as a Desperate Man

From the get-go, ‘On GP’ paints a self-portrait of an artist wrestling with existential dread. The opening lines reveal a sense of defeat, as though every coping mechanism has failed and only raw emptiness remains. Burnett’s confession of being ‘fucking tired of all the perks’ sets a tone of disillusionment that is palpable throughout the song.

‘I’ve tried nothing, everything works,’ he laments, implying a profound apathy and a loss of meaning in the ‘perks’ that life has to offer. It’s a nihilistic declaration that in the grand scheme of things, his actions—or lack thereof—bear no weight on the outcome.

The Dance with Death: A Rebellious Tête-à-Tête

Burnett peppers the song with a disquieting imagery that personifies Death not as a distant, abstract concept but as a palpable presence ‘on my front porch.’ It’s a bold, blasphemous bravado as he recounts the intimate encounter, where Death hands him a weapon and ambiguously implores, ‘it’s been a pleasure, Stefan.’

The weapon is a symbol simultaneously of autonomy and annihilation, a tool that gives the holder the power to define his fate. But with this power comes an underlying sense of dread, a tacit acknowledgment of the susceptibility to self-destruction.

Unraveling the Song’s Hidden Meaning: Life’s Tightrope

Though shrouded in metaphors, ‘On GP’ is a profound meditation on life’s delicate balance. The song can be read as a debate about the fringe between living and ceasing to exist—where ‘All fuck life wasn’t what it is’ could suggest that the presumed beauty of life often fails to live up to its billing.

Each verse swings like a pendulum between pursuit of purpose and the temptation to let go. The ‘old black rope’ and other mentions border on being morbid props in a play where Burnett is both the tragic protagonist and the contemplative playwright.

Exploring the Abyss: A Memorable Lyrical Labyrinth

The recurrent motif of ringing phones serves as an eerie reminder of connectivity to a world that the narrator seems eager to escape from. ‘Don’t you worry, impossible for anything to be a big deal,’ speaks volumes about detachment and heightened indifference. It’s a declaration of the singer’s comfort with the prospect of oblivion, an existential shrug.

‘Far more than fascination, my second nature chant “kill ’cause I can”‘ reveals an internal struggle, an innate call to self-destruction wrestling against the societal norm of preservation.

The Profound Admission: Sacrifice ‘On General Principle’

At its core, ‘On GP’ is about the crucial choices we all wrestle with, borne out of a direct and sobering line: ‘If wasn’t for them, I’d make that decision on GP.’ It is here that we unearth the track’s central struggle—the consideration of ending one’s life as a sacrificial act for the sake of friends and family.

Burnett acknowledges the thin line he treads, recognizing that it’s the principle of love and care for his close ones that keeps him from making an irreversible choice. These lines are Burnett at his most transparent, revealing the burdens of his persona and the expectations he feels pressing upon him.

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