Something Super Sweet – Dissecting the Surgeons of Heartbreak


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Rory Webley's Something Super Sweet at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Metaphoric Mastery: The Art of Musical Surgery
  5. The Poison Dressed as Medicine: Analyzing the ‘Sugar Pills’
  6. Do Not Resuscitate: Embracing the End of an Era
  7. Reanimation Regrets: The Frankensteinian Fear of Forced Revivals
  8. Memorable Lines: The Counting of Final Moments

Lyrics

You keep telling me that we can fix this
But we can’t, the scalpel in your hand
Is only gonna cut me again
And I don’t wanna take that chance

Some things, they just don’t last
You can’t get a prescription for that
Quit shoving these sugar pills down my throat
Cause I’m starting to choke

Stop, don’t resuscitate
Please don’t, don’t hesitate
Just let it die, we’ve had our time
We’ll be alright

But then you give me ten CC’s of something super sweet
Yeah, you put me to sleep
I’m getting drowsy
My eyelids are getting heavy
Kiss me on the cheek
Then you’re telling me

Count down from ten
Ten, nine, eight
Seven, six
Five, four, three, two, one
When you rip my heart out
Please put it back when you’re done
I’m too young for this open-heart surgery
There’s stuffing in the place where my heart’s meant to be
Why me?

You keep telling me that we’ll get past this
But we’re never gonna last
So just quit blasting me with your electrotherapy
And let’s move past this

These things, they come alive in a flash
Sometimes, they die just as fast
Didn’t Frankenstein teach you anything?
Don’t revive dead things

Stop, don’t resuscitate
Please don’t, don’t hesitate
Just let it die, we’ve had our time
We’ll be alright

But then you give me ten CC’s of something super sweet
Yeah, you put me to sleep
I’m getting drowsy
My eyelids are getting heavy
Kiss me on the cheek
Then you’re telling me

Count down from ten
Ten, nine, eight
Seven, six
Five, four, three, two, one
When you rip my heart out
Please put it back when you’re done
I’m too young for this open-heart surgery
There’s stuffing in the place where my heart’s meant to be
Why me?

Now I’m coming down from my high
And something just doesn’t feel right
Yeah, the anesthetic’s wearing off
And I’m starting to feel what I’ve lost
There’s stuffing in the place where my heart was

But then you give me ten CC’s of something super sweet
Yeah, you put me to sleep
I’m getting drowsy
My eyelids are getting heavy
Kiss me on the cheek
Then you’re telling me

Count down from ten
Ten, nine, eight
Seven, six
Five, four, three, two, one
When you rip my heart out
Please put it back when you’re done
I’m too young for this open-heart surgery
There’s stuffing in the place where my heart’s meant to be
Why me?

Full Lyrics

Rory Webley’s latest track ‘Something Super Sweet’ is a piercing examination of heartbreak wrapped in deceptively catchy melodies. With Webley’s haunting vocals and raw lyricism, listeners find themselves on a surgical table of emotions, dissecting the intricacies of a love that’s enduring an invasive and ultimately futile procedure to save its fading pulse.

This song is not just another run-of-the-mill break-up anthem; it’s a deeply personal and vivid portrayal of trying to mend a terminally ill relationship using desperate measures that only prolong the pain. Webley’s artistic choices in depicting this struggle leave a bittersweet taste, mirroring the ‘something super sweet’ referenced in the hook.

Metaphoric Mastery: The Art of Musical Surgery

Rory Webley doesn’t shy away from the scalpel when it comes to lyricism. The opening lines plunge the listener straight into an operating theatre of love, where attempts to salvage a dying relationship are as futile and painful as misguided surgery. The scalpel, a metaphor for the efforts to fix what’s damaged, becomes an instrument of inevitable harm.

The choice of this vivid imagery sets a tone that’s both sterile and emotionally charged, encapsulating the paradox of trying to repair a bond while causing further damage. Webley’s genius lies in how he turns a healing tool into a symbol of recurring hurt, inviting a contemplation of whether some breaks can—or should—be mended.

The Poison Dressed as Medicine: Analyzing the ‘Sugar Pills’

Webley introduces the concept of ‘sugar pills’, a placebo meant to offer hope without substantive healing properties, framing the empty reassurances often found in troubled relationships. The lyrics speak to the deception of easy fixes, sweet lies that serve to placate rather than heal.

This metaphor extends beyond the physical to the emotional deception we sometimes accept out of a desperate need for comfort. Webley captures the choking hazard of swallowing hollow promises, amplifying the dangerous side effects of relying on false cures.

Do Not Resuscitate: Embracing the End of an Era

In an era where letting things go is increasingly seen as giving up, Webley stands as a voice of reason. His insistent plea of ‘Stop, don’t resuscitate’ is a cry for acceptance that some things are beyond saving. It is a declaration of the need to let go, to not hesitate, and allow the natural death of a relationship.

This powerful statement resonates with anyone who has clung to the vestiges of a once-vibrant connection, only to realize the beauty of its time has passed. The artist encourages listeners to acknowledge that sometimes, it’s healthier to be alright with ‘death’ than attempt an artificial revival.

Reanimation Regrets: The Frankensteinian Fear of Forced Revivals

Webley’s narrative touches on the gothic horror of reanimating that which should remain dead. He poses the haunting question – did Frankenstein not teach humanity the perils of reviving what’s been lost? These lines suggest parallels between the monster’s revival and the unnatural resuscitation of a relationship.

The singer cautions against the monstrosities created from such acts, those emotional abominations that surface when love is artificially sustained. He adeptly reminds the listener that life, in all forms, should have its natural ebb and flow, and that includes the life cycles of our relationships.

Memorable Lines: The Counting of Final Moments

Webley’s creative countdown from ten solidifies this song in the hearts of its audience. Each descending number mirrors the sinking realization that each attempt to stitch the relationship back together is another tear at the seams of one’s heart.

The poignant request, ‘When you rip my heart out / Please put it back when you’re done,’ resonates as a powerful statement of innocence and vulnerability. It captures the essence of the song – a plea for mercy from the naive and a question that lingers long after the music fades: Why me?

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