Strutter – Decoding the Anthem of Unattainable Desire


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Kiss's Strutter at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Siren in Satin: The Strutter’s Allure
  5. Beneath the Glitter: The Song’s Hidden Commentary
  6. The Telltale Chorus: Echoes of Unmet Longing
  7. Memorable Lines and the Mirror of Rock Stardom
  8. Why ‘Strutter’ Endures: The Cult of Charisma

Lyrics

I know a thing or two about her
I know she’ll only make you cry
She’ll let you walk the street beside her
But when she wants, she’ll pass you by

Everybody says she’s lookin’ good
And the lady knows it’s understood
Strutter

She wears her satins like a lady
She gets her way just like a child
You take her home and she says maybe, baby
She takes you down and drives you wild

Everybody says she’s lookin’ good
And the lady knows it’s understood
Strutter

I know a thing or two about her
I know she’ll only make you cry
She’ll let you walk the street beside her
But when she wants, she’ll pass you by

Everybody says she’s lookin’ good
And the lady knows it’s understood

Strutter
Strutter
Strutter

Full Lyrics

Amidst a backdrop of glam-rock riffs and face paint, Kiss’s ‘Strutter’ emerges as an evocative anthem that goes beyond mere theatrics to strike at the heart of unattainable desire. First appearing on their eponymous debut album in 1974, the song combines Gene Simmons’ growling bass lines with Paul Stanley’s charismatic vocals to spin the tale of a woman whose allure is matched only by her aloofness.

Unpacking ‘Strutter’ reveals a layered narrative that speaks to the complex interplay of attraction, vanity, and the timelessly mystifying dance between want and untouchability. Dive into the swaggering world of a Kiss classic, and explore the intricate weavings of lyric and sound that keep fans strutting back for more.

A Siren in Satin: The Strutter’s Allure

The woman at the center of ‘Strutter’ is depicted as a paragon of confidence and desirability. Her strategic use of fashion—it’s no accident that she ‘wears her satins like a lady’—signifies an awareness of her charm and the effect it has on those around her. In wielding her femininity like a finely-tuned instrument, the Strutter knows exactly how to get her way.

Moreover, the precision with which she navigates her relationships—giving enough to pique interest but withholding enough to maintain her mystique—signals a potent combination of self-possession and manipulation. It’s a dynamic that plays out time and again in the realms of romance and rock ‘n’ roll alike.

Beneath the Glitter: The Song’s Hidden Commentary

While on the surface ‘Strutter’ may seem to extoll the sheer physical grandeur of its titular character, a closer listen suggests a critique of superficiality and the pitfalls of vanity. The Strutter’s actions are a performance, with each step calculated for effect—a sentiment that Kiss, with their makeup and showmanship, knew all too well.

The song also subtly touches on the double-edged sword of desire. The narrator is all too aware of the futility of his longing, foreshadowing the heartache that inevitably accompanies the pursuit of that which is always just out of reach. This undercurrent of futility lends the song a melancholic depth.

The Telltale Chorus: Echoes of Unmet Longing

With a simple chorus that hammers home the Strutter’s reputation, Kiss distills the essence of her character into a potent refrain. The repetition of ‘Everybody says she’s lookin’ good, and the lady knows it’s understood’ isn’t just a nod to her physical attributes—it’s an acknowledgment of her social power.

These lines speak volumes about the potent cocktail of admiration and resentment that the Strutter inspires in her onlookers. The agreement that ‘she’s lookin’ good’ isn’t mere appreciation; it’s a communal recognition of the game she’s playing. And the acknowledgment that ‘the lady knows’ is a testament to her savvy in wielding her assets.

Memorable Lines and the Mirror of Rock Stardom

The lyrics are rife with memorable lines that resonate with the band’s own experiences in the rock sphere. ‘You take her home and she says maybe, baby’ encapsulates the push-and-pull of rock star relationships, oscillating between public bravado and private uncertainties.

In many ways, ‘Strutter’ can be read as a reflection of Kiss’s own path to fame—a path marked by enthralling performances whose goal is to seduce the crowd while retaining an air of mystery and distance. The Strutter, in all her frustrating enigma, is not unlike the rock stars who sing of her.

Why ‘Strutter’ Endures: The Cult of Charisma

The staying power of ‘Strutter’ is a testament to Kiss’s skill in crafting songs that go beyond the superficialities of rock ‘n’ roll excess to comment on the human condition. The Strutter is as relevant today as she was in the ’70s—a symbol of the timeless human fascination with charisma and the allure of the elusive.

This track, much like the band itself, thrives on the larger-than-life spectacle while delving into the nuanced psyche beneath the surface. Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley created not just a song but an archetype, one that continues to strut across the cultural consciousness with every guitar lick and drumbeat.

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