Take Aim – Unveiling the Anthem of Escapism


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Kasabian's Take Aim at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Rock Ballad Reinterpreted: The Melancholy of Missing Freedom
  5. Societal Chains and the Quiet Rebellion
  6. The Heart of Resistance: A Journey Through Hidden Meaning
  7. Crescendos of Desperation: Most Memorable Lines
  8. Elegy to the End: A Goodbye or a New Beginning?

Lyrics

Nightmares, oh nightmares come on now
Getting my days all wrong now
Risen from prison an outlaw
Spending our time in the lion’s jaw
In the end you sink or swim, I’m eager, I’m eager

Loving, more loving, come on now
Socially biting your tongue now
Run down, oh run down old houses
Feeding the cats to the mouses

Oh take aim now, oh take aim now
Can you see me in the way now?
Oh take aim now, oh take aim now
Gotta get us out of here

Drop them and give them star prizes
Lock them away in high rises
Held off and called on by truncheons
Rattling keys to the dungeons

Oh take aim now, oh take aim now
Can you see me in the way now?
Oh take aim now, oh take aim now
Gotta get us out of here

Don’t take me over
I bid you all farewell, I’ve got to leave
Tears on my shovel
Switch me off today

Oh take aim now, oh take aim now
Can you see me in the way now?
Oh take aim now, oh take aim now
Gotta get us out of here

Oh take aim now, oh take aim now
Can you see me in the way now?
Oh take aim now, oh take aim now
Gotta get us out of here

Don’t take me over
I bid you all farewell, I’ve got to leave

Full Lyrics

Kasabian’s ‘Take Aim’ is not merely a wistful track tucked away in the middle of their 2009 album ‘West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum’. It’s an odyssey of liberation, a complex narrative layered with social commentary and the universal struggle for autonomy set to the band’s signature fusion of electronica and rock.

While the song at first glance appears to be a straightforward cry against restriction and a plea for self-determination, a closer inspection reveals an intricate tapestry of resistance, societal critique, and personal agency. Kasabian has constructed an existential battleground, where the fight to escape the mundane becomes an all-consuming mission.

A Rock Ballad Reinterpreted: The Melancholy of Missing Freedom

The opening lines of ‘Take Aim’ whisper of nightmares and dislocated routines, irresistibly drawing the listener into a state of disarray. This existential disarray mirrors our common moments of feeling out of step with the world, particularly poignant in a postmodern society that often feels cyclical and relentlessly oppressive.

Kasabian artfully weaves this sensation with references to the outlaw archetype—an evocative symbol of rebellion and refusal to conform. When they speak of spending ‘time in the lion’s jaw,’ there is an acute sense of urgency and danger that belies the day-to-day struggle against existential ennui.

Societal Chains and the Quiet Rebellion

The second verse takes a sharp turn towards social reality, discussing the mundane practice of ‘socially biting your tongue’. In these lines lie a critique of the system that necessitates self-censorship and conformity. Run down houses become metaphors for decayed societal constructs that allow the suppressed (represented as ‘mouses’) to be subjected to the dominant force (the ‘cats’).

Kasabian isn’t just singing about physical confines but also of intellectual and societal ones. Their call to ‘take aim’ becomes a battle cry against the structural inequalities and challenges associated with urban life, from ‘star prizes’ that distract to ‘high rises’ that imprison.

The Heart of Resistance: A Journey Through Hidden Meaning

To grasp the song’s hidden meaning, one must understand Kasabian’s flirtation with paradox. The repeated calls to ‘take aim’ paired with the impassive ‘can you see me in the way now?’ can be interpreted as a struggle for visibility and acknowledgment in a crowded, indifferent world.

The band challenges listeners to become the unnamed marksman in this anthem of resistance. Each chorus is a pledge, and it carries the weight of a desperate need for change—the ‘get us out of here’ is a universal appeal to break free from societal restrictions regardless of form.

Crescendos of Desperation: Most Memorable Lines

Tears on my shovel, switch me off today.’ This haunting imagery is perhaps the most striking. It speaks of the toil and emotional toll taken by the fight for autonomy and the desire to be ‘switched off,’ to find peace away from the relentless pursuit of freedom.

These lines encapsulate the exhaustion one feels when battling against a system seemingly designed to suppress individualism and dissent. They are a mournful recognition of the sometimes Sisyphean task of personal liberation.

Elegy to the End: A Goodbye or a New Beginning?

As the song fades with the lines ‘Don’t take me over, I bid you all farewell, I’ve got to leave,’ Kasabian leaves us with a tender yet poignant farewell—a final act of taking control of one’s destiny even when overwhelmed by the enormity of the struggle.

‘Take Aim’ thus becomes not just a song but a symbol, an encapsulation of the fight against complacency and the celebration of the human spirit’s relentless quest to find meaning, freedom, and ultimately, a sense of self-worth in an often bewildering world.

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