The Bidding – Unveiling the Auction of Affections in Modern Love


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Tally Hall's The Bidding at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. An Emotional Economy: The Bidding as a Metaphor for Modern Romance
  5. Selling the Self: Lyrics That Depict the Disillusionment with Identity
  6. Unearthing the Hidden Meaning: Love’s Auction and One’s Self-Worth
  7. ‘Going Twice, Going Thrice’: The Scrutiny of Love’s Stakes
  8. Memorable Verses: The Lingering Echo of a Buyer’s Remorse

Lyrics

I’ve been sleeping in a cardboard box
Spending every dollar at the liquor shop
And even though I know I haven’t got a lot
I’ll try to give you love until the day you drop

I’ve been training like a Pavlov dog
Let my independence out to take a hike
All you got to do is activate my bell
And I’ll fetch you anything you like

Going once, going twice
Every man here has a price
Over where? Over there, sold
To not a single lady in here

I’ve been in like a thousand times
Dated every woman in the atmosphere
I’ve been to every continent
Broken all the hearts in every hemisphere
And if I’m not the type of guy you like to circumvent
Just remember not to love me when I disa-

I graduated at the top
I like to take advantage of the bourgeoisie
So if you have a fantasy of being a queen
Maybe you should blow a couple bucks on me

Going once, going twice
Won’t these gentlemen suffice
Any here? Any there?
Any motions anywhere?
Going twice going thrice
Guess this means we’ll go four times a lady

I promise I’ll be all you’ll need, ever need
You’ll never have to shop around (don’t shop around)
And I’ll give you all you’ll ever need, ever need
Don’t worry I will never let you down, let you down
Don’t worry I will never let you down

So many ladies are wanting for mates
And the prospects are good but the date’s never great
Over here over there over where? Anywhere
They’re too busy with winning the bidding to care
And he’s sold

Full Lyrics

Tally Hall’s ‘The Bidding,’ a track filled with clever wordplay and upbeat pop-rock cadence, disguises a profound examination of contemporary relationships under its seemingly whimsical surface. The song, with its catchy tune and quirky lyrics, demands a second look beyond its merry rhythm to uncover the striking commentary on the commodification of love and human connections.

Let’s delve into the lyrical labyrinth of ‘The Bidding’ and excavate the layers of meaning Tally Hall has interwoven through its verses. From the satirical stanzas to the poignant proclamations, the song is an odyssey that catalogues the desperate attempts of a protagonist trying to invest in love as if it were a market transaction, ensnaring listeners in a melodic meditation on attachment and value.

An Emotional Economy: The Bidding as a Metaphor for Modern Romance

The songinitiates listeners into a world where love is merchandised, echoing society’s inclination to put a price on the invaluable. Verses like ‘I’ve been training like a Pavlov dog’ and ‘Every man here has a price’ convey a scenario where affection is not spontaneous but conditioned, where relationships are auctioned to the highest bidder – a stark metaphor for the transactional nature of modern dating.

This allegorical marketplace where one’s worth is determined by economic or social capital evokes a sense of the person’s desperation to find connection. The protagonist’s willingness to ‘try to give you love until the day you drop’ suggests a relentless pursuit of affection, challenging the listener to question the depth and authenticity of emotions commoditized and traded.

Selling the Self: Lyrics That Depict the Disillusionment with Identity

In the digital age of curated personas, ‘The Bidding’ might also reflect the self-marketing that typifies online presence. ‘I graduated at the top’ and ‘Maybe you should blow a couple bucks on me’ can be interpreted as the boastful advertisements we construct in our social profiles, seeking validation and companionship.

Like a product in glittering packaging, the narrator presents himself as a prime choice, a trophy for the taking, yet the incessant self-promotion reveals underlying insecurity. Through a tale of personal exposure, one is left wondering if anyone truly notices the human beneath the banner ads of self-promotion.

Unearthing the Hidden Meaning: Love’s Auction and One’s Self-Worth

At the heart of ‘The Bidding’ lies a cryptic critique of how self-esteem is devalued in the carnival of courtship. The refrain ‘Going once, going twice’ is a chant that resonates with anyone who’s felt undervalued, be it in love or life, signifying the erosion of self when placed upon the auction block.

Tally Hall deftly unwraps the pervasive loneliness camouflaged by the protagonist’s show of bravado. The line ‘to not a single lady in here’ lands as a somber admission amidst the bidding war, highlighting the protagonist’s realization of his own irrelevance in the grand scheme of human connection.

‘Going Twice, Going Thrice’: The Scrutiny of Love’s Stakes

The repetition and evolution of the auctioneer’s call epitomize the frantic escalation in the pursuit for companionship. ‘Going twice going thrice’ exceeds beyond just the increase in stakes or desperation; it echoes the repetitious nature of seeking validation in a world where genuine connections are scant.

With each stanza’s closing bid, listeners are reminded of the transactional relationships facilitated by the anonymity of modern social spaces – where deep connections are auctioned off piecemeal, with ever-increasing stakes and ever-diminishing returns on emotional investment.

Memorable Verses: The Lingering Echo of a Buyer’s Remorse

‘I promise I’ll be all you’ll need, ever need’ stands as a poignant promise in an ephemeral world. These words, supposed to affirm commitment, feel more like a product guarantee, hinting at an underlying fear of abandonment and betrayal.

The song then crescendos to the valedictory pledge, ‘Don’t worry I will never let you down,’ which reverberates as both an assertion and a plea. In this promise, the finality of ‘let you down’ resonates with a haunting ambivalence – a blend of adamant assurance and the preemptive tinge of buyer’s remorse that may accompany any transaction, especially those of the heart.

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