Thrift Shop – Unpacking the Cultural Thrift Phenomenon


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Macklemore & Ryan Lewis feat. Wanz's Thrift Shop at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Anti-Blowout: Thrift as a Lifestyle Revolution
  5. Dissecting the Dollars: A Critique of Consumer Culture
  6. Redefining Swagger: The Allure of the Eclectic Ensemble
  7. Between the Lines: Beyond Shopping, a Reflection of Self
  8. Linguistic Loot: The Memorable Lines That Defined a Movement

Lyrics

Hey Macklemore? can we go thrift shopping?

What, what, what, what

What, what, what, what

What, what, what, what

What, what, what, what

What, what, what, what

What, what, what, what

What, what, what, what

What, what, what, what

I’m gonna pop some tags

Only got twenty dollars in my pocket

I – I – I’m hunting, looking for a come-up

This is fucking awesome

Nah Walk up to the club like, What up, I got a big cock!

I’m just pumped, just bought some shit from the thrift shop

Ice on the fringe, it’s so damn frosty

The people like, Damn! That’s a cold ass honkey.

Rollin’ in, hella deep, headin’ to the mezzanine

Dressed in all pink, ‘cept my gator shoes, those are green

Draped in a leopard mink, girls standin’ next to me

Probably shoulda washed this, smells like R. Kelly’s sheets

(Piss)

But shit, it was ninety-nine cents! (Bag it) Coppin’ it, washin’ it

‘Bout to go and get some compliments

Passin’ up on those moccasins someone else’s been walkin’ in them

Bummy and grungy, fuck it man, I am stuntin’ and flossin’ and

And savin’ my money and I’m hella happy that’s a bargain, bitch

I’ma take your grandpa’s style, I’ma take your grandpa’s style

No for real ask your grandpa can I have his hand-me-downs?

(Thank you) Velour jumpsuit and some house slippers

Dookie brown leather jacket that I found diggin’

They had a broken keyboard, I bought a broken keyboard

I bought a skeet blanket, and then I bought a kneeboard

Hello, hello, my ace man, my Miller

John Wayne ain’t got nothing on my fringe game, hell no

I could take some Pro Wings, make them cool, sell those

The sneaker heads would be like Aw, he got the Velcros

I’m gonna pop some tags

Only got twenty dollars in my pocket

I – I – I’m hunting, looking for a come-up

This is fucking awesome

I’m gonna pop some tags

Only got twenty dollars in my pocket

I – I – I’m hunting, looking for a come-up

This is fucking awesome

What you know about rockin’ a wolf on your noggin?

What you knowin’ about wearin’ a fur fox skin?

I’m digging, I’m digging, I’m searching right through that luggage

One man’s trash, that’s another man’s come up

Thank your granddad for donating that plaid button-up shirt

‘Cause right now I’m up in her skirt

I’m at the Goodwill, you can find me in the (Uptons)

I’m that, I’m that sucker searchin’ in that section (Uptons)

Your grammy, your aunty, your momma, your mammy

I’ll take those flannel zebra jammies, second-hand, I rock that motherfucker

The built-in onesie with the socks on that motherfucker

I hit the party and they stop in that motherfucker

They be like, Oh, that Gucci. That’s hella tight

I’m like, Yo that’s fifty dollars for a T-shirt

Limited edition, let’s do some simple addition

Fifty dollars for a T-shirt, that’s just some ignorant bitch (Shit)

I call that getting swindled and pimped (Shit)

I call that getting tricked by a business

That shirt’s hella dope

And having the same one as six other people in this club is a hella don’t

Peep game, come take a look through my telescope

Trying to get girls from a brand? Then you hella won’t

Then you hella won’t

(Goodwill, poppin’ tags, yeah!)

I’m gonna pop some tags

Only got twenty dollars in my pocket

I – I – I’m hunting, looking for a come-up

This is fucking awesome

I wear your granddad’s clothes

I look incredible

I’m in this big ass coat

From that thrift shop down the road

I wear your granddad’s clothes

I look incredible

I’m in this big ass coat

From that thrift shop down the road

I’m gonna pop some tags

Only got twenty dollars in my pocket

I – I – I’m hunting, looking for a come-up

This is fucking awesome

Is that your grandma’s coat?

Full Lyrics

Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’s ‘Thrift Shop’ featuring Wanz wasn’t just a chart-topping hit—it was a cultural moment that reverberated through the fashion ethos and commentary on consumerism. Tapping into the zeitgeist of the early 2010s, the song was more than a catchy hook and an infectious beat; it stood as a beacon illuminating an undercurrent of social, economic, and cultural themes.

Beneath the surface, the lyrics carry weight, challenging the status quo of consumption and what it means to be ‘fly.’ Its message is draped in humor and a carefree melody, yet the crux of the conversation it sparks is deeply ingrained in our contemporary behavior—’Thrift Shop’ exposes the listener to a frugalist manifesto set against the superficial glamor of the music industry.

The Anti-Blowout: Thrift as a Lifestyle Revolution

Macklemore’s verses juxtapose the glitzy life of mainstream hip-hop with that of a frugal hipster—never more poignantly delivered than when he boasts about his $0.99 fur coat. Through humor and sarcasm, the lyrics contest the high-price tags and fleeting status that high-fashion brands offer, proposing instead an almost rebellious satisfaction in finding unique apparel in the disregarded aisles of a thrift shop.

Moreover, ‘Thrift Shop’ embraces an eco-conscious attitude before it was mainstream, championing recycling and reusing in an era where fast fashion began to face backlash for its environmental impact. It’s a clever mix of individualism and environmentalism packed into an irresistible beat.

Dissecting the Dollars: A Critique of Consumer Culture

With every ‘I’m gonna pop some tags’ chorus, the song isn’t merely celebrating frugal shopping; it’s a direct critique on how society places value. The lyrics express disdain for spending exorbitant amounts on branded ‘limited edition’ items, calling out ‘getting tricked by a business’—a sentiment that resonates with those tired of the consumer hampster-wheel, urging to look beyond labels for personal and economic satisfaction.

This mockery of excess is complemented by a down-to-earth sense of what matters when dressing oneself. It’s a lesson in economics as much as it’s an anthem for those disillusioned by the brand-induced hierarchy—it champions worth beyond price tags.

Redefining Swagger: The Allure of the Eclectic Ensemble

Macklemore’s unexpected fashion items—a ‘velour jumpsuit’ or ‘grandpa’s style’ —subvert common expectations of hip-hop glitz. By contrasting these choices with what’s typically venerated in his genre, he’s flipping the script on what it means to have ‘swagger.’

‘Thrift Shop’ makes the case for individualism through appearance, honoring a mix-and-match aesthetic that pulls from various styles and periods. It’s a thrifty antidote to the monotonous brand uniformity, replacing it with a more personal patchwork identity.

Between the Lines: Beyond Shopping, a Reflection of Self

The song’s hidden meaning lies deeper than ‘popping tags.’ It’s a meditation on identity in a consumer society. By flaunting thrifted items with pride, Macklemore transforms thrifting into an act of self-expression, democratically accessible and unrestricted by economic barriers.

In the larger cultural discourse, ‘Thrift Shop’ has become a symbolic shrug to materialism’s tight grip, suggesting that self-worth isn’t defined by possessions but by creativity and the ability to repurpose and reimagine the function of material goods. It’s a liberation anthem for the resourceful.

Linguistic Loot: The Memorable Lines That Defined a Movement

Lines like ‘I wear your granddad’s clothes, I look incredible’ are etched into the songs of the decade. This memorable hook encapsulates the song’s appeal—an irresistible blend of cheekiness and charm that compels the listener to reconsider their fashion choices.

Furthermore, the song’s quotability turned it into a viral sensation, bridging the gap between music and meme culture. Each line functions as a crafty catchphrase, catchy enough to spread the song’s underlying message to a global audience. Through wit and wordplay, ‘Thrift Shop’ cements itself as a cultural lexicon for the money-conscious maverick.

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