Translating the Name – Delving into the Depths of Emotional Anguish


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Saosin's Translating the Name at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Visceral Echoes of a Haunted Past
  5. Dissecting the Sound of Severed Ties
  6. Unraveling the Cryptic Walk of Shame
  7. The Seismic Sentiments of Midnight Reverie
  8. The Explosive Finale of Promises and Penance

Lyrics

Oh start, send me grieves and before breathing
I have your voice on tape in a southern accent screaming at me
I was only one and we weren’t prepared for people screaming.
(I have your voice on tape in a southern accent screaming at me)

Know things look lovely to you
Holding back, now and forever sweetheart
Know things look lovely lonely boy
Holding for midnight and I deny
You were walking so peculiar like you had something to hide (still so deadly)[x2]
Sweet penance for a sound – it might explode in our hands

I’m falling in a brown pigmentation of
Where the element marked cut short, turned in and stopped
I’ve been watching rose giving in that’s when I started savoring the sound
I’ve been watching rose give in to it severing the ties between mother and son [x2]

Know things look lovely to you
Holding back, now and forever sweetheart
Know things look lovely lonely boy
Holding for midnight and I deny
You were walking so peculiar like you had something to hide(still so deadly)[x2]
Sweet penance for a sound – it might explode in our hands (it might explode) [x2]

oh, I once saw many place the end, I promised the world and a dozen roses. [x2]

Full Lyrics

Saosin’s ‘Translating the Name’ epitomizes an era of post-hardcore music that was as tumultuous and vibrant as the emotions it sought to encapsulate. With its kinetic energy and visceral vocals, the song stands as a testament to the band’s ability to marry intense musicality with deeply introspective lyrics. The title itself, ‘Translating the Name,’ implies a search for meaning, a quest to decipher something inherently cryptic—a theme echoed throughout the song.

While some may dismiss the song as just another angsty track from the early 2000s, a closer examination reveals layers of emotional complexity. The song serves as a canvas for the lyrical portrayal of heartache, the struggle to communicate, and the haunting grip of past voices. In peeling back the layers of metaphor and exploring the nuanced lament that Saosin presents, we come to find a universal narrative of internal conflict and the human condition.

The Visceral Echoes of a Haunted Past

The line ‘I have your voice on tape in a southern accent screaming at me’ is not merely an opening lyric but a window into the song’s soul—it conveys the anguish of being ensnared by memories. These memories are intrusive, striking at inopportune times, imparting a sensation that can only be described as aural specters. The southern drawl further accentuates the song’s geographical rootedness, suggesting a personal and place-specific anguish that continues to echo in the protagonist’s psyche.

This personal torment is exacerbated by the repetitive nature of this harrowing recollection, suggesting an inability to move forward. The cyclicality of the pain is mirrored in the music’s own looping cadences, creating a parallel between the lyrical themes and the auditory experience of the listener. In this manner, Saosin masterfully fuses their message with their medium.

Dissecting the Sound of Severed Ties

In the heart of the song we find the lyric ‘I’ve been watching rose give in to it severing the ties between mother and son.’ The symbolic use of a rose, a representation of both beauty and pain (through its thorns), alludes to a loss of innocence or a coming of age. The surrender to this transformation results in the severing of primary relationships, a motif that rings true for many as they navigate the treacherous waters of growth and self-discovery.

The ‘sound’ that is deliberated upon and savored could point to the emotional release or the acceptance of this transformation, despite its potentially explosive nature—a double-edged sword that can lead to growth or destruction. By purposefully playing on this duality, Saosin creates a powerful narrative on the nature of change, especially as it pertains to personal evolution and the often painful process it entails.

Unraveling the Cryptic Walk of Shame

As the protagonist notes the subject ‘walking so peculiar,’ we’re led down a path of suspicion and self-awareness where ‘something to hide’ could well represent the undisclosed wounds and dark secrets we carry. This line resonates with anyone who has felt the weight of hidden struggles that alter one’s composure, hinting at the universal experience of carrying internal burdens that are not apparent to the outside world.

The repetition of these lines emphasizes the critical nature of this observation, perhaps suggesting a pattern of behavior or a perennial internal conflict. Within the broader context of the song, this peculiar walk symbolizes the labyrinthine journey of self-reflection and the courage required to confront one’s shadows—an exercise that is often as revealing as it is uncomfortable.

The Seismic Sentiments of Midnight Reverie

The recurring motif of ‘holding for midnight’ serves as both a literal and figurative pause, a threshold where day ends and a new night begins. This is evocative of the hope and despair that coalesce in the dead of night, where introspection turns into a relentless confrontation with one’s demons. It symbolizes a moment of solitude, a temporal space where inner dialogue and, perhaps, resolution manifest.

Within this context, ‘midnight’ is less a time than a state of being, representing both conclusion and possibility, the precipice between what has been and what could be. Saosin encapsulates this razor’s edge of emotion with surgical precision, intertwining musical intensity with the quiet dread that accompanies moments of sincere reflection.

The Explosive Finale of Promises and Penance

The lyrical climax of the song, ‘I once saw many place the end, I promised the world and a dozen roses’, encapsulates the theme of promises—both made and broken. This line reverberates with the intensity of finality but also offers a glimpse into a possible reconciliation or the setting of new terms in an ongoing battle with oneself and others.

The juxtaposition of ‘the end’ and the offering of ‘a dozen roses’ portrays a poignant picture of atonement and the desire for renewal. Saosin’s choice to close the song with this potent image leaves listeners dwelling on the cyclical nature of forgiveness and the human tendency to hope for absolution, even in the wake of our most destructive moments.

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