Want Some More – Dissecting the Thirst for Success


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Nicki Minaj & Drake's Want Some More at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. An Anthem for the Insatiable: The Psychology of ‘Want Some More’
  5. Breaking Down Barriers: Nicki Minaj’s Feminist Declaration
  6. Drake’s Verse: The Duality of Wealth and Existence
  7. Between the Lines: The Hidden Meaning of ‘Want Some More’
  8. Echoing Through Time: The Song’s Most Memorable Lines

Lyrics

Want some more

Want some more

Even though a nigga been getting to it

Want some more

(Still want some more)

Want some more

Want some more

Every time I end up getting to it

Want some more

When they start talking crazy that’s when I know that they

(Want some more)

I know that I’m getting it, but fuck it ’cause I

(Want some more)

When they start talking crazy that’s when I know that they

(Want some more)

Every time I end up getting it

(Want some more)

I’m in this bitch, I’m getting money

One minute they hate me then they love me

Ain’t got nothing for me, these dudes is funny

That’s why I’m throwing shade like it’s sunny

Who had Eminem on the first album?

Who had Kanye saying “She a problem”?

Who the fuck came in the game made her own cologne?

Who made Lil Wayne give ’em five million?

Why the fuck I gotta say it, though?

You niggas don’t know it yet?

Football touchdown on the Boeing jet

You my son, but I’m just not showing yet

Miss Icy, but it ain’t snowing yet

You can tell I’m the illest ’cause my dividend is the biggest

Bitches ain’t sitting with us, all my niggas in Margielas (Oh!)

Is pigs flying? Is these bitches trying me?

They think it’s sweet? Oh, these bitches got diabetes!

You seen that list? It was me, Baby, Jay Z and Diddy

Want some more

Want some more

Even though a nigga been getting to it

Want some more

(Still want some more)

Want some more

Want some more

Every time I end up getting to it

Want some more

When they start talking crazy that’s when I know that they

(Want some more)

I know that I’m getting it, but fuck it ’cause I

(Want some more)

When they start talking crazy that’s when I know that they

(Want some more)

Every time I end up getting it

(Want some more)

(Yo, Yo)

I’m in this bitch I’m hassadiddy

I popped a Perc and I said “thank you”

I’m popping tags everyday, it look like my B-Day

These bitches suck, so I nick name these bitches BJ

They want that union,they want that D. Wade

I tell a ho “just be happy they getting leeway”

My name Barbie, bitch (My name Barbie, bitch)

Alexander, made me Queen

I’m pulling up with the King, I’m late to my own party, bitch

Want it, I get it, I don’t be wanting for nothing

I mean, I do what I do and it must be counting for something

I don’t be jumping from topic to topic, stay in my pocket

I got your rent in my pocket, so can I pay you to pop it?

Cash money, getting six albums

No bitch niggas want to bitch out

You niggas apologize and a nigga diss you?

That’s a big problem

Want some more

Want some more

Even though a nigga been getting to it

Want some more

(Still want some more)

Want some more

Want some more

Every time I end up getting to it

Want some more

Full Lyrics

Nicki Minaj and Drake, two juggernauts of the rap game, unite in ‘Want Some More’ to deliver a powerful narrative on the insatiable hunger for success. This track, layered with boastful lyrics and a pulsating beat, reflects an introspective yet unrelenting quest for more—more respect, more money, more acknowledgement. While at face value, the song’s repetitive chorus might seem to echo the mantra of materialism that so often pervades hip-hop culture, there is a deeper resonance that speaks to the human condition and the eternal strive for greater achievement.

Through intricate wordplay, braggadocious bars, and compelling beats, ‘Want Some More’ serves as an anthem for ambition. As we peel back the layers of Minaj and Drake’s verses, we uncover a sophisticated dialogue on fame, legacy, and the industry politics that often dictate the narrative of an artist’s career. In this song, both rappers not only showcase their accomplishments but also express the vulnerability attached to their continuous pursuit.

An Anthem for the Insatiable: The Psychology of ‘Want Some More’

From the onset, the repetitious call for ‘more’ serves as both a confession and a challenge. While Minaj and Drake acknowledge their impressive feats—the money, the fame, the critical acclaim—they also expose a relentless craving that’s never fully satisfied. This doesn’t just mirror the rappers’ personal journeys; it reflects our societal obsession with progress, where yesterday’s victories are quickly forgotten as we race towards tomorrow’s goals. It’s a mindset rooted deep within human nature—the psychological phenomenon of hedonic adaptation—and ‘Want Some More’ is its soundtrack.

Minaj and Drake’s partnership on the track underscores a mutual understanding of this phenomenon. As they spit their verses, they don’t just seek more for themselves; they’re speaking for everyone who feels the same pull—artists, athletes, entrepreneurs—anyone who is on a relentless quest for personal betterment. Through their words, they validate and vocalize the collective chase for more that so defines our era.

Breaking Down Barriers: Nicki Minaj’s Feminist Declaration

In a genre historically dominated by men, Nicki Minaj’s verse in ‘Want Some More’ is a hard-hitting testament to her prowess. When she references being acknowledged by Eminem and Kanye West, or making Lil Wayne hand over five million, Minaj isn’t just name-dropping—she’s asserting her status in a male-centric industry. The subtext here is clear: she’s not just playing the game; she’s rewriting the rules.

Minaj’s candid talk of her own accomplishments and direct challenges to her detractors—’Who the fuck came in the game made her own cologne?’—echoes a broader sentiment in discussions of industry glass ceilings. Her verse serves not just as self-promotion, but as an audacious stand for women in hip-hop and beyond to demand their ‘more,’ whether it be respect, opportunity, or financial remuneration.

Drake’s Verse: The Duality of Wealth and Existence

Meanwhile, Drake’s supporting verse contributes an interesting counterpoint to Minaj’s assertions. Drake is no stranger to wealth and accolades, yet his contribution to ‘Want Some More’ is less a direct assertion of power and more an introspective reflection on the nature of his desires. By questioning the motivations behind the thirst for ‘more’ (‘Why the fuck I gotta say it, though?’), he digresses into the philosophical underpinnings of success and satisfaction.

This deeper dive into the psyche behind their success is essential to understanding the song’s complexity. Yes, they ‘want some more,’ but Drake’s rhetorical questions hint at an awareness of the paradox of plenty: the notion that material success may not necessarily equate to happiness or fulfillment, and yet they—and we—continue to pursue it relentlessly.

Between the Lines: The Hidden Meaning of ‘Want Some More’

Beyond the overt messages of success and ambition, ‘Want Some More’ may have a veiled layer commenting on the ephemeral nature of fame and the pressures to maintain relevance. Nicki and Drake are acutely aware of the fickleness of the limelight, and their lyrics could very well be exploring the anxiety and determination that follow. ‘Want some more’ turns from a battle cry of voracity into a whisper of insecurity lurking beneath the bombastic surface.

Sifting through the bravado, one uncovers a complex commentary on the longevity of an artist’s career. To ‘want some more’ is not only to chase a never-ending upward spiral but to fend off the inevitable decline that comes with time and changing public tastes. Through this lens, the song becomes a battle against obsolescence, a fight to remain in the ‘more’ even as the spotlight threatens to shift.

Echoing Through Time: The Song’s Most Memorable Lines

‘Want Some More’ resonates with lines that are both catchy and revealing—’You seen that list? It was me, Baby, Jay Z and Diddy’—Minaj manages to place herself amidst hip-hop royalty. It’s a bold, brash statement, but also one that sticks in the mind for its sheer audacity. Similarly, Drake’s queries—’You my son, but I’m just not showing yet’—marry wit with an undercurrent of dominance, encapsulating the theme of generational competition within the industry.

These lines are memorable not only for their clever composition but also because they encapsulate the central premise of the song. They are timestamped testimonials of Minaj and Drake’s status and the intensity with which they’ll defend that status. Even as the rest of the song fades into the collective unconscious, these lines will reverberate, reminding listeners of the markers of ‘more’ that both rappers so fervently champion.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *