A Sentence Of Sorts In Kongsvinger – Unraveling the Enigmatic Journey Through Melodic Metaphors


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for of Montreal's A Sentence Of Sorts In Kongsvinger at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Unveiling the Nordic Noir: A Dive into the Winter of Discontent
  5. Static Craziness and Solar Fevers: Deciphering the Dissonance
  6. A Literary Retreat and the Reconstructing of Self
  7. Confronting the Dirty Old Shadow: The Inner Antagonist Exposed
  8. Beyond the Kaleidoscope: Interpreting the Cryptic Echoes of Transformation

Lyrics

I spent the winter on the verge of a total breakdown
While living in Norway
I felt the darkness of the black metal bands
But being such fawn of a man
I didn’t burn down any old churches
Just slept way too much, just slept

My mind rejects the frequency
It’s static craziness to me
Is it a solar fever?

The TV man is too loud
Our plane is sleeping on a cloud
You turn the dial, I’ll try and smile
We’ve eaten plastic weather
This family sticks together
We will escape from the south to the west side

My mind rejects the frequency
It’s just verbosity to me

I spent the winter with my nose buried in a book
While trying to restructure my character
Because it had become vile to its creator
And through many dreadful nights
I lay praying to a saint that nobody has heard of
And waiting for some high times to come again

My mind rejects the frequency
It’s static craziness to me
Is it a solar fever?

The TV man is too loud
Our plane is sleeping on a cloud
You turn the dial, I’ll try and smile
We’ve eaten plastic weather
This family sticks together
We will escape from the south to the west side

My mind rejects the frequency
It’s just verbosity to me

Dirty old shadow, stay away
Don’t play your games with me
I am older now, I see the way you operate
If you don’t hurt me then you die

My mind rejects the frequency
It’s static craziness to me
Is it a solar fever?

The TV man is too loud
Our plane is sleeping on a cloud
You turn the dial, I’ll try and smile
We’ve eaten plastic weather
This family sticks together
We will escape from the south to the west side

My mind rejects the frequency
It’s just verbosity to me

Full Lyrics

Embedded within the psychedelic soundscape and quirky melodies of of Montreal’s track ‘A Sentence Of Sorts In Kongsvinger’ lies a patchwork of vivid imagery and emotional depth that demands a closer look. The song, part of their 2007 album ‘Hissing Fauna, Are You the Destroyer?’, unfolds as a cathartic narrative that mirrors the inner turmoil and eventual metamorphosis of the band’s frontman, Kevin Barnes.

With references to a real-life retreat in Norway and metaphors steeped in darkness and light, the track serves as a bridge between Barnes’ personal struggles and the audience’s search for meaning. The richness of the language and the eccentricity of the delivery create an almost literary experience, inviting listeners to decode the complex threads of existential musings through the lens of a sonic odyssey.

Unveiling the Nordic Noir: A Dive into the Winter of Discontent

The opening verse sets the scene in a stark Norwegian winter, serving as a backdrop to the singer’s emotional unrest. The reference to ‘the verge of a total breakdown’ suggests a profound struggle within Barnes’ psyche, one that is accentuated by the ‘darkness of the black metal bands’. This contrast between the expected and the real response to depression is telling – instead of engaging with the destructive tendencies associated with the genre, Barnes communicates a more inward, depressive state, underscored by excessive sleep and introspection.

The starkness of the environment mirrors the barren state of his mind, a canvas painted with shades of self-reflective solitude. Norway becomes more than just a place—it’s a metaphor for the isolation and the chilling grip of one’s own shadowy thoughts. This setting lays the groundwork for the journey that unfolds, illustrating the desolate mental landscape that the song seeks to navigate and ultimately transcend.

Static Craziness and Solar Fevers: Deciphering the Dissonance

The recurring mention of ‘My mind rejects the frequency’ is a provocative herald to the disconnection Barnes feels from his surroundings. The ‘static craziness’ suggests a cognitive dissonance, an inability to tune into the world’s noise, or more specifically, the demands and expectations that come from an external source. It signals a dislocated sense of self, wrestling with the persistent static of an overstimulated society.

Is it a ‘solar fever’? The phrase conjures images of an overpowering, external force causing internal unrest—perhaps alluding to how societal pressures can boil over into personal anxiety. It portrays the struggle of remaining true to oneself while being bombarded with the ‘loud’ and ‘plastic’ artifice of the modern age—symbolized by the ‘TV man’. This ‘frequency’ is ignorable only through a conscious disconnect, a theme that reverberates throughout the track.

A Literary Retreat and the Reconstructing of Self

There’s a palpable shift from external to internal as Barnes describes the winter ‘with my nose buried in a book’ as an attempt to ‘restructure my character’. This introspection unearths the introspective quest to self-improve. Literature becomes a sanctuary; a means of finding escape and perhaps even guidance out of the existential maze he finds himself in.

The confession of his character becoming ‘vile to its creator’ reveals a raw self-realization and the desire for change—echoing the timeless narrative of redemption and the rebirth of one’s identity. Praying to an obscure saint, the songwriter reaches for divine intervention or, possibly, for any fragment of hope to cling to as he seeks a path to the ‘high times’ of joy and clarity.

Confronting the Dirty Old Shadow: The Inner Antagonist Exposed

As the lyrics reach their crest, the ‘dirty old shadow’ surfaces—a personification of past demons or perhaps the darker aspects of one’s self. By commanding it to ‘stay away,’ Barnes articulates an understanding of the manipulative games of depression and self-doubt. He is ‘older now,’ hinting at personal growth and a newfound strength to confront, and potentially overcome, the menacing internal adversary.

The stark ultimatum ‘If you don’t hurt me then you die’ is a defiant and resolute stand against the shadow’s influence, marking a critical point in the journey toward healing. It is an assertion of power over the once uncontrollable elements of the psyche, embodying the fight to break free from the cycles of mental anguish.

Beyond the Kaleidoscope: Interpreting the Cryptic Echoes of Transformation

In the song’s cathartic crescendo, ‘We will escape from the south to the west side’ becomes a manifesto of migration, both geographical and psychological. Here, the concept of escape transforms into a palpable action, breaking free from past haunts and embarking towards new horizons where family—a likely symbol for kinship and unity—is the cornerstone for survival.

Amidst the swirling vortex of complex lyricism and peculiar metaphors, ‘A Sentence Of Sorts In Kongsvinger’ crystallizes into a resonant narrative. Barnes takes us through a maze of mental health struggles, self-examination, and the tenacious quest for a rebirth of spirit—a journey both deeply personal and universally relatable.

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