Break – The Anthem of Intentional Stillness in a Hurried World


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Kero Kero Bonito's Break at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Unpacking the Cadence of Calm in a Chaotic World
  5. A Daydream Voyage through Bicultural Lyrics
  6. The Song’s Hidden Meaning: Rebellion Against the Cult of Busy
  7. Memorable Lines with a Laidback Punch
  8. Navigating Modern-Day Zen Through Pop Culture

Lyrics

I know it seems kinda tough
But really it’s easy enough
For us to slow down the pace
So we can all go take a break
It’s like there’s not much better than nothing at all
And that’s especially true when there’s something to do

Me ni mai yo
Kurakura sekai ah kaki nuki
Dzudema watashi wa daydream
Yumi meteru
Look out the window madonoso to
Watching the world go by, goodbye!

Minai doko ka imu ka teru
Domo kami ga
Dancing in the wind
Ko yu doki ni omō n ga
Ikite to hontoni yo kata
Syer washi chi bu ni nari unda
Koro de ike ga suru nda
I’ve got a smile on my face
‘Cause now I’m taking a break

Nani mo shi ny
Kono chi kan
Ma t yu kono chi kan
Desu ni kurai ikita kete
Let’s slow down

I know it’s seems kinda tough
But really it’s easy enough
For us to slow down the pace
So we can all go take a break
It’s like there’s not much better than nothing at all
And that’s especially true when there is something to do

Just move very slowly to the beat
(Ayo, ay ay yo oh)
Now get down and put up your feet
(Ayo, ay ay yo oh)
If you like to lounge, relax or flop
(Ayo, ay ay yo oh)
Doesn’t really matter when you’re doing squat
(Ayo, ay ay yo oh)

Sora awu miage iu n ma n-getsu
Hoshite go n’na ne keirena nda
Ko yu doki ni omō nda
Iki deru te fushi chi
Life is a race, that’s what they say
So time out and look around
Tachidomaru to ni ie tsukuru
I see it now
Take a break!

Hey, you’ve reached Gus and Jamie from KKB
We’re recording right now so leave your message after the beep

Yo, Gus and Jamie, it’s Sarah
Just to let you know that I don’t wanna do anything today
So I’ll see ya later, bye!

I know it seems kinda tough
But really it’s easy enough
For us to slow down the pace
So we can all go take a break
It’s like there’s not much better than nothing at all
And that’s especially true when there is something to do

Just move very slowly to the beat
(Ayo, ay ay yo oh)
Now get down and put up your feet
(Ayo, ay ay yo oh)
If you like to lounge, relax or flop
(Ayo, ay ay yo oh)
Doesn’t really matter when you’re doing squat
(Ayo, ayo)

Full Lyrics

In a society that prizes constant hustle and bustle, ‘Break’ by Kero Kero Bonito emerges not just as a jaunty tune to bop your head to, but as a modern-day manifesto championing the need for pause and repose. At first listen, the track might come off as a jovial call to slackerdom, but a deep dive into its lyrical content reveals layers of nuanced perspectives on the art of doing nothing in a culture obsessed with doing everything.

The English-Japanese trio known for their eclectic mix of electropop, dance beats, and quirky bilingual wordplay, Kero Kero Bonito (KKB), skillfully uses their signature sound to dissect themes of rest and reflection, encouraging listeners to embrace the overlooked elegance of idleness. We’ll navigate the rhythmic waves and dissect the profound message hidden beneath the catchy chorus.

Unpacking the Cadence of Calm in a Chaotic World

Upon casual observation, ‘Break’ invites us into a soothing rhythm embedded in a soundscape suggesting tranquility. The melody carves out a sonic space where one can step back from the chaos of daily life. KKB isn’t just asking us to relax; they’re advocating for a mental and physical deceleration to experience life beyond our schedules and screens.

The track’s tempo itself seems to embody the message it relays – slow, deliberate, and carefree. It’s as if the song not only describes a break but becomes a musical embodiment of one, offering listeners a metronome for their moment of needed respite.

A Daydream Voyage through Bicultural Lyrics

Kero Kero Bonito’s seamless interweaving of English and Japanese isn’t simply a stylistic choice; it signifies the melding of cultures and the universal yearning for a break. As Sarah wistfully raps in both languages, she creates a tapestry that connects the individual experience of relaxation to a broader, cross-cultural audience.

The Japanese lines not only add a layer of global appeal but also embed the song with a sense of whimsy and a reminder of the beauty found in daydreaming – a luxury often left behind in adulthood. The bilingual verses are a reminder of our shared humanity in the need to occasionally escape routine and indulge in the stillness of being.

The Song’s Hidden Meaning: Rebellion Against the Cult of Busy

In a counterintuitive twist, ‘Break’ presents doing ‘nothing at all’ as a radical act. We live in a world where worth is often measured by productivity, yet KKB flips the script, declaring downtime as something not just beneficial, but vital. Instead of quantifiable output, the song measures life in moments of pleasure and rest.

By heralding inactivity, the track poses as a subtle form of protest against societal norms that equate success with perpetual motion. KKB drives home the point that taking a break is not a sign of weakness but a strategic move for long-term contentment and a balanced life.

Memorable Lines with a Laidback Punch

‘It’s like there’s not much better than nothing at all / And that’s especially true when there is something to do.’ These lines capture the essence of the song’s message – the paradoxical beauty of choosing inaction when action is possible. It’s not about shirking responsibility but relishing the power of choice and realizing that sometimes, doing less is more.

Another gripping line, ‘Life is a race, that’s what they say / So time out and look around,’ encourages disconnection from the rat race to appreciate the simplicity of the surrounding world. It’s a gentle nudge to value ‘now’ over the ‘next’, and to find joy in mere existence.

Navigating Modern-Day Zen Through Pop Culture

‘Break’ becomes more than a song; it serves as a contemporary guide for mindfulness amidst our digital age. KKB has managed to craft a tune that doubles as an audible reminder to breathe and recalibrate. In an indirect way, ‘Break’ is their musical iteration of ‘smelling the roses’, or perhaps more aptly, hitting the pause button.

The song taps into a universal truth that KKB has eloquently translated into music: the potential for contentment lies in the midst of tranquility rather than in the pursuit of incessant activity. By broadcasting this message through the infectious medium of pop, KKB ensures it resonates on dancefloors and in the quiet moments of self-reflection alike.

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