DON’T SHOOT UP THE PARTY by BROCKHAMPTON Lyrics Meaning – Unveiling the Profound Commentary on Social Issues


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for BROCKHAMPTON's DON'T SHOOT UP THE PARTY at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

All-American self-hatred runs deep
White boys all I see whenever I sleep
Niggas think I think these thoughts on purpose
But I knew ’bout NSYNC ‘fore cash could rule me
Colonized minds by masters and slaves
They both hate niggas that like niggas the same
Homophobic, I tried to gang bang
I tried to get laid, I had to get paid
Hopped off the ship, I land on my feet
In Corpus Christi I got my own street
Runnin’ this shit like it’s a track meet
I had to go back home, I seen too many niggas die in a week
I give my dogs black wealth, let ’em live well
What a miracle we dreamed a million stories to tell
You are now tuned in, baby, to the new classic
New machine, keep the peace, keep ’em dancin’

Don’t shoot up the party
Don’t shoot up the party
Please, please
Don’t shoot up the party
Don’t shoot up the party
Please, please
Don’t shoot up the party
Don’t shoot up my party
Please, please (please, please)
Please, please (please, please, please, please)

This a jam for you whims and you woes
For the people in the back standin’ on they tippy toes
Don’t give a damn what the journalist wrote
Always dead inside like they in the catacombs
On the prowl like a lion in his throne
Watchin’ for the prey that might slit his throat
It’s ’bout time that I let your ass know
Y’all deserve the guillotine even more (uh-oh)
Kiss my ass, treat my balls like it’s mistletoe
Fuck class, get cash by the truckload
Latest album with my dogs but the city closed
You in for a hell of a ride, uh-oh
This a good time, know I’m damn right
Order every single bottle of the best wine
Fuck if I know, need it all though
Dedicate this to my family in Chicago

Stay down, I’m sorry
Stay down, you’re ugly
Uh-oh, oh
The people need more of the money
These white people don’t love me
Uh-oh, oh
Stay down, I’m sorry
Stay down, we’re hungry
Uh-oh, oh
I don’t need you to love me
Fuck you, come fuck me
I know

Don’t shoot up the party
Don’t shoot up the party
Please, please
Don’t shoot up the party
Don’t shoot up the party
Please, please
Don’t shoot up the party
Don’t shoot up my party
Please, please (please, please)
Please, please (please, please, please, please)

What’s the issue?
Why you gotta grab that pistol?
Think about who gon’ miss you
Never know what I been through
What’s the issue?
Why you gotta grab that pistol?
Think about who gon’ miss you
Never know what they might do

Don’t shoot up the party
Don’t shoot up the

(Yeah)
(Who you really wanna try to step to?)
(Try to step to?)
(Who you really wanna try to step to?)
(Oh)
(Oh, yeah)

Full Lyrics

In an era where music often serves as the backdrop for social movements and the voice for the voiceless, BROCKHAMPTON’s ‘DON’T SHOOT UP THE PARTY’ strikes a chord that resonates deep within the fault lines of American society. The track, a vibrant mix of heavy beats and poignant lyrics, provides more than just a snapshot into the collective’s psyche; it serves as a mirror to the complexities of contemporary life marred by racial tensions and societal pressures.

The song, which blends the playful with the somber, functions as an allegory for the various forms of violence that permeate our world—from literal interpretations of the title to more metaphorical takes on personal and systemic aggressions. Below, we delve into the layers of ‘DON’T SHOOT UP THE PARTY,’ unpacking the artistry of BROCKHAMPTON’s narrative and the multifaceted commentary coded within the lyrics.

A Battle Cry Against Racial and Homophobic Violence

At first glance, the song’s refrain, ‘DON’T SHOOT UP THE PARTY,’ appears to be a direct plea against the all-too-common news reports of shootings at public gatherings. However, the chorus also speaks volumes on a metaphorical level. It calls for a ceasefire within spaces—both physical and psychological—that are supposed to be sanctuaries from the troubles of the world. The lyrics delve into the pain inflicted by systemic racism and the internalized homophobia that haunts the American psyche.

The line ‘All-American self-hatred runs deep’ sets the tone for an exploration of the cultural and historical chains that bind individuals to roles and perceptions that are inescapable. As the song progresses, the group touches on personal experiences and observations, translating social commentaries into raw, emotional lyrics that speak to the struggles of identity and belonging.

Dissecting the Labyrinth of Masculinity and Societal Expectations

‘Homophobic, I tried to gang bang / I tried to get laid, I had to get paid’—these lines cut to the heart of the societal demands placed on men, and particularly men of color, to conform to a hypermasculine image. BROCKHAMPTON confronts the often toxic standards of manhood, admitting attempts to fit a mold that paradoxically abhors the very nature of some of its members, bringing to light the violence that individuals inflict upon themselves in the pursuit of acceptance.

The struggle for authenticity versus survival is not lost in the song’s narrative. The fight for economic stability (‘I had to get paid’) is juxtaposed against the search for emotional and physical intimacy, thereby underscoring the complexity of human desires and the lengths to which one can go to fulfill them within a judgmental society.

A Siren Song for the Marginalized and Silenced

When ‘This a jam for you whims and you woes / For the people in the back standin’ on they tippy toes’ rings out, it feels like a rallying cry for the unseen and unheard. This segment resonates particularly with those who have been relegated to the margins, amplifying the voices of the disenfranchised. The song positions itself as an anthem for the underdog, those struggling to be seen in a world designed to overlook them.

The relentless beat and urgency of the lyrics move in step with the listener’s heartbeat, creating an immersive experience that challenges the status quo. It’s a rejection of the narrative penned by a privileged few for a diverse majority. Through this, BROCKHAMPTON solidifies their position as disruptors, refusing to let the shadows claim those who deserve the spotlight.

Unveiling the Anthem’s Hidden Meaning: A Reflection on Self-Censorship

BROCKHAMPTON bravely tackles the theme of self-censorship with lines like ‘Don’t give a damn what the journalist wrote / Always dead inside like they in the catacombs.’ Here, they point to the stifling effect of external judgments and the internal toll it takes when one silences their true identity. This introspective angle reveals the ‘party’ as not just a social event but as a metaphor for the individual’s inner world—a place of celebration and vulnerability that could be destroyed by the metaphorical act of violence against oneself.

This interpretation highlights an often overlooked aspect of social violence: the emotional and psychological impacts on individuals who feel they must hide their true selves to survive. As a result, ‘DON’T SHOOT UP THE PARTY’ becomes not only a call to action against physical acts of violence but also an urgent plea to acknowledge and resist the intangible forces that suppress individuality and freedom of expression.

Memorable Lines That Cement the Song’s Legacy

‘I give my dogs black wealth, let ’em live well / What a miracle we dreamed a million stories to tell’ – these lines embody the essence of BROCKHAMPTON’s message, exuding a sense of hope and resilience. The group’s focus on elevating their community’s economic status and wellbeing emerges as a powerful declaration that they will not be defined by society’s limitations but will instead redefine success on their own terms.

Further, the song’s memorable lines stay with the listener long after the track has ended, a testament to the artistry of BROCKHAMPTON’s storytelling. Through their unique blend of lyricism and rhythm, they forge an indelible connection with their audience, inspiring a sense of purpose and unity in the face of adversity—a legacy that reverberates through the annals of music history.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like...