Enemy – Unveiling Our Role in Earth’s Downfall


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Scars on Broadway's Enemy at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Inconvenient Truth of ‘Enemy’
  5. A Spiritual Sellout and the Jesus Metaphor
  6. The Addiction Allegory – ‘We’re on drugs’
  7. Unearthing the Song’s Hidden Meaning
  8. Lines That Cut Deeper Than Skin: Memorable Lyrics

Lyrics

I know it’s really hard to see
That we are the enemy
I know it’s really hard to see
That we are the enemy of the earth

They’ll fuck you, then they’ll fuck themselves
They raise the flag that Jesus sells
They’ll fuck you, then they’ll fuck themselves
They raise the flag that Jesus sells

I know it’s really hard to see
That we are the enemy
I know it’s really hard to see
That we are the enemy of the earth

We’re on drugs, we’re on drugs
We’re all on drugs
We’re on drugs, we’re on drugs
Baby, we’re all on drugs

Do you like drugs?

Alright!

I know it’s really hard to see
That we are the enemy
I know it’s really hard to see
That we are the enemy of the earth
We are the enemy of the earth…
We are the enemy of the earth…

Full Lyrics

In the thundering chorus of Scars on Broadway’s ‘Enemy’, there’s a hard-hitting realization being unpacked: humanity’s complex relationship with its planet and the destructive impact of our collective behaviors. As the track vibrates with raw energy, it not only cements itself as a rock staple but also as a haunting reminder of our culpability in environmental degradation.

The song, a bristling mix of aggressive guitar riffs and anthemic lyrics, confronts the often-ignored truth of our times—the ominous notion that we, as a species, have become the adversaries of our own home. With a confrontational tone and enthralling sound, ‘Enemy’ lays bare the scars we have engraved upon the earth we profess to love.

The Inconvenient Truth of ‘Enemy’

Daron Malakian, the driving force behind Scars on Broadway, is no stranger to integrating activism into his artistry. ‘Enemy’ serves as a stark commentary on environmental negligence and our own denial. It echoes the sentiment that acknowledging the problem is the first step towards resolution, yet we’re struggling to face the music. The song does not flinch from highlighting that we’ve become the antagonists in the narrative of earth’s well-being.

The repetitive lines ‘I know it’s really hard to see / That we are the enemy / Of the earth’ acts as a mantra that not only emphasizes the message but also serves as an introspective tool, compelling listeners to consider the ways in which they contribute to the larger issue at hand.

A Spiritual Sellout and the Jesus Metaphor

The lyrics ‘They raise the flag that Jesus sells’ is a double-edged sword—simultaneously pointing out the commercialization of religion and the moral corruption that sometimes accompanies it. It portrays a society that commodifies spirituality for personal gain, while ignoring the dire consequences of its actions. The song pulls no punches in expressing disdain for those who hide their selfish agendas behind a facade of religious fervor.

In a broader sense, the line suggests a disturbing convenience in selectively choosing principles when profitable and beneficial, but abandoning them when it comes to safeguarding the planet. It’s a powerful indictment of hypocrisy that reverberates throughout the song’s fiery delivery.

The Addiction Allegory – ‘We’re on drugs’

The blunt confession ‘We’re on drugs, we’re on drugs / Baby, we’re all on drugs’ is more than it seems. It transcends literal substance abuse and dives into the metaphorical realm of addiction to consumption, power, and the intoxication of industrial progress. Malakian is not mincing words here; he’s equating our obsessive and continuous exploitation of earth’s resources to a drug dependency that is hard to kick.

The song’s bridge, with its straightforward question ‘Do you like drugs?’, jolts the audience awake. It’s a question served two-fold: challenging listeners to confront their own complicity in this addiction, and to question the unsustainable lifestyles we’ve come to normalize.

Unearthing the Song’s Hidden Meaning

‘Enemy’ is rich with layers that offer a reflection of humanity’s inner turmoil as we navigate the consequences of our dominion over nature. The hidden meaning surfaces when we look beyond the initial shock value and percussive might. This punk-rock manifesto encapsulates the internal conflict between our insatiable craving for material comfort and our innate, yet often suppressed, understanding of its cost.

Each verse acts as a mirror to our collective consciousness, reflecting the inner ‘enemy’ that battles our better judgement. With each rhythm and rhyme, the track doesn’t just entertain, it educates and implores a call to action, asking listeners to re-evaluate their choices and beliefs.

Lines That Cut Deeper Than Skin: Memorable Lyrics

Though the entirety of ‘Enemy’ is laden with memorable lines, the visceral repetition of ‘I know it’s really hard to see / That we are the enemy of the earth’ stays with listeners long after the song ends. It’s a line that captures the essence of the song’s urgent message, a lyrical hook that’s simultaneously an accusation and a confession.

In sum, ‘Enemy’ does more than scratch the surface of societal ills—through its aggressive sonics and harsh yet needed truths, it leaves a scar. It’s a poignant reminder of our responsibilities as stewards of the earth and the adverse effects our actions have on the planet we call home. With Malakian’s poignant lyricism, ‘Enemy’ stands as a rock hallmark and a clarion call to re-examine the course of humanity.

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