They Say – The Anthem of Rebellious Clarity in a Muddled Age


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Scars on Broadway's They Say at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Climbing Walls and Watching Tragedies: A Dissection
  5. The Hidden Rebellion Against Societal Constructs
  6. A Portrait of Power and Moral Decay
  7. Memorable Lines That Capture Collective Grief
  8. The Painful Embrace of Nostalgia and Resignation

Lyrics

I walked the line, the line I choose
I see the people in front of me
I climbed the wall, the wall of news
I watched them show the tragedy

If you were me, could you defend
the given rights to all the men?
Let’s fuck the world with all it’s trend
They say it’s all about to end…

They say it’s all about to end…
They say, they say…

There’s a prison that’s gone, but the fear lives on
I watched you walking on the dotted line
Maybe you don’t see what’s in front of me
Maybe you won’t stand the test of time
For we live in sin, for we will win
I watched the president kiss his family
For we live in sin, for we will win
I watched the president fuck society

If you were me, could you defend
the given rights to all the men?
Let’s fuck the world with all it’s trend
They say it’s all about to end…

They say it’s all about to end…
They say, they say…

I fall in love with the old times
I never mention my own mind
Let’s fuck the world with all it’s trend
Thank god, it’s all about to end…

They say it’s all about to end…
They say, they say…
They say, they say…
They say it’s all about to end

Full Lyrics

Scars on Broadway’s ‘They Say’ hits you like a freight train of raw emotion and pointed critique. The song’s brooding guitar riffs and aggressive lyrical delivery craft a narrative that’s not just a simple outcry against societal flaws but an unabashed mirror held up to the tumultuous times we find ourselves in. ‘They Say’ is more than a track; it’s a statement, a declaration of awareness, and a challenge to the status quo.

To truly understand ‘They Say,’ one must peel back the layers of complex symbolism and direct discourse woven into its fabric. The song unravels as a passionate protest, marked by a sense of existential urgency that prompts listeners to contemplate where they stand amidst the chaos of the modern world. It’s steeped in the band’s signature blend of poignancy and provocation, making it a song that refuses to fade into the white noise of contemporary music.

Climbing Walls and Watching Tragedies: A Dissection

The visceral opening lines of ‘They Say’ paint a vivid picture of an observer, one who has chosen their path and now watches as society parades its calamities unabashedly. This notion of climbing ‘the wall of news’ could be representative of the effort to stay informed, to absorb the world’s happenings despite the toll it takes.

Watching ‘them show the tragedy’ suggests a critique of the media’s role in sensationalizing pain and misfortune, an entity that capitalizes on the macabre dance of human suffering and turns it into a spectacle for mass consumption.

The Hidden Rebellion Against Societal Constructs

Hidden within the assertive tempo of ‘They Say’ is a rebellion against norms and the very structure that binds society. When the lyrics speak of a prison that’s gone but a fear that lives on, it is perhaps an allusion to the invisible shackles of societal expectations and the lasting anxiety they instill.

This is a song that resonates with the disenchanted, those who walk their own line and observe the world from the periphery, fully aware yet detached, questioning the ‘dotted line’ that others follow without scrutiny.

A Portrait of Power and Moral Decay

In a striking departure from the refrain, ‘They Say’ cuts deep with imagery of a president—synonymous with power—engaging in the very depravity the position should shield society from. This is a powerful metaphor for the decline of moral structure and the hypocrisy at the core of our power systems.

The repeated notion of ‘living in sin, for we will win’ serves as both resignation to the rampant immorality and a dark celebration of inevitable victory despite—or perhaps because of—the prevalent corruption.

Memorable Lines That Capture Collective Grief

‘If you were me, could you defend the given rights to all the men?’ This line is not just poignant; it’s a gut-punch that asks the listener to consider their stance on humanity’s universal rights. It’s a challenge to defend the indefensible, wrapped in the gritty cloak of music.

And as the song closes with ‘They say it’s all about to end…’, it leaves a haunting echo, a sentiment that lingers like an omen whispered through the ruins of a civilization teetering on the brink.

The Painful Embrace of Nostalgia and Resignation

Exploring the past is often accompanied by a bittersweet nostalgia, and ‘They Say’ taps into that emotion through ‘I fall in love with the old times.’ This line speaks to a yearning for simpler, perhaps more authentic days, contrasting sharply with the cynicism towards present trends.

It’s this resignation that underscores the song’s raw emotional core—an exhausted love affair with a world whose vices can no longer be stomached, praying for the end, yet celebrating the freedom that comes with such finality.

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