For Her – Unraveling the Raw Emotional Tapestry


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Fiona Apple's For Her at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Chilling Narrative Disguised in Elegance
  5. The Echoing Pain of the #MeToo Movement
  6. The Significance of the ‘Cold, Hard Floor of Facts’
  7. Decoding The Hidden Meaning In The Song’s Repetition
  8. Among the Song’s Most Memorable Lines

Lyrics

Look at how feathered his cocks are
See how seamless his frocks are
Look at his paper-beating over that rockstar
Look at how long she walks and how far
Was she lost? Or
Maybe she was not for travelling in the stock car, anymore
Maybe she spent her formative years
Dealing with his contentious fears
And endless jeers and her endless tears
Or maybe she’s got tired of watching him

Sniff white off a starlet’s breast
Treating his wife like less than a guest
Getting his girl to clean up his mess
Never showing weakness unless it’s award’s season
It’s the season of the ward
And she’s trying to cut the cord
She’s tired of planting her knees on the cold, hard floor of facts
Trying to act like the other girl acts

And you strike me, I’ve been exact
But you know that you never really go to the mat
You tie everything all pretty in the second act
When you know that it didn’t go exactly like that

You arrive and drive by, like a sauced up bat
Like you know you should know but you don’t know where it’s at
Like you know you should know but you don’t know where it’s at
Like you know you should know but you don’t know where it’s at

You arrive and drive by, like a sauced up bat
Like you know you should know but you don’t know where it’s at
You arrive and drive by, like a sauced up bat
Like you know you should know but you don’t know where it’s at

Like you know, you should know, but you don’t know what you did
Like you know, you should know what happened when I came to bed
Like you know, you should know, but you don’t know
Like you know, you should know, but you don’t know
Like you know, you should know, but you don’t know what you did

Well, good morning, good morning
You raped me in the same bed your daughter was born in
Good morning, good morning
Good morning, good morning
(Like you know, you should know, but you don’t know
Like you know, you should know, but you don’t know
Like you know, you should know, but you don’t know)

You were so high
You were so high
You were so high

Full Lyrics

In a music landscape often brimming with euphemisms and veiled metaphors, Fiona Apple’s song ‘For Her’ stands starkly raw and unapologetically forthright. This hard-hitting track from her Grammy-winning album ‘Fetch the Bolt Cutters’ doesn’t just push the boundaries of lyrical storytelling but rips them apart to expose the visceral core of her experiences.

The beauty of ‘For Her’ lies in Apple’s powerful and nuanced delivery which, when coupled with a meticulous dissection of the lyrics, reveals layers of personal trauma, socio-political commentary, and an unyielding call for accountability. One can’t help but be struck by the complexity woven into its melodic tapestry, a testament to Fiona Apple’s profound artistry.

A Chilling Narrative Disguised in Elegance

‘Look at how feathered his cocks are, See how seamless his frocks are’ – Fiona Apple deftly opens ‘For Her’ with ostensible admiration that thinly veils a seedier reality. These lyrics quickly set a scene of deception, speaking to the often-glamorized façades erected by powerful men in the entertainment industry and beyond.

Her choice of words and phrasing is particularly striking: Apple juxtaposes the man’s careful craft in appearance with the exploitative actions mentioned later in the song. As listeners, we’re given this pristine image only to have it systematically dismantled as the song progresses, mirroring the disillusionment many feel when they discover the ugly truths behind such polished veneers.

The Echoing Pain of the #MeToo Movement

The song’s heart-wrenching crescendo ‘Good morning, you raped me in the same bed your daughter was born in’ speaks a truth many survivors face – the location of trauma can sometimes be a seemingly ‘safe’ place, a place of previous joy now forever tainted. Apple’s words here re-center the importance of survivor narratives, especially in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

This isn’t just Apple’s story; it’s representative of countless voices that have been silenced or dismissed. It’s an anthem for strength and a mournful reminder of the injustices prevalent within society’s power structures. The raw explicitness of the lyrics serves as a catalyst for listeners to confront these harsh realities head-on.

The Significance of the ‘Cold, Hard Floor of Facts’

When Apple sings of ‘planting her knees on the cold, hard floor of facts’, she delivers a metaphor for the struggle of acceptance and the acknowledgement of painful truths. It’s a recognition that even the starkest of facts are often willfully ignored or polished to fit a more convenient narrative.

This line embodies the stark confrontation with reality that Apple, and many others, are forced to face. Her insistence on grappling with these facts is not just a personal fight but a little bid at collective consciousness raising, insisting that awareness is the first step in combating systemic abuse.

Decoding The Hidden Meaning In The Song’s Repetition

‘Like you know, you should know, but you don’t know’ – the repeated lines serve as a haunting refrain in ‘For Her’, creating a sense of circular despair. This repetition functions to wear down any resistance to truth, reflecting the exhaustive nature of seeking justice and recognition.

Apple makes it clear that ignorance is not just a simple lack of knowledge; it’s an active choice. The people who ‘should know’ are often those in positions to make a change but choose complacency instead. This refrain becomes a pointed finger at systemic indifference and a personal demand for an overdue reckoning.

Among the Song’s Most Memorable Lines

‘You were so high’ – is repeated towards the end of the song, dipped in irony and contempt. It’s here Apple points out the dissociation of the perpetrator from the act, referencing perhaps physical intoxication or the metaphorical ‘high’ of power and control that enables such acts of violence.

This line, barely more than a whisper, becomes a testament to the imbalance of power and the destructive effects of narcotic escapism — or of any mechanism that one uses to distance oneself from the consequences of their actions. Fiona Apple manages to make these few words speak volumes on denial and responsibility.

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