Good God – Unraveling the Agony of Betrayal


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Korn's Good God at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Betrayal’s Bitter Sting
  5. The Power of Vulnerability
  6. A Sonic Portrait of Inner Turmoil
  7. Fighting Back Against Emotional Parasitism
  8. Decoding the Hidden Meaning of ‘Good God’

Lyrics

You came into my life without a single thing
I gave into your ways which left me with nothing
I’ve given into smiles, I fell for all your games
I wish so bad right now, I hadn’t let you in

Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?
Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?

The sea of life, you’re just a minnow
Live your life insecure
Feel the pain of your needles
As they shit into my brain

I scream without a sound, how could you take away
Everything that I was? Made me a fucking slave
Your face that I despise, your heart inside that’s gray
I came today to say, “You’re fucked in every way”

Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?
Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?

The sea of life, you’re just a minnow
Live your life insecure
Feel the pain of your needles
As they shit into my mind
You stole my life
Without a sign
You sucked me dry

Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?
Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?
Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?
Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?

Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?
Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?
Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?
Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?

The sea of life, you’re just a minnow
Live your life insecure
Feel the pain of your needles
As they shit into my mind
You stole my life
Without a sign
You sucked me dry

Full Lyrics

The raw and visceral aggression that Korn emanates in their song ‘Good God’ is as palpable as the slamming of drums and the growl of guitars that back the pained screams of frontman Jonathan Davis. As we delve into the simmering cauldron of emotions that cook within this song, it becomes clear that ‘Good God’ is more than just an outlet of rage; it’s a narrative of personal violation and the struggle to reclaim one’s autonomy.

Through the anguished lyrics and pummeling sound, Korn captures a sense of having been deeply wronged by an entity that’s infiltrated and spoiled their personal sanctum. It’s an anthem of retaliation against the forces that aim to domesticate, to subjugate, and to suckle the very essence of being until nothing’s left but a husk of the former self.

Betrayal’s Bitter Sting

At its heart, ‘Good God’ thrashes with the lace of betrayal. Davis’s raw-throated cries give life to the emotional turmoil one feels when trust is shattered. The lyrical journey is one of intimate violation; it’s about inviting someone into your life, granting them access to your psychic core, only to be hollowed out by their actions. This isn’t simply a story of being let down; it speaks to the destructive power of manipulation and deceit.

The repetition of the plea, ‘Won’t you get the fuck out of my face now?’ isn’t just a refrain—it’s a mantra of desperation and a declaration of war against an emotional parasite. The aggressor has been exposed, and what follows is a cathartic expulsion, a reclaiming of space thoroughly desecrated by the interloper.

The Power of Vulnerability

‘I’ve given into smiles, I fell for all your games,’ illustrates the danger in mistaking a predatory grin for a smile of sincerity. In the confessional verses of ‘Good God,’ we open the ledger of every smile accepted, every facade believed, each time vulnerability is weaponized against the self. Korn creates a soundtrack for those moments when we reckon with the costs of our own openness.

To hear Davis bellow out blame towards the deceptive is a potent reminder of the duality of human connectivity. Korn infuses this track with the awareness that while our openness can bring us the most profound connections, it can also leave us exposed to the sharpest of cuts.

A Sonic Portrait of Inner Turmoil

‘Feel the pain of your needles, as they shit into my brain,’ is delivered with a visceral disgust that transcends its surface profanity to reach the core of personal invasion. The song’s palette of heavy guitar riffs, discordant bass, and pummeling drumwork paint in no uncertain terms the tumult of the tormented mind, one that’s been picked apart until the self bleeds out into shadow.

‘Good God’ serves as a relentless wave of noise, one that represents the pandemonium that ensues within when external forces pilfer peace and bastardize inner sanctuaries. It is a song that manages to encapsulate the mental riots incited by trespassers of the soul.

Fighting Back Against Emotional Parasitism

The imagery of theft and subjugation imbue ‘Good God’ with the energy of resistance. ‘You stole my life, Without a sign, You sucked me dry,’ Davis screams. These lines do not simply convey victimization; they’re embedded with an implicit urge to retaliate, to claw back what was taken. It is Korn’s invocation to those who’ve felt their essence usurped—to rise and exorcise the presence corroding their happiness.

Korn’s message reverberates with ferocity and resilience. The repetitive calls to ‘get the fuck out’ morph from being an expression of anguish to becoming a chant of empowerment. The act of shouting back, of sounding the siren of one’s own agency, is a vital step toward healing.

Decoding the Hidden Meaning of ‘Good God’

Beyond the immediate story of confrontation and pain, ‘Good God’ harbors depth in its articulation of a universal experience—the conflict with that which seeks to diminish us. It’s an allegory for any force—be it a person, society, or internalized voice—that attempts to mold us in its feeble image.

In ‘Good God,’ Korn transcends the personal and taps into something archetypal—the battle against being overwritten by someone else’s narrative. The song impels the listener to stand guard over their spirit with ferocity, to preserve the sanctity of their personhood against the encroachments of the world. It reminds us that there is profound power in screaming ‘no’ at the face of annihilation.

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