Good to Know That If I Ever Need Attention All I Have to Do Is Die – A Dissection of Desperation and Irony


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Brand New's Good to Know That If I Ever Need Attention All I Have to Do Is Die at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Weight of Recognition: Unpacking Emotional Desperation
  5. Irony’s Lethal Ink: The Sharp Bite of Lyricism
  6. Every Whisper a Shout: The Hidden Meaning in Hushed Tones
  7. Distance as a Drug: The Euphoria of Escaping Expectations
  8. The Pernicious Lullaby: Memorable Lines that Echo Eternity

Lyrics

Am I correct to defend the fist that holds this pen?
It’s ink that lies,
the pen, the page, the paper.
I live, I learn.
You will always take what i have earned.
And so aid my end while I believe I’m winning.

Our friends speak out in our defense.
I pay ten deaf ears for two months rent.
We burn they gallows they erect,
and cut the nooses they tie for our necks.

You constantly make it impossible to make conversation.
Keep us comatose but audible.
And I like it the farther i get out.
We pass it off but it’s all on us.
Only common conversation,
it took everything i got.
And I like it the farther i get out.

Once said, always said.
I will hold the past over your head.
I’ll speak my mind whenever i feel slighted.
I am hellbent on extracting all of my revenge.
So take heart, sweetheart, or I will take it from you.

We slip concealed back to the keep.
Concede to do the work for free.
We prey as wolves among the sheep and slit the neck of soldiers while they sleep.

Full Lyrics

A swan dive into the depths of irony and desperation, Brand New’s ‘Good to Know That If I Ever Need Attention All I Have to Do Is Die’ crafts an intricate lattice of emotional turmoil and self-reflection. As the haunting chords progress, so does the unraveling of a narrative that’s both personally cathartic and eerily universal.

Vocalist Jesse Lacey’s lyrics traverse the fine line between vulnerability and vitriol, weaving together a tale that palpably resonates with anyone who’s ever grappled with their worth in the eyes of others. It’s a song that echoes the darker corners of the soul, a desperate scream for recognition at the most terrible of costs.

The Weight of Recognition: Unpacking Emotional Desperation

The title itself, a mouthful laced with sardonic wit, acts as a thesis for the confessional content that follows. It’s a harrowing commentary on the lengths one might go for a shred of recognition, a nod to the human condition’s occasional marinating in self-pity. There’s a sense of one-upmanship at play, a twisted competition where the ultimate prize is attention—albeit too late.

Lacey’s lyrics are a potpourri of personal struggle, societal criticism, and the burning desire for acknowledgment. The melody may be subtly catchy, but it’s there to serve as a stark contrast to the lyrical content—a sountrack almost too pleasant for the tale of internal sorrow and external screams for help that it accompanies.

Irony’s Lethal Ink: The Sharp Bite of Lyricism

In defense of the pen’s integrity, Lacey opens with a self-aware critique of his own songwriting. Where ink and paper should be symbols of truth, they are instead implicated in an web of lies and deceit—a metaphor for the tangled realities we weave in our darker moments.

The poignancy of ‘You will always take what I have earned’ strikes a chord with anyone familiar with the fight for recognition in the weary battleground of life. There’s a sense of self-sabotage interlinked with the pursuit of success, yet it’s presented with the clarity of a brutal, universal truth.

Every Whisper a Shout: The Hidden Meaning in Hushed Tones

Lacey highlights the transactional nature of support and friendship in a world where loyalty is as costly as two months’ rent for a pair of deaf ears. The track amplifies the silence surrounding personal plights, each murmur of solace falling short against the backdrop of indifference.

When the gallows are built and the nooses tied, Brand New epitomizes the sentiment of struggling against perceived constriction—a battle cry for tearing down the societal structures that seek to fit us within boxes and hang us with our own despair.

Distance as a Drug: The Euphoria of Escaping Expectations

As we ‘pass it off’ on others, the song reflects the collective apathy that pervades communication. Whether it’s the conscious distancing from each other’s troubles or the passive-aggressive relinquishing of responsibility, Lacey’s voice becomes the anthem for the disenfranchised who find solace in separation.

The line ‘And I like it the farther I get out’ serves not just as a repeated mantra, but as a declaration of independence from the crushing pressure of mutual accountability, a mantra for those who feel peace in the increasing distance from societal norms and expectations.

The Pernicious Lullaby: Memorable Lines that Echo Eternity

‘I am hellbent on extracting all of my revenge,’ signals a shift from quiet desperation to overt hostility—a vow to turn past grievances into weapons. Lacey’s song is not merely a serenade of sorrow, but a war chant against perceived slights and life’s injustices.

In this remorseless pursuit of justice, ‘So take heart, sweetheart, or I will take it from you’ resounds with unyielding determination, a line that lingers with chilling poignancy. It’s a testament to the lengths one will go to reclaim honour, even to the point of symbolically stealing another’s courage.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like...