Irresponsible Hate Anthem – Diving Deep into the Heart of Cultural Anarchy


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Marilyn Manson's Irresponsible Hate Anthem at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. An Overture of Anti-System Sentiments
  5. Provoking the Powerful: The Song’s Underlying Message
  6. The Irreverent Refrain that Captured a Generation
  7. The Dark Dance of Language: Manson’s Lyrical Labyrinth
  8. Unmasking the Hidden Lens on History

Lyrics

When you are suffering, know that I have betrayed you
And all the children sing
We hate love, we love hate
“We hate love, we love hate”
“We hate love, we love hate”

I am so all-american, sell you suicide
I am totalitarian, I’ve got abortions in my eyes

I hate the hater, I’d rape the raper
I am the animal who will not be himself

Fuck it, fuck it, fuck it, fuck it

Hey victim, should I black your eyes again?
Hey victim, you were the one who put the stick in my hand
I am the ism, my hate’s a prism
Let’s just kill everyone and let your God sort them out

Fuck it, fuck it, fuck it, fuck it

Everybody’s someone else’s nigger
I know you are, so am I
I wasn’t born with enough middle fingers
I don’t need to choose a side

I better, better, better, better not say this
Better, better, better, better not tell
Better, better, better, better not say
Better, better, better, better not tell

I hate the hater, I’d rape the raper
I am the idiot who will not be himself

Fuck it, fuck it, fuck it, fuck it

Everybody’s someone else’s nigger
I know you are, so am I
I wasn’t born with enough middle fingers
I don’t need to choose a side

America can not see anything
America can not see anything
America can not see anything
History was written by the winner

Fuck it, fuck it, fuck it
Fuck, fuck, fuck

Everybody’s someone else’s nigger
I know you are, so am I
I wasn’t born with enough middle fingers
I don’t need to choose a side

Full Lyrics

Not for the faint of heart, Marilyn Manson’s ‘Irresponsible Hate Anthem’ hurls listeners into a chaotic realm of rebellion and societal critique. With lyrics that slice through the veneer of American culture like a serrated blade, Manson’s anthem is an aggressive, pulsating manifesto that foregoes subtlety to confront its listeners head-on.

Drawing from a reservoir of discontent, the song’s vivid imagery and provocative statements challenge norms, setting fire to the consensual hallucination of ‘The American Dream.’ In this dissection, we explore the layers of Marilyn Manson’s creation, delving into what makes ‘Irresponsible Hate Anthem’ a relentless force in the lexicon of musical rebellion.

An Overture of Anti-System Sentiments

‘Irresponsible Hate Anthem’ tears into the fabric of American patriotism right from the outset. The self-proclamation of being ‘all-American’ juxtaposed with selling ‘suicide’ and espousing ‘totally totalitarian’ views serves not only as a contradiction but as a confrontational mission statement, questioning the very ethos that the country is built upon.

Manson doesn’t just push the envelope; he rips it to shreds, challenging the normative constructs of what constitutes hate and love. ‘We hate love, we love hate’ becomes more than just an oxymoron—it’s a mirror held up to a society that often confuses its values, reveling in the ambiguities that define contemporary American life.

Provoking the Powerful: The Song’s Underlying Message

At its core, ‘Irresponsible Hate Anthem’ serves as a provocative critique of power structures. Manson skillfully weaves a narrative that suggests society is a prison of its own design, fraught with hypocrisy and contradictions. The repeated imagery of eyes—’abortions’ in the artist’s eyes—could symbolize the idea that we are blind to our own destruction, birthed through our transgressions.

The lyrics continuously circle back to the idea of being complicit in one’s oppression (‘Hey victim, should I black your eyes again?’), a notion that haunts the song, reminding us of the cyclical nature of hate and victimization. In this way, Manson casts a wide net, implicating everyone in the propagation of hate—a universal ‘nigger’ to someone else, indicating the ubiquity of subjugation and dehumanization.

The Irreverent Refrain that Captured a Generation

Manson’s irreverent refrain, ‘I wasn’t born with enough middle fingers,’ encapsulates a visceral dissatisfaction that resonates with listeners. The declaration asserts a rejection of choosing sides in a world so deeply entrenched in binary oppositions—left vs. right, good vs. bad, us vs. them. It’s a raised banner for those feeling short-changed by the system, a raw battle cry for the unrepresented.

The statement is memorable not just for its boldness, but for how it encapsulates a prevailing sense of helplessness. It evokes an image of a lone individual defiantly standing against an overwhelming tide of sociopolitical expectations, a touchstone for rebellious spirits who feel the sting of conformity’s rigid dictates.

The Dark Dance of Language: Manson’s Lyrical Labyrinth

‘Irresponsible Hate Anthem’ is constructed with a linguistic cunning that is as incendiary as the sentiments it conveys. Manson’s choice to ‘rape the raper’ and ‘hate the hater’ twists the knife of aggression inward, suggesting that to combat hate, one must become an embodiment of it—perhaps a commentary on the infectious nature of violence and the cyclical vengeance that characterizes much of human conflict.

There is a raw, almost animalistic quality to the diction employed, where the very essence of hate is distilled into its most primal form. Yet, Manson is no brute but a wordsmith, weaving narratives that confront and captivate in equal measure.

Unmasking the Hidden Lens on History

‘History was written by the winner,’ Manson proclaims, alluding to the biased nature of historical narrative, a theme that offers one of the song’s most powerful commentaries. This line is a declaration that the story we’re told is one sided, manipulated by those who hold the power. Manson’s America ‘cannot see anything’ because what it purports to know is just one version of many truths.

Including this line in a song rife with aggressive language and themes suggests an advocacy for a deeper understanding and a call to question the narrative we’re spoon-fed. Manson’s work becomes an impetus for listeners to dig beneath the surface of official accounts, recognizing the reality that the past has been tailor-made to serve the present powers that be.

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