It Came Out Of The Sky – An Alien Tale or A Social Satire?


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Creedence Clearwater Revival's It Came Out Of The Sky at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Saucers and Senators: A Dance of Distraction
  5. Decoding the Farmer’s Plight: Jody’s Close Encounter
  6. The Almight Dollar: Commercialization of the Cosmos
  7. A Society in Disarray: Parsing the Hidden Meanings
  8. Quotable Lyrics: Memorable Lines That Echo Through Time

Lyrics

Oh, it came out of the sky, landed just a little south of Moline
Jody fell out of his tractor, couldn’t believe what he seen
Laid on the ground and shook, fearin’ for his life
Then he ran all the way to town screamin’ it came out of the sky

Well, a crowd gathered ’round and a scientist said it was marsh gas
Spiro came and made a speech about raising the Mars tax
The Vatican said, “Woe, the lord has come”
Hollywood rushed out an epic film
And Ronnie the popular said it was a communist plot

Oh, the newspapers came and made Jody a national hero

Walter and Eric said they’d put him on a network TV show
The White House said, “Put the thing in the blue room”
The Vatican said, “No, it belongs to Rome”
And Jody said, it’s mine but you can have it for seventeen million

Oh, it came out of the sky, landed just a little south of Moline
Jody fell out of his tractor, couldn’t believe what he seen
Laid on the ground a shakin’, fearin’ for his life
Then he ran all the way to town screamin’ it came out of the sky
Oh

Full Lyrics

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘It Came Out of the Sky’ is more than just a tune with a catchy riff; it’s a rich tapestry woven with the threads of social satire, pop culture commentary, and the band’s trademark swamp rock sound. The song narrates an event as ordinary as a farmer witnessing something extraordinary from the heavens and escalates into a national frenzy.

As if under a musical magnifying glass, the lyrics penned by John Fogerty dissect the American psyche when faced with the inexplicable. A closer look elucidates a shrewd critique of society’s power structures and how they manipulate the unknown to serve their own narratives.

Saucers and Senators: A Dance of Distraction

The incident catalyzes a societal spectacle, and the song’s verses serve as a roll call for the typical entrants in a media circus. The mention of Spiro, referring to then-Vice President Spiro Agnew, hints at the political opportunism rife during unexpected events. Agnew’s allusion to raising the ‘Mars tax’ symbolizes political grandstanding and agenda-pushing that afflicts societies during times of confusion.

The Vatican’s proclamation and Hollywood’s rush to monetize the phenomenon underscore the song’s underlying message: every sector, from religion to entertainment, seeks to claim their stake in the inexplicable, all responding with motives informed by their respective domains.

Decoding the Farmer’s Plight: Jody’s Close Encounter

Jody, the everyman at the center of this story, is a stand-in for the layperson, the voice of reason lost in the tumult. His initial fear turns into exasperation as he finds himself co-opted into a narrative spun out of his control. The newspapers’ lionization of Jody as a ‘national hero’ is an astute commentary on media sensationalism and the gullible consumption of news by the public.

The song captures the media’s lust for an appealing story, and how an individual’s experience becomes fuel for this insatiable machine. As Jody’s disbelief turns into disbelief at his predicament, the lyrics point a satirical finger at the cult of celebrity and the manufacture of heroes.

The Almight Dollar: Commercialization of the Cosmos

Perhaps the most acute observation comes when Jody, originally a passive spectator, is seduced by the same forces of greed that animate the other characters. The verse where Jody demands ‘seventeen million’ for his newfound object from the sky speaks volumes on the infectious nature of capitalism and the monetary value placed on the unclaimed and the unknown.

The intrinsic commentary is a blistering critique of commercialization, as even the extraterrestrial is not beyond the reach of monetary exploitation. At its core, the lyric serves as a reminder of how society’s lust for wealth transcends the barriers of the terrestrial.

A Society in Disarray: Parsing the Hidden Meanings

While the surface-level amusement of ‘It Came Out of the Sky’ paints an engaging tale of science fiction, the true artistry of Creedence Clearwater Revival reveals itself in the layered meanings of the verses. The song delves deep into the psyche of humanity’s leadership, exposing how they respond to the enigmatic with familiar tropes: greed, power, and control.

Each entity’s reaction to the event is a caricature of their real-world behavior, emphasizing the farce that often ensues when the populace looks to them for guidance. The satirical lens through which the song views the incident reflects societal tendencies to allow distractions, even from above, to define the discourse.

Quotable Lyrics: Memorable Lines That Echo Through Time

In the history of rock, few lines are as arresting as ‘Oh, it came out of the sky, landed just a little south of Moline.’ Right from the start, the song sets a scene that is both surreal and vivid. The imagery of Jody abandoning his tractor, gripped by fear, only to become an overnight sensation, delivers a powerful and ironic snapshot of celebrity culture.

‘And Jody said, it’s mine but you can have it for seventeen million’ echoes with an undercurrent of satire potent as any social commentary. These lyrics capture the essence of the song, crystallizing the human conditions of surprise, vanity, and avarice against the backdrop of a society that’s all too eager to indulge them.

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