Long & Lost – Unraveling the Labyrinth of Longing


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Florence + the Machine's Long & Lost at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Odyssey of the Heart: A Voyage Through ‘Long & Lost’
  5. Bridges Burned or Rebuilt: The Struggle with Forgiveness
  6. The Secret Arcana: Unveiling the Hidden Meanings
  7. Echoes of Resolve: ‘I figured out where I belong’
  8. Memorable Lines that Seer the Soul: ‘Can the city forgive? I hear it’s sad song’

Lyrics

Lost in the fog, these hollow hills
Blood running hot, night chills
Without your love I’ll be
So long and lost, are you missing me?

Is it too late to come on home?
Are all those bridges now old stone?
Is it too late to come on home?
Can the city forgive? I hear it’s sad song

I need the clouds to cover me
Pulling them down, surround me
Without your love I’ll be
So long and lost, are you missing me?

Is it too late to come on home?
Are all those bridges now old stone?
Is it too late to come on home?
Can the city forgive? I hear it’s sad song

It’s been so long between the words we spoke
Will you be there up on the shore, I hope
You wonder why it is that I came home
I figured out where I belong

But it’s too late to come on home
Are all those bridges now old stone?
But it’s too late to come on home
Can the city forgive? I hear it’s sad song

Full Lyrics

In the midst of Florence + the Machine’s expansive discography lies ‘Long & Lost,’ a track that serves as a labyrinthian voyage through the corridors of longing, regret, and the quest for redemption. This hauntingly beautiful song envelops listeners in a mist of melancholy melodies and introspective lyrics, probing the depths of human emotion and the complexity of returning to places and people from which one has drifted.

Beyond its ethereal soundscape, ‘Long & Lost’ harbors a rich tapestry of metaphor and deep-seated yearning, emblematic of Florence Welch’s poignant songwriting. As we peel back the layers of this intricate composition, we unearth not only the song’s overt narrative but also the universal truths that resonate within its notes.

The Odyssey of the Heart: A Voyage Through ‘Long & Lost’

The opening lines of ‘Long & Lost’ plunge us into an atmosphere thick with desolation. Welch’s voice, a clarion call in the fog, evokes the image of wandering through ‘hollow hills,’ a metaphor for the emptiness one feels in the absence of loved ones. The juxtaposition of ‘blood running hot’ against ‘night chills’ mirrors the internal turmoil of longing — a feverish desire cooled only by the stark reality of separation.

Through this landscape navigates the soul of the song, a wanderer caught between the visceral need for connection and the coldness of isolation. In this odyssey of the heart, our protagonist faces not just physical distance but an existential reckoning. The pain articulated is not just for a person, but perhaps for a version of the self that exists only in conjunction with another.

Bridges Burned or Rebuilt: The Struggle with Forgiveness

One cannot dissect ‘Long & Lost’ without confronting the song’s recurring question — ‘Is it too late to come on home?’ This haunting refrain becomes a Sisyphean contemplation, asking whether time and change have rendered reconciliation impossible. The imagery of ‘bridges now old stone’ symbolizes connections that have aged and eroded, perhaps past the point of restoration.

Yet, there is a duality at play, as the song’s narrator also questions the capacity for forgiveness within the city—perhaps emblematic of society or a collective memory. This dialogue of self-forgiveness and societal acceptance underscores the universal struggle to reconcile our past actions with the desire for a compassionate present. Welch sings less of physical space and more of the emotional geography we navigate in our search for closure.

The Secret Arcana: Unveiling the Hidden Meanings

Smeared beneath the overt narrative of ‘Long & Lost’ is a collage of hidden meanings that shimmer through like light through fog. When Welch implores the clouds to ‘cover me,’ she isn’t merely seeking solace in nature’s embrace. Rather, she is invoking a shroud to obscure her from the unrelenting gaze of her own expectations and regrets. This immersion into the elements is a desperate plea for anonymity and oblivion.

The hidden meanings in the lyrics reflect a rich inner struggle. The clouds, the bridges, the city—all are characters in a play of allegory, representing stages of internal conflict and reconciliation. The listener is invited to explore these symbols, to delve into their own experiences of loss and longing, and to find solace in the understanding that the search for peace is shared and universal.

Echoes of Resolve: ‘I figured out where I belong’

A pivotal moment in the song is marked by a declaration that strikes with the force of self-realization: ‘You wonder why it is that I came home / I figured out where I belong.’ This assertive verse marks a turning point from the questioning to a statement of understanding. Welch positions herself not merely as a seeker but as someone who has uncovered a profound truth about her place in the world.

The clarity of belonging is bittersweet, woven with the recognition that this revelation comes too late for the change it may have effected. It suggests a poignant acceptance that some chapters must close so that others might begin, and that this acceptance, too, is part of the cyclical journey of coming home to oneself.

Memorable Lines that Seer the Soul: ‘Can the city forgive? I hear it’s sad song’

Certain lines in ‘Long & Lost’ linger in the mind with their haunting queries and raw emotive power. ‘Can the city forgive? I hear it’s sad song’ is one such lyric that resonates long after the music fades. This line cuts to the heart of human fragility—the fear that our mistakes cast long shadows, and the hope that there is a melody within sorrow that speaks of possible absolution.

The notion of the city’s ‘sad song’ evokes a universal lament, the collective heartache of all who strive for forgiveness. It is a refrain for the estranged and the outcast, a recognition of shared humanity in the face of individual grief. Florence Welch has a gift for crafting lyrics that act as mirrors, reflecting our deepest struggles in her liquid prose. ‘Long & Lost’ is no exception, offering a lyrical narrative that resonates on a cellular level.

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