Love and Marriage – Unpacking the Timeless Connection Between Cupid and Matrimony


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Frank Sinatra's Love and Marriage at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. An Inseparable Pair: Decoding the Iconic Simile
  5. The Societal Stamp: Marriage as an ‘Institute You Can’t Disparage’
  6. The Alluring Illusion: Dissecting Sinatra’s View on Separating Love from Matrimony
  7. A Generational Credo: Mother’s Words Echoing Through Time
  8. The Unforgettable Refrain: Memorable Lines that Shaped a Cultural Lens

Lyrics

Love and marriage, love and marriage
Go together like a horse and carriage
This I tell you brother
You can’t have one without the other

Love and marriage, love and marriage
It’s an institute you can’t disparage
Ask the local gentry
And they will say it’s elementary

Try, try, try to separate them
It’s an illusion
Try, try, try, and you will only come
To this conclusion

Love and marriage, love and marriage
Go together like a horse and carriage
Dad was told by mother
You can’t have one, you can’t have none
You can’t have one without the other

Try, try, try to separate them
It’s an illusion
Try, try, try, and you will only come
To this conclusion

Love and marriage, love and marriage
Go together like a horse and carriage
Dad was told by mother
You can’t have one (you can’t have none)
You can’t have one without the other

Full Lyrics

In the pantheon of classic crooners, Frank Sinatra stands as a colossus, his voice a vehicle for the deepest yearnings and the most joyful celebrations of the human heart. His song ‘Love and Marriage’ is a jaunty tune that harks back to a time of perceived simplicity concerning the bonds of love and the institution of marriage. At first blush, it might seem a straightforward endorsement of a traditional view, but beneath its catchy surface lie layers of cultural discourse and societal expectation.

As we parse through the lyrics that have been hummed in living rooms and twirled to at weddings for generations, we begin to unravel not just a popular song from the golden age of American music, but a commentary on the inextricable link between romantic commitment and matrimonial convention. Let’s dive into the meaning behind the swing and the sentiment, exploring what ‘Ol Blue Eyes’ was really crooning about.

An Inseparable Pair: Decoding the Iconic Simile

When Sinatra sings of love and marriage going ‘together like a horse and carriage,’ he conjures an image that feels almost archaic in its simplicity and clarity. This simile does more than rhyme nicely; it communicates a perception of necessity and function. Just as a carriage is rendered all but useless without a horse to pull it, so too, the song implies, is love incomplete without the binding contract of marriage. The horse and carriage, once an everyday symbol of progress and collaboration, become an allegorical framework portraying love and marriage as traditional and perhaps indispensable partners.

Indeed, this powerful imagery evokes a time when the horse and carriage were seen as the epitome of moving forward, essential to understand in an era where ‘progress’ in personal life is often framed very differently. But Sinatra’s lines don’t just reflect on the relationship between two entities; they play into the wider cultural dialogue about how romance and marriage are interrelated and how society perceives this bond.

The Societal Stamp: Marriage as an ‘Institute You Can’t Disparage’

Sinatra isn’t shy about propping up the sanctity of marriage, referring to it as an institution beyond reproach. ‘It’s an institute you can’t disparage,’ he croons, acknowledging the weight of societal expectation and the veneration of marriage. Here, the song becomes a mouthpiece for the conservative values of mid-20th-century America, a time when to question the institution was to find oneself at the fringes of societal norms.

By urging listeners to ‘ask the local gentry,’ the singer nods toward a kind of common wisdom or tacit consensus that marriage is foundational, a cornerstone, to personal and societal well-being. Unspoken, yet heavily lingering in the subtext, is the reinforcement of marriage as a normative path that validates and underpins the romantic love shared between two people.

The Alluring Illusion: Dissecting Sinatra’s View on Separating Love from Matrimony

The song subtly denounces attempts to untwine love from the construct of matrimony, calling such efforts ‘illusions.’ This repeated phrase reaches beyond mere catchiness, embedding in the listener’s mind the futility and even foolishness of trying to relegate love and marriage to separate spheres. Sinatra’s perspective is clear: romantic love naturally culminates in marital vows, and to think otherwise is a delusion.

It is a powerful assertion of permanence in an era now recognized for its adherence to social scripts. These lyrics may seemingly resist change and challenge, even as modern interpretations have come to question whether love should indeed be a prelude to marriage or instead stand as a complete entity in its own right.

A Generational Credo: Mother’s Words Echoing Through Time

The song reinforces generational continuity with the line, ‘Dad was told by mother.’ This passing down of societal principles from mother to son serves to cement the narrative of love and marriage as an inherited truth, a wisdom imparted from one generation to the next. The phrasing underscores the societal expectation that the lessons of the past — particularly regarding personal relationships — are to be heeded and honored.

Embedded here is a deep-seated reverence for parental guidance and the edicts of forebears. It lays bare the pressure of lineage and inheritance, particularly with regards to how relationships and family units should be structured, further amplifying the song’s cultural resonance and endurance.

The Unforgettable Refrain: Memorable Lines that Shaped a Cultural Lens

‘Love and marriage, love and marriage, Go together like a horse and carriage.’ These words echo far beyond the confines of the tune, becoming etched into the American psyche. The song’s memorable lines are not just lyrics; they’re pronouncements that have subtly shaped cultural ideologies about the ‘proper’ sequence and nature of romantic evolution.

The easy cadence and nostalgic charm of the refrain embed it deeply into our collective memory, leading listeners down a well-worn path of accepting the song’s message as an irrefutable truth. Through its lyrical poignancy and rhythmic allure, ‘Love and Marriage’ imparts a legacy that continues to dance through the conversation of what love and commitment mean in contemporary society.

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