Never Seen Such Good Things – Unraveling the Enigma of Love and Loss


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Devendra Banhart's Never Seen Such Good Things at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Dichotomous Heartbeat of Banhart’s Ballad
  5. Unveiling the Shrouded Allusions to Eden
  6. Sardonic Serenade: The Twisted Hymn of Passion
  7. The Unmasked Ceremony: A Portrait of Pained Formality
  8. Triumph in Tragedy: Acceptance in the Dirge of Despair

Lyrics

Never seen such good things go so wrong,
And everywhere we turn they’re playing our song.

(Mm hmm hmm, hmm hmm hmm).

Well, should have known someone so much like me,
Would give me Hell and send me to my knees.

Love, you’re a strange fella’,
Show Eve your mark and let ‘er be.

Love, you’re a strange fella’,
Wont you leave your mark on me?

If we ever make sweet love again,
I’m sure that it will be quite disgusting.

(Race to the end, race to the end.)

The memory of a ceremony so
Empty, bitter, boring, and hollow.

(Hollow, hollow)

But, love, you’re a strange fella
Show Eve your mark and let ‘er be.
May as well be forever,
Love, wont you come and punish me?

(Sad lady, you win)
Sad lady you win
(Sad lady, you win)
Sad lady you win
(Sad lady, you win)
Sad lady you win
(Sad lady, you win)
Sad lady you win

(Na, naa, na, na, naa)
(Na, naa, na, na, naa)
(Na, naa, na, na, naa)
(Na, naa, na, na, naa)

Full Lyrics

Devendra Banhart’s track ‘Never Seen Such Good Things’ unfurls as a paradoxical ode, weaving a juxtaposition of emotions into a rich tapestry that both celebrates and laments the vicissitudes of love. On the surface, the song appears to harbor a catchy melody masking a deeper dissonance brewing beneath its chords.

Banhart grasps at the strings of the heart with a nuanced touch, inviting listeners on a journey through the labyrinthine corridors of affection and affliction. Engaging with the song’s layers reveals a subtext thick with metaphor and poetic cadence—a harmonious blend that captures the delicate dance between ecstasy and agony.

The Dichotomous Heartbeat of Banhart’s Ballad

Banhart crafts a narrative of love’s two-faced nature in his entrancing melodies, shedding light on a tale of enchantment gone awry. ‘Never seen such good things go so wrong,’ croons the singer, evoking an image of a utopian love corrupted, a mirage that fades to reveal a starkly different reality.

The lyrics serve as a harbinger of the inherent risks in opening one’s self to another. Each note and word is a brushstroke illustrating the fragile boundary between joyous union and sorrowful estrangement. The spellbinding qualities of the song lie in its sincere portrayal of emotional polarity.

Unveiling the Shrouded Allusions to Eden

Banhart invokes biblical imagery with ‘Show Eve your mark and let ‘er be,’ a reference laden with the connotations of primal sin and the genesis of human ardor. This line is an invitation to a love that is primal, unchecked, and possibly even destructive. It’s a love that knows of its power and the inevitable mark it will leave.

There is a subtle dialogue here with the past, with the original lovers who, too, stumbled amidst paradise. It suggests a pattern, a cyclicality unique to human nature—one where love’s touch is simultaneously a cradle and a crucible.

Sardonic Serenade: The Twisted Hymn of Passion

Banhart’s dark humor percolates through with ‘If we ever make sweet love again, I’m sure that it will be quite disgusting.’ His cynicism wraps around the concept of romance gone sour, reflecting upon the disillusionment that often shadows failed relationships.

The twisted compliment to love’s past sweetness underscores the bitterness that consumes the present, illustrating the haunting remnants of intimacy once cherished. Banhart delivers a line that confronts the unpalatable aftermath that can linger long after the final embers of a love affair have been extinguished.

The Unmasked Ceremony: A Portrait of Pained Formality

Describing a ‘ceremony so empty, bitter, boring, and hollow,’ Banhart touches upon the emptiness of ritual without substance. Whether referring to a wedding or another celebration of union, his words paint a vivid image of a hollowed-out tradition that fails to capture the essence of the connection it was meant to solidify.

In these lines, the artist confronts the disheartening gap between form and meaning, between the societal expressions of love and its unvarnished, often messy truth. The starkness of the words, paired with Banhart’s haunting melody, elicits in the listener a meditative contemplation on the facade of happiness that society often insists upon.

Triumph in Tragedy: Acceptance in the Dirge of Despair

The melancholic surrender encapsulated in the ‘Sad lady, you win’ refrain marks a defeat not only in love but in the broader struggle against the melancholy that can consume life. The defeat is not merely in the context of a relationship but perhaps in the larger battle to find lasting joy amidst life’s caprices.

Yet, in the acceptance of defeat, there’s a haunting beauty. Banhart, through his evocative melancholy, transforms resignation into a soft, aching lullaby—the acceptance that pain, like love, is a fundamental human experience. The mantra-like repetition is both a concession and a cadence of strength, echoing the resilience to endure and the wisdom in recognizing the cyclical nature of human emotion.

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