Over the Love – Untangling the Lyrical Labyrinth of Emotion and Hope


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Florence the Machine's Over the Love at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Yellow Dress, A Green Light: Symbolism Weaved in Verse
  5. Unveiling the Song’s Hidden Depths and Untold Stories
  6. Tearing at the Seams: The Audacity to Feel Through Music
  7. A Love That Will ‘Get Around It’: Persistence Against the Tides
  8. A Litany for the Lost: Remembering the Most Memorable Lines

Lyrics

Ever since I was a child
I’ve turned it over in my mind
I sang by that piano, tore my yellow dress and
Cried and cried and cried

And I don’t wanna see what I’ve seen
To undo what has been done
Turn off all the lights
Let the morning come

Now there’s green light in my eyes
And my lover on my mind
And I’ll sing from the piano, tear my yellow dress and
Cry and cry and cry
Over the love of you

On this champagne, drunken hope
Against the current, all alone
Everybody, see, I love him

‘Cause it’s a feeling that you get
When the afternoon is set
On a bridge into the city

And I don’t wanna see what I’ve seen
To undo what has been done
Turn off all the lights
Let the morning come

Now there’s green light in my eyes
And my lover on my mind
And I’ll sing from the piano, tear my yellow dress and
Cry and cry and cry

‘Cause you’re a hard soul to save
With an ocean in the way
But I’ll get around it
I’ll get around it

‘Cause you’re a hard soul to save
With an ocean in the way
But I’ll get around it

Now there’s green light in my eyes
And my lover on my mind
And I’ll sing from that piano, tear my yellow dress and
Cry and cry and cry and
Over the love of you

Cry and cry and cry and
Over the love of you

Cry and cry and cry and
(I can see the green light)
(I can see it in your eyes)

(I can see the green light)
(I can see it in your eyes)
Over the love of you
Cry and cry and cry and cry

(I can see the green light)
(I can see it in your eyes)
(I can see the green light)
(I can see it in your eyes)

I can see the green light
I can see it in your eyes
I can see the green light
I can see it in your eyes

I can see the green light
I can see it in your eyes
I can see the green light
I can see it in your eyes

I can see the green light
I can see it in your eyes
I can see the green light
I can see it in your eyes

Full Lyrics

When Florence + the Machine released ‘Over the Love,’ the airwaves trembled with the powerful emotional currents emanating from this poignant track. At first listen, one might be swept away by the prominent, almost celestial voice of Florence Welch and the spellbinding harp-strumming that frequently accompanies her band’s sound. However, a deeper dive into the lyrics reveals a labyrinth of emotion, a narrative steeped in both despair and an indefatigable hope. The song is a journey, a melodious exploration of heartache and the quest for closure.

Written for Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of ‘The Great Gatsby,’ ‘Over the Love’ is not just an addition to the soundtrack; it’s an essential thread in the fabric of the story, evoking the themes of yearning, transcendence, and the futility of opulence in the face of unrequited love. Florence Welch masterfully channels the novel’s complex emotions and motifs through her poetic prowess, creating a song that functions on multiple levels and resonating with those who have felt the sting of a love that cannot be, just as deeply as Jay Gatsby pines for Daisy Buchanan.

A Yellow Dress, A Green Light: Symbolism Weaved in Verse

From the very first verse, Welch beckons us into her reflection of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s literary universe with the image of a ‘yellow dress,’ a detail that avid readers will recognize as an homage to Daisy Buchanan. This sartorial choice is more than a fashion statement; it represents the lightness of Gatsby’s unattainable dream, an emblem of his yearning that is as bright and fragile as the fabric of the dress she so poignantly sings of tearing. The mention of a ‘green light,’ too, holds a dual significance—serving both as a beacon of hope and an unbreachable distance between lovers.

Florence’s reference to the green light goes beyond echoing Gatsby’s obsession; it symbolizes a universal human experience. The green light she ‘can see’ is the glimmer of possibility, the distant horizon that each of us, at some point, strains our eyes to see. It is the potential for something more, albeit tinged with the melancholic realization that some aspirations remain forever on the periphery of our reach.

Unveiling the Song’s Hidden Depths and Untold Stories

Beneath the track’s stunning instrumentation lies a rich tapestry of lyrical depth that demands unpacking. ‘Over the Love’ is not merely a retelling of a classic tale but an embodiment of the songstress’ own emotional experiences, seamlessly woven into Fitzgerald’s narrative. As Welch weeps over the piano, one senses that it is not only Gatsby’s love story that unfurls, but also her own—a story of personal catharsis, masquerading as a paean to a long-gone era.

‘Cause it’s a feeling that you get / When the afternoon is set / On a bridge into the city’ encapsulates the anticipation of a familiar longing, a prelude to an evening of bittersweet encounters and what-ifs. Over the Love doesn’t just recapture the aura of the Jazz Age, it touches on a common thread of human emotion—the heart’s relentless pursuit despite knowing the cost of such endeavors.

Tearing at the Seams: The Audacity to Feel Through Music

What makes Florence + the Machine’s music stand out, time and time again, is their audacity to dwell in the depths of feeling. ‘Over the Love’ is a churning sea of emotional vulnerability, where the act of tearing one’s dress becomes a powerful metaphor for the rending of one’s soul in the wake of love lost. Florence limns the contours of heartbreak with her voice, a raw, unadulterated cry woven into harmony and discord alike.

The motifs of light and darkness play a significant role here. ‘Turn off all the lights / Let the morning come’ suggests a surrender to vulnerability, an acceptance of the night’s end, and a new beginning. It’s a poignant acknowledgment of the cyclical nature of healing—of mourning the past and then allowing oneself to be bathed in the nascent light of dawn and possibility.

A Love That Will ‘Get Around It’: Persistence Against the Tides

Embedded within the sorrow of Welch’s lyrics is also an unyielding determination, not unlike the tenacity of Gatsby himself. The recurring phrase, ‘But I’ll get around it,’ reflects not just a belief in persistence, but also the enduring human spirit. It speaks to the incredible resilience within us all—to weather the tempests of loss and navigate the oceans that threaten to divide us from our desires.

It is this duality of fragility and fortitude that makes ‘Over the Love’ so compelling. Florence + the Machine invites the listener to witness the endless battle between the soul’s capacity for hope against the crushing weight of reality—suggesting that even in the most trying circumstances, hope propels us beyond the shores of our immediate pain.

A Litany for the Lost: Remembering the Most Memorable Lines

‘Cry and cry and cry over the love of you.’ These simple yet evocative words dance through the finale of ‘Over the Love,’ becoming a mantra for the lovelorn and the brokenhearted. They encapsulate the universal experience of loving so deeply that the process of moving on requires an outpouring of grief—a cathartic release that is at once deeply personal and relatable to anyone who has ever loved and lost.

These memorable lines serve as both a lament and a liberating declaration; it’s a raw admission that sometimes all one can do is mourn the absence of the person they loved. Yet, in the very act of crying, Florence lights the way for listeners to cleanse their own wounds, to make space within themselves for new loves and new light, right there where the green light flickers on the horizon, ever out of reach, but endlessly alluring.

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