Read All About It, Pt. III by Emeli Sandé Lyrics Meaning – The Anthem of the Unheard and Unafraid


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Emeli Sandé's Read All About It, Pt. III at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Unleashing the Vocal Lion: How Sandé’s Lyrics Advocate for the Silenced
  5. Parsing the Hidden Meaning: A Deeper Dive into ‘Read All About It, Pt. III’
  6. Singing the Blues Away: The Cathartic Power of Shared Voices
  7. ‘Our Version of Events’: The Demand for Representation and Recognition
  8. The Pen is Mightier: Memorable Lines that Spark Action

Lyrics

You’ve got the words to change a nation
But you’re biting your tongue
You’ve spent a lifetime stuck in silence
Afraid you’ll say something wrong

If no one ever hears it
How we gonna learn your song?
So come, come on
Come on, come on

You’ve got a heart as loud as lions
So why let your voice be tamed?
Baby we’re a little different
There’s no need to be ashamed
You’ve got the light to fight the shadows
So stop hiding it away
Come on, come on

I wanna sing
I wanna shout
I wanna scream ’til the words dry out
So put it in all of the papers, I’m not afraid
They can read all about it, read all about it

No-oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh, oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh, oh-oh

At night we’re waking up the neighbours
While we sing away the blues
Making sure that we’re remembered
Yeah, ’cause we all matter too

If the truth has been forbidden
Then we’re breaking all the rules
So come on, come on
Come on, come on

Lets get the tv and the radio
To play our tune again
It’s ’bout time we got some airplay
Of our version of events
There’s no need to be afraid
I will sing with you my friend
Come on, come on

I wanna sing
I wanna shout
I wanna scream, ’til the words dry out
So put it in all of the papers, I’m not afraid
They can read all about it, read all about it

Oh-oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh, oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh, oh-oh

Yeah we’re all wonderful, wonderful people
So when did we all get so fearful?
Now we’re finally finding our voices
So take a chance, come help me sing this

Yeah we’re all wonderful, wonderful people
So when did we all get so fearful?
And now we’re finally finding our voices
Just take a chance, come help me sing this

I wanna sing
I wanna shout
I wanna scream ’til the words dry out
So put it in all of the papers, I’m not afraid
They can read all about it, read all about it

Oh-oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh, oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh-oh-oh
Oh, oh-oh

I wanna sing
I wanna shout
I wanna scream ’til the words dry out
So put it in all of the papers, I’m not afraid
They can read all about it, read all about it
Ohhhhh

Full Lyrics

In a time when the airwaves are crowded with manufactured pop hits and pre-packaged stardom, Emeli Sandé’s ‘Read All About It, Pt. III’ emerges as a soul-stirring call to arms for the silent and the sidelined. Sandé’s lyrics are a blend of personal empowerment and social commentary, a confluence that is as powerful as it is poetic.

The song transcends the usual pop tropes to offer something more substantial: an anthem for self-expression and a soundtrack to personal revolution. While easily classified under the broad canopy of pop soul, ‘Read All About It, Pt. III’ pulls at the threads of the genre to unravel layers of deeper meaning, resonating with listeners around the world who have found their voice in its melody.

Unleashing the Vocal Lion: How Sandé’s Lyrics Advocate for the Silenced

Within the opening stanza, Sandé confronts the listener with a potent question: ‘You’ve got the words to change a nation, but you’re biting your tongue.’ It’s a call to those who have repressed their thoughts, opinions, and dreams out of fear or anxiety. The message is clear: the time to speak is now.

The song’s plea for vocal liberation is not just about audible words; it’s about the fear of societal reprisal and the personal trepidation that keeps individuals from speaking their truth. By empowering the listener to recognize their own potential for impact, Sandé seeks to dismantle the mental barriers to self-expression.

Parsing the Hidden Meaning: A Deeper Dive into ‘Read All About It, Pt. III’

While on the surface ‘Read All About It, Pt. III’ is an impassioned encouragement for vocal freedom, there’s a subtext that speaks to a universal human experience. Sandé’s reference to ‘fighting the shadows’ and ‘breaking all the rules’ echoes the sentiments of those who’ve been marginalized or oppressed.

The subversion of the forbidden truth as mentioned in the verses symbolizes a breaking away from societal norms and constraints. Sandé isn’t just asking her listeners to speak; she’s urging them to challenge the status quo and transform the fabric of common narrative.

Singing the Blues Away: The Cathartic Power of Shared Voices

Sandé not only sings about raising one’s voice, but she also touches on the collective experience of doing so. ‘At night we’re waking up the neighbours, while we sing away the blues’ implies a community coming together, finding solace and strength in each other’s company.

This collective action moves the song from individual struggle to group triumph. Through the act of singing—literal or metaphorical—a camaraderie is formed among the once-silenced, demonstrating the song’s ability to bond and inspire.

‘Our Version of Events’: The Demand for Representation and Recognition

‘Let’s get the TV and the radio to play our tune again’ is Sandé’s charge for representation in the media. The artist knows all too well that the soundscape of popular culture has too often been homogenized, leaving out the diverse voices that make up humanity’s chorus.

There’s a cry for inclusivity in these lines, an acknowledgment of the need for varied narratives in the media we consume. This is a definitive call for the elevation of the marginal voices to the prime time slot they deserve.

The Pen is Mightier: Memorable Lines that Spark Action

‘I wanna sing, I wanna shout, I wanna scream ’til the words dry out, so put it in all of the papers, I’m not afraid.’ This refrain forms the backbone of the entire song, and its repetition serves as a crescendo of self-assertion. It’s both a declaration of independence and a slogan for anyone who has ever felt voiceless.

The unwavering boldness of this phrase thrums with the vibrancy of a protest chant, a rallying cry for shaking off the shackles of fear. By introducing the imagery of headlines and media, Sandé cleverly suggests that everyone’s story — regardless of its simplicity or grandeur — deserves the spotlight; everyone has the right to be heard.

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