The Nobodies by Marilyn Manson Lyrics Meaning – Unearthing the Anthem of Disenfranchised Youth


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Marilyn Manson's The Nobodies at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

Today I’m dirty
I want to be pretty
Tomorrow I’ll know
I’m just dirt

Today I’m dirty
I want to be pretty
Tomorrow I’ll know
I’m just dirt

Feel the nobodies
Wanna be somebodies
We’re dead
We know just who we are

Feel the nobodies
Wanna be somebodies
We’re dead
We know just who we are

Yesterday I was dirty
I wanted to be pretty
Know now
That I’m forever dirt

Yesterday I was dirty
Wanted to be pretty
I know now
That I’m forever dirt

Feel the nobodies
Wanna be somebodies
We’re dead
We know just who we are

Feel the nobodies
Wanna be somebodies
We’re dead
We know just who we are

Some children died the other day
We fed machines and then we prayed
Puked up and down in morbid faith
You should have seen the ratings that day

Some children died the other day
We fed machines and then we prayed
Puked up and down in morbid faith
You should have seen the ratings that day

Na, na, na, na, na
Na, na, na, na, na
Na, na, na, na, na
Na, na, na, na

We are the nobodies (Na, na, na, na, na)
Wanna be somebodies (Na, na, na, na, na)
We’re dead (Na, na, na, na, na)
We know just who we are (Na, na, na, na, na)

We are the nobodies (Na, na, na, na, na)
Wanna be somebodies (Na, na, na, na, na)
We’re dead
We know just who we are

Feel the nobodies
Wanna be somebodies
We’re dead
We know just who we are

Full Lyrics

In the catalog of Marilyn Manson’s dark anthems, ‘The Nobodies’ strikes a particularly resonant chord, weaving a haunting narrative of alienation and societal disaffection. It’s a poetic dissection of the desire for recognition in a world that all too often looks away, an exploration that Manson dives into with his characteristically unflinching gaze.

The title itself is a paradox – ‘The Nobodies’ becomes an anthem for ‘somebodies,’ at least in the eyes of those who find solace in Manson’s bleak poetics. Artists often encapsulate the zeitgeist of their era, and Manson, with his abrasive, confronting style, captures the darkness lurking at the edge of the early 2000s.

A Dance with Duality: Pretty and Dirt Intersect

The pursuit of beauty in a world preoccupied with surface-level aesthetics sets the stage for ‘The Nobodies.’ Manson juxtaposes the grimy with the glamorous, a commentary on the ephemeral nature of physical beauty and the societal obsession with it. This fixation on aesthetic transformation speaks volumes about the internal dialectic of self-worth and external validation.

His repetition of the phrases ‘I want to be pretty’ and ‘I’m just dirt’ drives home an existential despair. It’s a pendulum swing between a craving for significance and an acceptance of perceived worthlessness—two states of being Manson exposes as universally felt, yet rarely acknowledged so candidly in pop culture.

The Heartbeat of the Dispossessed

‘Feel the nobodies’ is not merely a line—it’s a rallying cry, a pulse pounding within the recesses of the outcast community. Manson serves as the mouthpiece for the marginalized, the voice that shouts from the shadowed corners of the mainstream. In ‘The Nobodies,’ disenchantment becomes a collective experience rather than a solitary burden.

With an audience that Manson understands intimately, he thrives in casting the spotlight on the forgotten and the frowned upon. ‘Wanna be somebodies,’ Manson seems to say, is not about craving fame but about demanding recognition for one’s inherent value, a yearning to be seen and to matter.

The Ratings of Our Morbid Curiosities

In a striking shift, Manson references a tragic event with the lines, ‘Some children died the other day.’ Here, he delivers a derisive take on the media’s exploitation of such horrors for ratings. It’s a powerful condemnation of how tragedy becomes a spectacle, one that is all too easily consumed and then discarded.

By highlighting the phrase ‘You should have seen the ratings that day,’ Manson doesn’t just point the finger at the media; he indicts an entire culture that’s been conditioned to feed on these morbid entertainments. The line is a mirror held up to society, reflecting the twisted way in which pain becomes a form of perverse entertainment.

The Paradox of Recognition: We’re Dead, We Know Just Who We Are

The dichotomy between the hunger for identity and the embrace of invisibility is breathtaking. ‘We know just who we are’ speaks to a self-awareness that defies conventional expectations. This isn’t about nihilism; it’s about the recognition of one’s own essence outside of society’s narrow labels and constraints.

Manson here twists the knife of irony—the disillusioned masses, ‘The Nobodies,’ claim a stronger sense of self than the ‘somebodies’ floundering in the limelight. It’s a subversion of the celebrity worship culture, a declaration that those who seemingly have no place and no name understand themselves far better than those bathed in adulation.

Memorable Lines That Epitomize Manson’s Mastery

When Manson weaves the words ‘Yesterday I was dirty, wanted to be pretty, I know now that I’m forever dirt’ into a melodic but disconcerting harmony, he crafts an echo that reverberates through the audience’s core. It’s a stark, naked admission that permanence lies not in fame or beauty, but in the legacy we leave.

The song’s acceptance of ‘dirt’ signifies not degradation, but the foundation of growth—a potential for rebirth and inherent worth that’s divorced from societal validation. Each phrase, dilettante in its simplicity, is laden with the profundity of Manson’s musings on the human quest for meaning amidst the chaos and callousness of the world.

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