(What A) Wonderful World – Unraveling the Mastery of Simplicity


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Sam Cooke's (What A) Wonderful World at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Breaking Down the Academic Versus Emotional Intelligence Divide
  5. The Universal Quest for Love and Understanding
  6. The Art of Crafting an Earworm: Memorable Lines that Stick
  7. The Hidden Meaning: A Call to Prioritize Passion over Precision
  8. A Timeless Legacy: Why Cooke’s Melodic Musings Still Matter

Lyrics

Don’t know much about history
Don’t know much biology
Don’t know much about a science book
Don’t know much about the french I took
But I do know that I love you
Snd I know that if you love me, too
What a wonderful world this would be

Don’t know much about geography
Don’t know much trigonometry
Don’t know much about algebra
Don’t know what a slide rule is for
But I know that one and one is two
And if this one could be with you
What a wonderful world this would be.

I don’t claim to be an ‘A’ student
But I’m tryin’ to be
For maybe by being an ‘A’-student, baby
I can win your love for me

Don’t know much about history
Don’t know much biology
Don’t know much about a science book
Don’t know much about the french I took
But I do know that I love you
And I know that if you love me, too
What a wonderful world this would be (La, ta, ta, tata, ta, ta)

History (Hmmmm)
Biology (Woah, la, ta, ta, tata, ta, ta)
Science book (Hmmmm)
French I took (Yeah)
But I do know that I love you,
And I know that if you love me, too
What a wonderful world this would be

Full Lyrics

In the pantheon of golden oldies, few shine as brightly as Sam Cooke’s ‘(What A) Wonderful World.’ A track that wraps its arms around the joy of simplicity and the breadth of human emotion. Cooke’s dulcet tones and honeyed delivery incite a warmth that has transcended generations, embedding the song as a timeless classic.

Layered with velvety vocals and a melody that swings you into an effortless groove, the song encapsulates more than just the innocence of love—it’s an ode to the significance of human connection over academic knowledge. Let’s delve into the heart of Cooke’s lyrical poetry and uncover the nuances that make this song an emblem of soulful clarity.

Breaking Down the Academic Versus Emotional Intelligence Divide

Cooke’s narrative starts with a candid confession of his educational shortcomings. From history to biology, and even the nuances of a ‘french I took,’ his confessions flow as a consistent disclaimer of what he doesn’t comprehend. But these admissions serve a larger purpose—juxtaposing the value of emotional intelligence against the backdrop of traditional academics.

As Cooke echoes his lack of prowess in formal disciplines, it becomes clear that the song is a celebration of an oft-overlooked kind of smart—the ability to love and be loved in return. This wisdom, Cooke argues, is the true harbinger of a ‘wonderful world.’

The Universal Quest for Love and Understanding

At the crux of the song’s irresistible charm is the universal truth of love’s transformative power. Hinging on the perennial belief that love can shape our reality, Cooke’s track speaks to a heartfelt authenticity that anyone who’s ever been in love can relate to.

The simplicity of the concept that ‘one and one is two’ doubles as a clever metaphor for partnership and unity. It’s in these basic human needs—connection, affection, companionship—that Cooke finds his solace, his definition of a world filled with wonder.

The Art of Crafting an Earworm: Memorable Lines that Stick

Sam Cooke knew the art of the hook. The repetition of ‘Don’t know much about…’ paired with the earnest segue into the emotional flipside, ‘But I do know that I love you,’ strikes a chord that resonates within the soul. It’s a lyrical loop, endearing in its simplicity, which remains etched in memory long after the song’s final note has faded.

Not only does the repetition make the song inherently singable, it boats a universal mantra for love’s precedence over all things complicated and cerebral. That Cooke can do this while barely skirting the surface of vast intellectual domains is a testament to his songwriting genius.

The Hidden Meaning: A Call to Prioritize Passion over Precision

While the surface level of the song revels in the joy and aspiration of young love, there’s a deeper current of pushback against the societal elevation of formal education above all other measures of value. Cooke suggests an alternative worldview, where success is not measured by grades or degrees, but by the capacity to feel and share love.

In this light, ‘(What A) Wonderful World’ is more than a poetic tryst—it embodies a critique on the over-intellectualization of success. Sam Cooke leverages his lyrical elegance to underscore the premise that in life’s grand tapestry, emotional connections are the threads that truly bind.

A Timeless Legacy: Why Cooke’s Melodic Musings Still Matter

Sam Cooke’s ‘(What A) Wonderful World’ endures, not least because of its melodic allure, but because it taps into a timeless and fundamental discourse. As new forms of learning and measures of intelligence gain recognition, the song’s message remains a poignant reminder that there are facets of human experience that transcend the tangible and quantifiable.

It is the authenticity of feeling—honest, unadorned, and raw—that continues to make Cooke’s harmonious musings relevant today. And it is in the collective admission that there is so much we don’t know that we find solace in the one universal truth Cooke so melodically encapsulates: love is the elemental force that makes ‘a wonderful world’ for us all.

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