Best – A Deep Dive into the Struggle of Self-Reflection


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Gracie Abrams's Best at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Echo of Lost Appetite: Grappling with Emotional Absence
  5. Confessions of a Silver Lining Destroyer
  6. The Addiction of Falsehoods and Isolation
  7. Dissecting the Emotional Fallout Over the Internet
  8. A Chorus That Resonates with Regret and Recognition

Lyrics

I was bored out my mind
Lost my whole appetite
When I could come to life, I didn’t
You were there all the time
You’re the worst of my crimes
You fell hard
I thought, good riddance

I never was the best to you
I never was the best to you
I never was
I never was

Used to lie to your face
Twenty times in a day
It was my little strange addiction
But you still tried to stay
While I’d self isolate
And I knew, but I stayed hidden

I never was the best to you
I never was the best to you
I never was
I never was
I never was the best to you
I never was the best to you
I never was
I never was

And I destroyed every silver lining you had in your head
All of your feelings, I played with them
Go ahead, we can just call it conditioning
We were too different
You were so sensitive
Gave me the best of that, I was so negligent
Now I feel terrible about how I handled it

And now I
Now I bet you resent all of me, all of it
Angry, blocking me over the internet
Promise, I don’t forget all of my fault in this
‘Cause look at me, I’m alone, sitting here, staying home
All of my self control kinda got difficult
But I deserve it though
I deserve it though

You were there, all the time
You’re the worst of my crimes
You fell hard
I thought, good riddance

I never was the best to you
I never was the best to you
I never was
I never was
Oh, I never was the best to you
I never was the best to you
I never was
I never was

Full Lyrics

Gracie Abrams is a master of channeling raw emotion into her music, capturing the essence of her generation’s anxiety, longing, and introspection. Her song ‘Best’ is a stark, poignant reflection on self-awareness and the aftermath of personal failings within intimate relationships. With a melody that pulls at the heartstrings, Abrams delivers a confession of her flaws, a tender acknowledgment of her own shortcomings.

The ballad’s lyrics are a blend of remorse and candid self-examination, a dialogue between the artist and her past self. Abrams dissects the relationship, mining for the truth in her actions, ultimately exposing the pain she caused. ‘Best’ is more than just a song; it is an emotional exposé, laying bare the struggle between the desire to be better and the recognition of one’s limitations.

The Echo of Lost Appetite: Grappling with Emotional Absence

Abrams opens the song with a confession of detachment, detailing a time when emotional numbness held her back from fully engaging in life. ‘Bored out my mind, lost my whole appetite’ suggests not just a lack of interest but also the loss of desire – for food, for life, for love. This line sets the tone for a narrative about someone who has been emotionally unavailable.

The appetite—often a metaphor for passion and zest—becomes a casualty in this tale. When Abrams could have been vibrant and alive in the relationship, she remained withdrawn, hinting at the difficulty some face in making themselves vulnerable, even when the opportunity for connection is right in front of them.

Confessions of a Silver Lining Destroyer

Abrams doesn’t shy away from acknowledging her role in tarnishing the hopeful aspects of the relationship. ‘I destroyed every silver lining you had in your head’ is an unabashed admission of her destructive impact on her partner’s optimism. The imagery of destroying a silver lining implies not just a momentary lapse but an ongoing pattern of ruining moments that held promise.

This line encapsulates the heart of the song’s message: a confrontation of one’s darker side and the pain inflicted on others. It is a solemn walk through the graveyard of what could have been, with Abrams serving as both the mourner and the cause of the relationship’s demise.

The Addiction of Falsehoods and Isolation

Abrams paints a picture of a troubled individual who lies compulsively, admitting to ‘lie to your face, twenty times in a day.’ The repetition underscores the extent and frequency of deceit—a self-proclaimed ‘strange addiction.’ Such confessions provide a window into the complexity of her relationship, where dishonesty was a coping mechanism.

Simultaneously, she acknowledges a tendency to ‘self isolate,’ which acts as a self-imposed barrier to sincerity and intimacy. The jarring contrast between these admissions and the partner’s willingness to stay illustrates the one-sided resilience of the relationship, further deepening the sense of guilt and regret conveyed in the music.

Dissecting the Emotional Fallout Over the Internet

As modern relationships often play out in the digital arena, Abrams’ references to the internet resonate with the zeitgeist. ‘Angry, blocking me over the internet’ isn’t simply about social media interactions; it’s about seeking space in a world where our lives are inextricably linked online.

The lyrics address how the digital footprint of a relationship can linger, complicating the process of healing and moving on. It’s a contemporary nod to the ways young love is navigated and demolished in the digital age, reflecting the intensification of emotional experiences through the screens we can’t seem to turn off.

A Chorus That Resonates with Regret and Recognition

Gracie Abrams’s chorus is simple yet striking, an echoing refrain of self-acknowledgment. ‘I never was the best to you’ becomes a mantra of regret, the repetition highlighting the consistent failure to live up to the expectations of the partnership. It suggests a continual struggle to be better and the artist’s resignation to her imperfections.

This phrase, haunting in its delivery, captures the essence of the song, offering a raw glimpse into human fallibility. As listeners, we are drawn into our own reflections, considering how often we fall short of being our best selves for those we love. The candid simplicity of the chorus serves as the bridge between Abrams’s personal revelations and the universal human experience she uncovers through her lyrics.

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