Better Times by Beach House Lyrics Meaning – Unraveling the Mystique of Melancholy in Indie Dream Pop


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Beach House's Better Times at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

I want you to know the truth
‘Cause I’ve been around before
Thought I wasn’t looking anymore

Been a fool for weeks
‘Cause my heart stands for nothing and your soul’s too weak
Got a will that’s been around for days
Goes far if you want it
It needs to behave

But then you, you come around
Big mistake

I don’t want to know
I don’t want to know
We don’t need the sign to know better times

Running around ’cause you beat yourself up
And you made a crack and the one that you love is gone
How much longer can you play with fire before you turn into a liar?

Running around ’cause you beat yourself up
And you made a crack and the one that you love is gone
How much longer can you play with fire before you turn into a liar?

I’ve been around before
Thought you weren’t looking anymore
But then we, we come and go, go up in smoke

I don’t want to know
I don’t want to know
We don’t need the sign to know better times

Full Lyrics

In the dreamy tapestry of indie music, Beach House stands as a monolith of the dream pop genre, weaving through its melodies a sense of longing and introspection that is both intimate and universal. Their song ‘Better Times’ invites listeners into a labyrinth of emotion, balancing on the knife-edge between the ethereal and the painfully tangible.

But what lies beneath the gossamer surface of this hauntingly beautiful track? The following deep dive into ‘Better Times’ peels back the layers of its lyrics to discover not just the undeniable charm of Beach House’s sonic world, but the rich tapestry of meaning that makes the song a beacon of contemporary lyrics-driven music.

The Specter of Past Love: Nostalgia or Caution?

When Beach House’s vocalist Victoria Legrand opens with ‘I want you to know the truth / ‘Cause I’ve been around before,’ there’s an immediate sense of experience and weariness that cloaks the song. It communicates an awareness that stems from past relationships, a knowledge that could only come from the reflection of better times now disappeared into the rearview mirror.

This is not just a simple case of nostalgia, though. The song seems to warn against the idealization of ‘better times,’ suggesting a skepticism of whether those times were truly as golden as memory paints them or if they are a mirage designed to distract from the present’s challenges.

A Heart Scorned and A Soul Too Weak

In the lines ‘Been a fool for weeks / ‘Cause my heart stands for nothing and your soul’s too weak,’ Beach House touches on the vulnerability that accompanies love. The notion of being a fool suggests a kind of self-awareness, an acknowledgement of willingly playing the part to service one’s heart, despite knowing the fragility of the soul in question.

The lyrics address a desperation for connection, yet they also hint at a disparity of power: one person’s steadfast heart pitted against another’s faint spirit. This imbalance, implied in the song, speaks volumes about the dynamics of desire and the eventual dissolution of love.

A Carousel of Self-Destructiveness

As the song progresses, ‘Running around ’cause you beat yourself up’ the imagery of a person in turmoil becomes apparent. It is as if the realization of mistakes made in love leads to a cycle of self-flagellation, a punishment that only ends when all is lost.

Beach House masterfully paints a portrait of a lover beating themselves up emotionally, churning through pain as they reflect on the crumbling of a relationship. The cyclical nature of the lyrics hints at this ceaseless inner turmoil, mirroring how we oftentimes replay our blunders.

Uncovering the Song’s Hidden Meaning – Fire and Lies

‘How much longer can you play with fire before you turn into a liar?’ This question captures the essence of the song’s warning. It suggests that the longer we linger on misguided hope, the greater the risk we run of betraying ourselves, perhaps even becoming something we are not – a liar.

Through the metaphor of fire, ‘Better Times’ evokes the danger of clinging to past loves and the destructive potential it harbors for the self. There is an implication that beneath the veneer of affection and memory, there may lie self-deception and the looming threat of self-destruction.

Recurring Visions: Memorable Lines that Haunt

Certain phrases in ‘Better Times’ echo in the mind long after the song fades out. ‘We don’t need the sign to know better times’ is one of those lyrical refrains that sticks. It’s a declaration that the past does not hold some secret key to happiness; rather, it’s often a signpost we misread.

Another unforgettable line, ‘But then we, we come and go, go up in smoke,’ reflects the transience of relationships and happiness. It encapsulates the ephemeral nature of life’s joys, underscoring the bitter truth that often, what is most cherished is just as quickly lost to the winds of time.

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