Blood On Our Hands – Decoding the Intricate Layers of Human Relationships


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Death From Above 1979's Blood On Our Hands at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Stepping Into the Basement: A Metaphor for Emotional Refuge
  5. The Inescapable Stain of Interpersonal Conflict
  6. A Closer Look at the Song’s Undisclosed Narrative
  7. Dissecting the Imprint of Memory and Desire
  8. Reflections on Absolution and the Cycle of Catharsis

Lyrics

I am leaving while you turn away
In the basement is where I’m gonna stay
There is blood in all the things I say
Will you hate me if I stay this way?
From the bedroom, where we’re running from
There’s a sequel to the things I’ve done
You’re a woman, we both know it’s true
By the things that I have done to you

There is blood on all the shoes you’ve worn
From the people you’ve been stepping on
There is blood in all the things you say
I won’t hate you if you go away

There is blood on our hands again
From the bedroom is where we will
Bring it back to the start again
Bring it back to the love we had

There is blood on our hands again
From the bedroom is where we will
Bring it back to the love we had
Bring it back to

I am leaving if you turn away
In the basement is where I’m gonna stay
From the bedroom, where I’m running from
There’s a sequel to the things I’ve done

There is blood on our hands again
From the bedroom is where we will
Bring it back to the start again
Bring it back to the love we had

There is blood on our hands again
From the bedroom is where we will
Bring it back to the start again
Bring it back to

Full Lyrics

In their searing track ‘Blood On Our Hands,’ Death From Above 1979 confronts the listener with a turbulent discourse on guilt and accountability within the dynamics of intimacy. With its pulsating rhythm and raw, unapologetic vulnerability, the song transcends mere lyrical expression to echo the grim dance of human interaction.

The duo, known for their electrifying fusion of punk rock and heavy bass lines, delve into the emotional spectrum that renders the stark contrast between love’s purity and the sanguine aftermath of its complexities. As we peel back the veneer of their artistic expression, we grapple with the universal themes etched into the fabric of the song.

Stepping Into the Basement: A Metaphor for Emotional Refuge

The mention of the basement, a common refuge in the architecture of a home, speaks to the intrinsic human desire to find sanctuary amid internal turmoil. It’s a place of isolation, where one might retreat when faced with the intolerable weight of their emotional baggage. The song’s protagonist seems to seek refuge in the depths to evade the scrutiny that the light of day casts.

Through its metaphorical use, the basement also evokes thoughts of secrets being kept hidden away from the world. It becomes a representation of the darker aspects of our psyche, the part that we choose to suppress or hide from those around us. The insistent question ‘Will you hate me if I stay this way?’ reveals the apprehension of being seen in one’s full, unfiltered truth.

The Inescapable Stain of Interpersonal Conflict

The phrase ‘There is blood on our hands again’ reverberates as a haunting refrain throughout the song, symbolizing the conflicts and wrongdoings that mar human relationships. Blood, a metaphor for guilt and the aftermath of actions, stains the characters, symbolizing a history of mutual harm. This chorus-like admission is not only a confrontation but a stark acknowledgment of the cyclical nature of hurt within close bonds.

By repeating this line with emphasis, the songwriters compellingly bring forth the notion that mistakes are recurrent, and the ‘blood’, once spilt, may never truly be cleansed. It suggests a kind of existential resignation to the flawed nature of human relations, but it also quietly raises the specter of hope for renewal and redressal.

A Closer Look at the Song’s Undisclosed Narrative

We encounter a parallel narrative just beneath the surface, a tale of defiance and the endurance of love, darkened by personal failures. ‘There’s a sequel to the things I’ve done’ almost reads like a confession, an understanding that actions ripple through time, and consequences are seldom linear. The ‘bedroom’ emerges as a significant locale – a space for intimacy corrupted by undisclosed transgressions.

Nonetheless, these lyrics present a twofold message: while the protagonist is aware of the repercussions of his or her actions, there is also an unyielding desire to restore what was once pure and unsoiled. Therein lies the tension of ‘Blood On Our Hands,’ the constant tug between realization and amendment, desire and regret, action and reaction.

Dissecting the Imprint of Memory and Desire

Amongst the most stirring lines of the song, ‘From the people you’ve been stepping on,’ hits with the force of an emotional indictment, pointing to the exploitation and manipulation that can sour human connections. This line, which is an attack on the conscience, manifests the latent aggression that coexists with vulnerability in the song’s tonal landscape.

Similar to how one never forgets the pain inflicted upon them, neither do they forget the source of their profound affections—the ‘love we had.’ The duality here is crucial; for as much as the song serves as a recognition of damage caused, it also serves as a testament to the indelible impression that genuine emotions leave, the yearning to turn back time to moments of untainted affection.

Reflections on Absolution and the Cycle of Catharsis

Crucially, ‘Blood On Our Hands’ doesn’t just wallow in remorse; it carries a subliminal message about the human capacity for redemption. ‘Bring it back to the start again’ isn’t a mere plea for a second chance; it’s a call to a fundamental reconnection with the essence of the relationship before it was tarnished.

This lyrical gesture towards absolution touches on the transformative potential of facing one’s transgressions. It implies that the blood can be interpreted not only as a symbol of guilt but also as one of rebirth—akin to the shedding of old skin in favor of new beginnings. DFA 1979 captures a snapshot of the intricate process of healing, laying bare the raw hope for the rekindling of love amidst regret and awareness of one’s flaws.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like...