Remember Everything – Unraveling the Shadows of Familial Regrets


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Five Finger Death Punch's Remember Everything at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Haunting Melody of Regret
  5. An Open Letter to Family Long Gone
  6. The Siren Call of Isolation and the Road to Self-Acceptance
  7. Diving into the Song’s Hidden Meaning: Hope Amid Sorrow
  8. Memorable Lines that Resonate Through Time

Lyrics

Oh, dear mother, I love you
I’m sorry, I wasn’t good enough
Dear father, forgive me
‘Cause in your eyes, I just never added up
In my heart I know I failed you
But you left me here alone

If I could hold back the rain
Would you numb the pain
‘Cause I remember everything
If I could help you forget
Would you take my regrets
‘Cause I remember everything

Oh, dear brother, just don’t hate me
For never standing by you or being by your side
Dear sister, please don’t blame me
I only did what I thought was truly right
It’s a long and lonely road
When you know you walk alone

If I could hold back the rain
Would you numb the pain
‘Cause I remember everything
If I could help you forget
Would you take my regrets
‘Cause I remember everything

I feel like running away
I’m still so far from home
You say that I’ll never change
But what the fuck do you know
I’ll burn it all to the ground before I let you run
Please forgive me, I can’t forgive you now
I remember everything

If I could hold back the rain, would you numb the pain
‘Cause I remember everything
If I could help you forget, would you take my regrets
‘Cause I remember everything

It all went by so fast
I still can’t change the past
I always will remember everything
If we could start again
Would that change the end
We remember everything
Everything

Full Lyrics

Five Finger Death Punch’s ballad ‘Remember Everything’ off their third album ‘American Capitalist,’ released in 2011, stands out as an emotional departure from their harder metal roots. The song is a piercing narrative that slices through the facade of stoicism often associated with heavy metal.

It’s a vulnerable confession of regret, sorrow, and the eternal quest for forgiveness. The melody and poignant lyrics weave a powerful tapestry of the human condition, underscored by the universal struggle to reconcile with one’s past mistakes and the haunting desire for familial redemption.

The Haunting Melody of Regret

The song’s composition is masterfully crafted, weaving a melody that’s at once haunting and healing. It’s the musical embodiment of heartache, the kind that reverberates through the bones long after the last chord fades. ‘Remember Everything’ bucks the electric intensity typically found in Five Finger Death Punch’s music for introspective acoustics and a serenade of sorrow.

The emotive vocals delivered with a sincerity that can only come from lived experiences make the lyrics punch through with an additional weight. The stark contrast between the verses’ quiet reflections and the anthemic chorus mirrors the tumultuous emotional landscape the song navigates.

An Open Letter to Family Long Gone

Serving as an open letter to the familial figures in his life, frontman Ivan Moody’s lyrics are a gut-wrenching admission of perceived failures. With ‘Oh, dear mother, I love you,’ and ‘Dear father, forgive me,’ he sets the tone of an apology that’s raw and almost unfiltered through the lens of rock bravado. It’s as though he’s reaching across a chasm of time and misunderstandings to touch the hearts of loved ones he fears he’s let down.

The thematic elements resonate with anyone who’s ever felt like the black sheep of the family, those struggling to measure up to sometimes unspoken family expectations. The desperation in seeking forgiveness, ’cause in your eyes, I just never added up,’ is a universal cry for acceptance and understanding.

The Siren Call of Isolation and the Road to Self-Acceptance

Isolation is a recurrent theme in ‘Remember Everything,’ with lyrics like ‘It’s a long and lonely road / When you know you walk alone’ encapsulating the internal journey many embark on while dealing with past traumas and regrets. The lines speak to the solitude that can accompany self-reflection, a solitary path of confronting one’s demons and eventually finding self-acceptance.

Moody doesn’t shy away from displaying vulnerability, contrasting the often aggressive front seen in metal with the softer, more fragile aspects of his humanity. This duality is an invitation for listeners to also embrace their multiplicity, peeling back the layers of defense to reveal the intricate depths of pain and the capacity for growth.

Diving into the Song’s Hidden Meaning: Hope Amid Sorrow

Beyond the overt narrative of familial strife, ‘Remember Everything’ subtly touches on the concept of personal transformation against the backdrop of forgiveness and regret. The repetition of ‘If I could hold back the rain, would you numb the pain?’ isn’t just a plea for alleviating their own hurt, but also a metaphorical wish to erase the pain they’ve caused others.

The lyric ‘I’ll burn it all to the ground before I let you run’ suggests an almost self-destructive refusal to let go, a testament to the strength of the ties that bind us to our past and to the people within it. It’s through remembering ‘everything’ that the possibility for real change is born – not in forgetting, but in the powerful act of acknowledgment and moving forward with that knowledge.

Memorable Lines that Resonate Through Time

Lines like ‘I feel like running away / I’m still so far from home’ and ‘I always will remember everything’ are seared into the collective conscious of the listeners. They encapsulate the yearning to escape from one’s regrets while simultaneously acknowledging that no matter the distance one runs, the past is an indelible part of us.

The song’s closing lines ponder a poignant question: ‘If we could start again / Would that change the end?’ It’s a contemplation capturing the longing for a second chance, mingling with the acknowledgment that some things cannot be undone. There’s a bittersweet acceptance that the past is immutable, and yet, it’s this very permanence that informs our present and shapes our future. ‘Remember Everything’ is, in essence, an ode to the scars that we carry and the hope that they make us wiser and more compassionate with each other.

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