The View From The Afternoon by Arctic Monkeys Lyrics Meaning – Diving Deep Into the Expectations of Modern Youth


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Arctic Monkeys's The View From The Afternoon at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

Anticipation has a habit to set you up
For disappointment in evening entertainment but
Tonight there’ll be some love
Tonight there’ll be a ruckus, yeah, regardless of what’s gone before
I want to see all of the things that we’ve already seen
The lairy girls hung out the window of the limousine
Of course it’s fancy dress
And they’re all looking quite forlorn in bunny ears and devil horns and how

Anticipation has a habit to set you up
For disappointment in evening entertainment but
Tonight there’ll be some love
Tonight there’ll be a ruckus, yeah, regardless of what’s gone before
I want to see all of the things that we’ve already seen

I wanna see you take the jackpot out the fruit machine
And put it all back in
You’ve got to understand that you can never beat the bandit, no

And she won’t be surprised and she won’t be shocked
When she’s pressed the star after she’s pressed unlock
And there’s verse and chapter sat in her inbox
And all that is said is that you’ve drank a lot

And you should bear that in mind tonight
Bear that in mind, yeah
You should bear that in mind tonight
Bear that in mind

And you can pour your heart out
For a reason it would block
Oh, you send her after nine o’clock

Anticipation has a habit to set you up
For disappointment in evening entertainment but
Tonight there’ll be some love
Tonight there’ll be a ruckus, yeah, regardless of what’s gone before

And she won’t be surprised and she won’t be shocked
When she’s pressed the star after she’s pressed unlock
And there’s verse and chapter sat in her inbox
And all that is said is that you’ve drank a lot

And you should bear that in mind tonight
Bear that in mind, yeah
You should bear that in mind tonight
Bear that in mind

And you can pour your heart out
Around three o’clock
When the two-for-ones have done the writer’s block

Full Lyrics

Enigmatic in its narrative and electrifying in its delivery, ‘The View From The Afternoon’ by Arctic Monkeys serves as a razor-sharp critique of the hedonistic anticipation and the inevitable disillusionment that tailgates youthful nightlife. Through a gritty analysis of its profound lyrics, we decode the raw energy encapsulated within the anthem of a generation’s prelude to dusk.

The Sheffield quartet, known for their keen observational lyricism, encapsulates the restless spirit of post-millennial Britain within the opening chords of their debut album ‘Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not.’ Exploring themes of desire, consequence, and the cyclic nature of pursuit, this track is a jagged yet introspective look into the pre-party psyche.

Anticipation vs Reality: The Buildup to Disappointment

Deploying a relentless staccato of crisp drums and infectious riffs, the Arctic Monkeys illustrate the dichotomy between the thrill of anticipation and the comedown of reality. The recurring phrase ‘Anticipation has a habit to set you up for disappointment in evening entertainment’ becomes a mantra for the modern carouser, encapsulating the dizzy highs before a night out and the sobering lows as lights go up.

The track delves into the fabric of nighttime escapades, the quest for something monumental despite the repetitive nature of such events. The infinite loop of seeking excitement and ending in disenchantment is as much a reflection on personal longing as it is a societal snapshot of the era’s youth culture.

The Subtle Tragedy of Hedonism

As the Monkeys narrate the unruly spectacle of ‘lairy girls’ and partygoers in ‘fancy dress,’ there lies an undercurrent of pathos. The feelings of forlorn masked by bunny ears and devil horns gesture towards the masquerade of joy, subtly questioning if beneath the raucous veneer, the repetition of such evenings leads to any genuine fulfillment.

The portrayal is visceral, the devil-may-care revelry contrasted with a haunting desolation that seems to linger like the echo of the last chord played. With the nightlife painted as a carousel, spinning with the same faces and scenes, listeners are urged to ponder the paradox of seeking connection in spaces predefined by their disconnection.

Jackpots and Fruit Machines: A Metaphor for the Unwinnable

Alex Turner, the lead singer and lyricist, couches profound insights within the clever metaphor of gambling. The futile efforts of trying to ‘beat the bandit’ at the fruit machines mirror the larger game of love and life, an allegory for the relentless human endeavor to pursue what often seems just out of reach.

The imagery signifies not just the physical act of throwing one’s winnings back in hopes of a greater reward but also the emotional gamble of pouring oneself into ventures that prudently, we know are doomed. It’s a gambit played against a dealer known as fate, where the house always wins but the thrill of the play is irresistible.

Unraveling the Hidden Meaning: Unlocking the Verse and Chapter

The mention of ‘pressed the star after she’s pressed unlock’ and ‘verse and chapter sat in her inbox’ might well portray modern communication’s shortcomings – a relentless stream of information and confession that fails to bridge the distance between individuals. The simplicity of shared experiences conveyed in danced-out nights and blurry-text exchanges rings hollow when measured against the reality of intimate connection.

The song implicates a narrative where even the most personal outpourings – ‘verse and chapter’ sent digitally – are diluted into casual notifications accompanied by the casual addendum that ‘you’ve drank a lot.’ It’s a commentary on how the modern means of communication can ironically lead to more profound disconnection.

Memorable Lines: The Poet’s Guide to the Nightlife

The song culminates in a poignant, almost Orwellian observation that ‘you can pour your heart out around three o’clock. When the two-for-ones have done the writer’s block.’ It’s a raw expression of vulnerability that only seems to flow when the night has stripped away the veneer, and the reveler is left confronting their own naked emotions – a time when inhibitions fall away, and the real, unedited self-talk begins.

It’s these moments, Turner seems to say, where the truest form of expression is found – not in the foreplay of the evening’s anticipation nor the midst of its chaotic zenith, but in the unguarded aftermath. In this light, ‘The View From The Afternoon’ becomes a siren song for the nocturnal truth-seekers and the somber poets of the afterparty.

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