80’s Comedown Machine – Exploring Nostalgia and Disillusionment Through Verse


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for The Strokes's 80's Comedown Machine at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Haunting Pull of the Past: Retro Vibes and Regret
  5. Crawling Back Inside: The Dichotomy of Progress and Retrogression
  6. The Siren’s Call to Escape: Run Away and Find Solace
  7. Unearthing the Hidden Gem: The Track’s Deeper Message
  8. Lingering Lines: Echoes of a Generation

Lyrics

It’s not the first time I’m watchin’ you passin’ by
I’ve tried too hard to get back there, but you’re not on time anymore
Tried to believe in you for a second time
You said the world’s closed in but you’re crawlin’ back inside

So please
Run away
So please
Run away

I tried to believe in it for a second try
It’s there in the safe, why don’t you
Close the blinds
For the night?

So please
Run away
So please
Run away

So please
Run away
So please
Run away
So please
Run away
Run away

Full Lyrics

In the labyrinth of modern music, The Strokes stand as watchguards of rock, their sound a beacon of both past and future sensibilities. ’80’s Comedown Machine,’ a track shrouded in synth and enigma from their album of the same name, beckons listeners into a world both foreign and intimately known. The song, while brief in lyrical length, spins a tapestry of nostalgia, yearning, and the haunting nature of time slipping inevitably through our fingers.

The Strokes, known for their poetic ambiguity and alt-rock edge, often weave deeper meanings into their seemingly straightforward lyrics. ’80’s Comedown Machine’ carries a weight that is not immediately discernible upon first listen, unfolding layers of emotional complexity with every play. To unearth the heart of this track is to venture into a reflective journey through the ghosts of past decades, relationships, and the relentless march of change.

The Haunting Pull of the Past: Retro Vibes and Regret

Engulfed by the magnetic pull of retro allure, ’80’s Comedown Machine’ oscillates between the yearning for bygone times and the pangs of realizing that those times cannot be resurrected. The lyrics ‘It’s not the first time I’m watchin’ you passin’ by’ invoke a sense of recurring longing, a specter of memory that refuses to rest. The almost voyeuristic helplessness in witnessing the relentless passage of time echoes the universal sorrow of wishing to return to a particular moment — only to find that the portal has irrevocably closed.

The term ‘comedown machine’ itself can be interpreted as a mechanism which brings one back to sober reality after the highs of the ’80s — a decade known for its ostentatious flair and hedonistic abandon. The Strokes seem to grasp at the remnants of these times, representing figures disillusioned by the brightness of the past now dimmed. The synth-infused sound of the song, steeped in an 80’s aura, is the aural representation of nostalgic comedown colliding with modernity.

Crawling Back Inside: The Dichotomy of Progress and Retrogression

Within the track, we see a struggle between progression and regression: ‘Tried to believe in you for a second time / You said the world’s closed in but you’re crawlin’ back inside.’ There is a poignant dichotomy here — on one hand, the narrator wants to move forward and believe in something (or someone) anew; on the other, there is an admission of the world closing in, an overwhelming feeling leading to a retreat.

The song suggests a kind of protective cocooning, a desire to hide away from the inexorable complexity and pain of the external world. When the call to ‘close the blinds for the night’ is made, it is a profound moment of chosen blindness, a rebellious act against the assault of change. The message is a paradox — the acknowledgment of a need for escape paired with the recognition of the futility of running from progress.

The Siren’s Call to Escape: Run Away and Find Solace

One of the most striking elements of ’80’s Comedown Machine’ is the repetitive plea to ‘Run away.’ This refrain becomes a siren’s call throughout the song — an enticing whisper to flee from the discomforts of the present. It is both an invocation for personal liberation and a somber acknowledgment of a natural human impulse to flee from pain or difficulty.

The urgency and repetition of the phrase imply a desperation, a crucial need for reprieve. Yet, beneath its surface, lies an undercurrent of futility. The act of running away is temporary, a short-lived remedy — like trying to outpace your own shadow. The song encapsulates the bitter sweetness of escapism, the allure of finding solace even if we understand that we can’t truly outrun the memories or the inherent complications of life.

Unearthing the Hidden Gem: The Track’s Deeper Message

Beyond the melancholic, synthesizer-infused melodies and the ethereal repetition of the lyrics, ’80’s Comedown Machine’ conceals a profound rumination on the human condition. The track covertly examines the ways individuals deal with the inescapable passage of time, with disappointment, and with the longing for what was or what could have been — be it life, love, or the zeitgeist of an entire decade.

Additionally, the machine-like, automated sensation of the song’s production may serve as a subtle commentary on the over-industrialized, tech-obsessed culture we’ve become, one that often causes a yearning for a seemingly simpler, bygone era. The Strokes implore the listener to consider the implications of our modern ‘safe,’ and the temporal nature of seeking shelter within it. Is it protection or confinement? Freedom or a self-made prison? These questions resonate at the song’s core, inviting introspection.

Lingering Lines: Echoes of a Generation

Among the poignant verses of ’80’s Comedown Machine,’ certain lines stand as memorials to a generation’s collective psyche. Lyrics such as ‘Tried to believe in it for a second try / It’s there in the safe, why don’t you close the blinds’ encapsulate the ethos of an era coming to terms with its place in the grand frame of history.

These words are hauntingly beautiful, an epitaph for youthful optimism now tempered by sobering realism. The song, in these memorably mournful lines, speaks without saying, sings without sound, exuding the introspective silence of a room with closed blinds — where we, alone with our thoughts, are left to ponder the comings and goings of years, of people, of dreams deferred and times forever encapsulated in the amber of music.

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