Good for You – Decoding the Desire for Approval and Beauty Standards


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Selena Gomez's Good for You at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Gaze into the Mirror of Self-Perception
  5. The Pulse of Romance and Its Influence on Identity
  6. Unraveling the Intimacy Behind the ‘Good for You’ Facade
  7. Lyrical Odes to Confidence and the Shadows They Cast
  8. The Hidden Meaning: Peeling Back the Layers of ‘Good for You’

Lyrics

I’m on my 14 carats
I’m 14 carat
Doing it up like Midas
Now you say I got a touch
So good, so good
Make you never wanna leave
So don’t, so don’t

Gonna wear that dress you like, skin-tight
Do my hair up real, real nice
And syncopate my skin to your heart beating

‘Cause I just wanna look good for you, good for you, oh-oh
I just wanna look good for you, good for you, oh-oh
Let me show you how proud I am to be yours
Leave this dress a mess on the floor
Still look good for you, good for you, oh-oh

I’m on my marquise diamonds
I’m a marquise diamond
Could even make that Tiffany jealous
You say I give it to you hard
So bad, so bad
Make you never wanna leave
I won’t, I won’t

Gonna wear that dress you like, skin-tight
Do my hair up real, real nice
And syncopate my skin to how you’re breathing

‘Cause I just wanna look good for you, good for you, oh-oh
I just wanna look good for you, good for you, oh-oh
Let me show you how proud I am to be yours
Leave this dress a mess on the floor
Still look good for you, good for you, oh-oh, oh-oh, oh
Oh-oh, oh-oh, oh

Trust me, I can take you there
Trust me, I can take you there
Trust me, I, trust me, I, trust me, I

Hold up, take a minute, love
‘Cause I ain’t tryna fuck your image up
More than likely mess around in triple cuffs
Stumble ’round town, pull your zipper up
Pants sag like I don’t give a
I ain’t tryna fuck your business up
And I ain’t tryna get you into stuff
But the way you touchin’ on me in the club
Rubbin’ on my miniature
John Hancock, fuck a signature
Any time I hit it, know she finna fall through
And every time we get up, always end up on the news
Ain’t worried ’bout no press, and ain’t worried ’bout the next bitch
They love the way you dress and ain’t got shit up on you
Jackpot, hit the jackpot
Just met a bad miss without the ass shots, haha
You look good, girl, you know you did good, don’t you?
You look good, girl, bet it feel good, don’t it? (Haha)

I just wanna look good for you, good for you, oh-oh
Baby, let me be good to you, good to you, oh-oh
Let me show you how proud I am to be yours
Leave this dress a mess on the floor
Still look good for you, good for you, oh-oh, oh-oh, oh
Oh-oh, oh-oh

Trust me, I, trust me, I, trust me, I

Full Lyrics

Selena Gomez’s sultry hit ‘Good for You’ is not just a chart-topping melody; it’s a labyrinth of desire, self-worth, and the quest for beauty in the eyes of another. The song, which features the singer’s intimate vocals intertwined with an atmospheric beat, pulls back the curtain to reveal the complexities that lie behind the pursuit of looking and feeling attractive for someone else.

While on the surface the lyrics may appear as a straightforward narrative of wanting to impress a lover, there is a deeper layer that begs exploration. It’s this nuanced dichotomy between empowerment and vulnerability that makes ‘Good for You’ an anthem worth dissecting.

A Gaze into the Mirror of Self-Perception

Gomez’s repeated declaration of wanting to ‘look good for you’ is not merely a statement of intent, it is a reflection of the deep-seated human need to be seen as desirable. This is heightened in the pop culture sphere, where appearances can often dictate the value that is placed upon individuals, especially women. The lyrics encapsulate the pressure to maintain an image that meets external expectations, a sentiment that Gomez delivers with a vulnerability that resonates with many who share the struggle.

The mention of ’14 carats’ and ‘marquise diamonds’ isn’t simply about wealth or luxury; it’s a metaphor for self-worth and the constant strive for perfection in the eyes of our beholders. This brilliance, akin to the shine of a well-cut gem, is what the singer aims to embody, hoping it will reflect back the feelings she seeks.

The Pulse of Romance and Its Influence on Identity

Synchronizing one’s skin to another’s heartbeat – the lyrics point towards the intimate act of adapting oneself to match the rhythm of a partner’s desires. Here Gomez illustrates the coalescence of two beings, not just physically but emotionally, and the lengths one might go to ensure that unison remains seamless.

‘Gonna wear that dress you like, skin-tight’ isn’t just about dressing to please. It is also symbolic of the tightrope walked between self-appreciation and the danger of losing one’s identity within the bounds of a relationship. The physicality of her words denotes a conscious change, molding oneself into someone else’s ideal.

Unraveling the Intimacy Behind the ‘Good for You’ Facade

At a glance, ‘Good for You’ might be mistaken for a simple love song, but the thoughtful listener will find an underlying message of power dynamics. The song wrestles with the control we relinquish when we overtly seek another’s approval. The agency in selecting the dress and the assertion of looking ‘good for you’ can quickly become a double-edged sword – it is both an expression of choice and an admission of being influenced by the desires of another.

As she pledges to ‘look good for you,’ the artist taps into the often unspoken exchange that occurs in moments of intimacy: the desire for acceptance and the subtle performance that comes with it. These lines don’t merely convey affection; they raise questions about the autonomy we maintain as we try to balance our happiness with the expectations of our partners.

Lyrical Odes to Confidence and the Shadows They Cast

Through phrases like ‘I’m on my marquise diamonds’ and ‘Could even make that Tiffany jealous,’ Gomez’s song stirs up the complicated dialogue surrounding self-confidence and external validation. The singer connects with feelings of empowerment, even as she underscores the relentless comparisons that society fosters.

It’s a tightrope between celebrating oneself and seeking confirmation from others. The duality here is significant – while she basks in confidence, the allusion to jealousy and competition suggests a lurking insecurity. It’s this balance that makes the song relatable to many, encapsulating the dance between self-acceptance and the hunger for affirmation.

The Hidden Meaning: Peeling Back the Layers of ‘Good for You’

‘Good for You’ does more than dwell in the space of romantic interlude; it serves as a commentary on the deep-seated issues of identity and self-esteem that haunt contemporary society. The constant interplay between self-assurance and the seeking of approval casts a spotlight on the internal dialogues that inform our public facades.

The song’s memorability lies in Gomez’s ability to weave these themes into a tapestry that feels both personal and universal. With each nuanced line, she invites listeners into a private room of reflection where the looking glass shows not just one’s own reflection, but the collective soul-searching of a generation poised between rebellion and conformity.

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