Other People by Beach House Lyrics Meaning – Unveiling the Melancholy of Disconnection


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Beach House's Other People at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

So you thought it would happen
Good love, goodbye
I know where no one can reach you
No, I don’t mind
It’s your world, why would you fake it?
These days go by
As you turn around-ow-ow-ow

Other people want to keep in touch
Something happens and it’s not enough
Never thought that it would mean so much
Other people want to keep in touch

Heaven won’t keep us together
Right place at the wrong time
It takes all kinds of weather
Distant new skies
Somewhere no one can reach us
These days go by
As you turn around-ow-ow-ow

Other people want to keep in touch
Something happens and it’s not enough
Never thought that it would mean so much
Other people want to keep in touch

Was it ever quite enough?
Was it ever quite enough?
Was it ever quite enough?
Was it ever quite enough?
Was it ever quite enough?

Full Lyrics

At the core of Beach House’s ‘Other People’ lies a melancholic ode to the ephemeral nature of human connections. With a dreamy soundscape characteristic of the Baltimore duo, this track from their 2012 album ‘Bloom’ encapsulates the quiet resignation felt at the crossroads of relationships.

On the surface, it’s a song that dwells in the realm of indie dreampop, but beneath the haunting synths and Victoria Legrand’s ethereal vocals, ‘Other People’ speaks to the heart’s complex journey through closeness, distance, and the unspoken truths that linger in between.

The Ephemeral Dance of Human Connections

Beach House, through the gently repetitive nature of ‘Other People’, captures a universal sentiment—the impermanence of relationships. The lyrics speak to a recognition that people come and go, leaving our lives just as quickly as they entered. As fragile as the connections may seem, the emotional investment and the quiet hope for something enduring clashes with the reality of ‘good love, goodbye’.

The song doesn’t just convey a sense of loss; it’s reflective, almost philosophical, about the nature of change. It’s this soft acceptance of the transience of life’s interactions that lends the song its bittersweet quality. In it, we see our own stories reflected—a series of hellos and goodbyes, and the weight they carry.

Dissecting the Quest for Authenticity

‘It’s your world, why would you fake it?’ This line pierces through the dreamy ambiance with a sharp question about authenticity in our relationships. There’s a suggestion that in the attempt to maintain connections, there’s often a performance, an artifice that leaves one wondering what’s real.

The song then becomes a mirror, reflecting the listener’s own experiences with pretenses in social bonds, imploring them to consider the cost of inauthenticity. The song holds up a lens to the theatrical masks we don, often to keep others close, or perhaps to shield ourselves from vulnerability.

The Haunting Echo of ‘Was it ever quite enough?’

The question ‘Was it ever quite enough?’ is a haunting refrain that serves as the song’s backbone. It’s the echo of doubt that haunts every ended friendship, every faded romance, challenging the very substance and meaning of past connections. Was the love given and received substantial, or was it, like a mirage, insubstantial and fleeting?

‘Enough’ is a measure of value, and in the currency of human emotion, Beach House scrutinizes what we invest and withdraw from our interpersonal exchanges. This lingering question isn’t really seeking an answer but rather acknowledges the hollow space that’s left when ‘other people’ move on.

The Paradox of Distant New Skies: Exploring the Hidden Meaning

‘Distant new skies’—this phrase encapsulates the song’s essence. It’s symbolic of the change and growth that follows the loss of connections. Just as the weather changes and seasons transition, so do the people in our lives, leaving us under new skies, distant from our past.

The hidden meaning here is not just about loss, but about the potential for renewal. Even when heaven doesn’t keep us together, and the right place comes at the wrong time, there’s a promise of something new. It’s in the very distance that Beach House hints at the space needed for self-discovery and future connections.

The Unspoken Anthology of ‘Other People Want to Keep in Touch’

At its heart, ‘Other People’ is an anthology of unspoken emotions that wrap around our attempts to stay connected. The lyrics ‘other people want to keep in touch’ evokes the gravity of expectation versus reality in relationships. Everyone wants to hold on, yet something always happens—it’s never enough.

‘Keep in touch’ becomes an epitaph for relationships that once thrived, a courteous phrase that bears the weight of what was and what will likely never be again. In these unspoken spaces, Beach House finds the weighty substance of what it means to be human, to love, to lose, and to ultimately persist in the face of ephemeral connections.

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